course
Masterpieces of Western Art (Art Humanities)

May 2021

She's the BEST! Totally sees her students as humans, always teaches us from unique perspectives on the art we study. Take Bailey's class if you want to feel happier and have fun during discussions! I also don't understand how she always is so put together with perfect hair and makeup so early in the morning while I roll up like a bean! Please teach us your ways, Bailey! She especially thinks about how we're doing with online school and totally takes into consideration what a reasonable amount of work looks like, especially under the circumstances. Thank you Bailey!!! U R THE BEST!!!

May 2021

all the (good) reviews are true!!!! I absolutely adored art hum with dr. knox, and this is coming from someone with literally no art history background. She's so, so passionate about the stuff she teaches and makes it seem really approachable in the way that she presents it. Workload is also not heavy at all; there are a few longer readings, but they're generally few and far in between (and to be honest, you can mostly skim them for the general idea), and the papers don't feel like much of a slog at all because she covers the subjects of the papers really well beforehand, so all you need to do is be able to summarize and structure those ideas in paper-format. It's also kind of impossible to not participate, at least in part, in her class because she likes to draw every student into the conversation, so it's not like she'll hit you with a low participation grade out of nowhere because she really makes an effort to hear from everyone. if her class is open and fits into your schedule, take it!!!!

May 2021

I failed his course and that's the only course I ever failed. Not worth it to say anything else, take him if you want. There are other professors that are better in the sense that you won't hear anything polarizing about them, on an introductory art course. Go take him, I'll wait.

May 2021

gold nugget material, TAKE HER CLASS!!!!!! I learned so much and now I want to talk about art with her forever. shes amazing, a genius, understanding and fun

Apr 2021

Rachel was a fantastic Art Hum instructor. Even though I took the class during the COVID-19 pandemic, she was engaging on Zoom and went to great lengths to make sure we understood the material and the workload was not overwhelming. While the class time itself was mostly lecture, she engaged with us through our assignments, which included conferences with her. The material is understandable even with no previous art background, and while I'm sure my experience would have been better if we had been able to go to museums, I still enjoyed the experience and felt like my instructor cared about my well-being.

Apr 2021

I have never written a negative review but I feel I need to write one in this case. Professor Wamsler’s class was appalling in that her lectures were extremely basic yet her grading was nonsensical and ridiculously harsh. It is a shame for professors like this to still be teaching at Columbia. Not only does she write rude comments on a papers/midterm, but she also provides no way for you to improve. It is impossible to think that over the course of the semester, for a student who tries extremely hard and gets A’s in other classes, that your work would not improve. She starts you out with one grade and does not change it regardless of the quality of your work. She is a horrible teacher and an even worse instructor. She will not explain to you why you did poorly and will not change her teaching method to actually teach what she is apparently looking for in assignments. This class left me fuming, beware. Side note, I had the exact same experience as students who wrote reviews multiple years ago. That should tell you something.

Apr 2021

Great professor. You won't regret taking her class. There is not much to add.

Apr 2021

Amazing instructor! Müge (pronounced "mew-gay". too many students incorrectly said it like it rhymes with "huge" to her face) is so cool and well-educated. She was really superb at making things from antiquity apply to our present lives. Even on Zoom she made sure we had fulfilling conversations. She also gave helpful feedback on essays and was invested in us enjoying the course. Also she had e-girl hair.

Apr 2021

I loved him as a professor! He was really interested in the subject matter and definitely knew a lot. The class was basically all discussion-based and we analyzed artworks. He was helpful and kind during office hours. He provided great videos and reading material that helped you understand the background of the art. Grading was great as long as you could identify the different elements mentioned in class. I ended with an A.

Apr 2021

She deserves a gold nugget! Literally the best instructor in the core I've ever had in my almost 4 years at Columbia. She absolutely loves art and it really shows. Honestly just take her class, you won't regret it. GOAT!

Mar 2021

This class isn't that much work, especially if you already know a little about art history, but Colby makes it infinitely worse with his teaching style. Every class he just cold-calls people one by one to ask specific questions about elements of the painting or the readings, often trying in a rather condescending manner to lead them to his preferred answer (even when it's aspects of the work that might be open to different analyses or opinions). He's not interested in creating a discussion or anyone offering ideas or insights, you're just ticking a box to prove that you attended that day and did the reading (or are a good enough bullshitter to get away w/o having done it). The readings vary in quality, though if you try to do all of them thoroughly you'll be wasting a lot of time since he pretty much never calls on EVERYONE in the course of a single class. The nicest thing I can say is that at least his writing assignments and exams are fairly short and easy. You could learn the same amount as you will in this class by dicking around on Wikipedia for an afternoon.

Jan 2021

Margot was an unfair grader and obviously caught up in her own little Art History world, at least during the pandemic. She decided this would be a great semester to give one more assignment than she usually does. She did not even use any hesitation in her voice when saying she was adding an additional, real assignment to a COVID-19 semester. Very tone-deaf. I am a literature/history person and have gotten solid As all across the board at Columbia in these subjects (not bragging, making a point), and it was not because the material was "easier" than MOWA..actually, I've taken far harder lit/history classes than this. And let me tell you....no one was more critical than Margot. But her comments were solely subjective and stylistic and had nothing to do with actual art history content. The only times they did was when I did not properly "regurgitate" (literally) what she said in class. Margot is the type who does not like to give out solid As, not because she feels no one deserves them, but because it makes her feel like she is the one in charge if she does not. There is what can only be called obvious intellectual insecurity when it comes to her "domain". And she is a bright woman, no doubt--but it is there. Don't be fooled by her personable nature...the passive aggressiveness only comes out on paper comments. If you are juggling many classes and life issues, especially during this pandemic, and want to receive a solid A if you do in fact deserve it, do not take this section.

Jan 2021

He was great! I thought the lectures were super interesting, lots of good discussions, and he is a very fair grader! He is also open to chatting about essays, etc. Overall had a very positive experience!

Jan 2021

I've never met someone who cared more about their job than this professor. I remember she teared up during one of our early classes while talking about how some art was not being preserved or something like that. She's very friendly, passionate about what she teaches, and gives interesting assignments. She is also accommodating in terms of papers/exams.

Jan 2021

Professor Bernstein is an amazing professor. She is clearly passionate about the subject and cares a lot about her students.

Jan 2021

Luke was great. Really interesting lectures, very lenient grading. He even told us what would be on the final exam. Some of the readings he assigns are unnecessary, others are important (and he will tell you so).

Jan 2021

I'll start with Margot's positives because she does have a lot. You can tell Art History is not only her passion but pretty much her entire life. She is a walking encyclopedia when it comes to Art History. She's clearly well-traveled because she's been to nearly every museum mentioned when speaking about where specific works are housed. She has all of her prior, renowned professors on speed dial and was besties with one of the authors we had to read for the Picasso lecture. Now, was he included simply because they were grad school besties and his work was somewhat relevant to the course, or because he was a standard read for all of the sections? Hard to tell. But she is clearly bright in this field and hangs around with other bright folks. If you love art and/or history or even better are on the art history track, you'll love this class regardless of the grade you'll get because you'll learn a lot about the things you're interested in. You'll walk away feeling generally more knowledgeable about your chosen path/interests. And that's all well and good. But if you're not really an artist, a historian, or an art historian and are simply taking this because you have to...and are juggling organic chemistry and calculus III or some other really tough, demanding classes...and could really use that "solid A" because any bump to the GPA helps, and any hit to the GPA hurts...we're at Columbia after all, so we all get it... This is not the section to take. Full disclosure: I have a natural aptitude for writing. I'm on a science track; however, I'm that person who has taken literature courses just for fun. I'm a late junior credit-wise, so I'm taking this on the later side of my Columbia career. And I'll tell you, no English/Lit professor at Columbia has ever marked up my margins like Margot! And that's all well and good if it's necessary. But, I found most of Margot's critiques to be very subjective/solely stylistic, and not really content related. My grades only got better (and they weren't bad, just not A range) when I conformed to her writing style...which was, well, hers, and entirely subjective. Though outwardly very pleasant (you will enjoy her class because she does have a wit and a charm), she does definitely have a chip on her shoulder when it comes to "her domain". When my critiques were content related they were mostly about how I had my own idea about a topic. But no, she would comment in the margin, it was actually "xyz" because that was what she said in class; essentially, she sought only regurgitation. And that's tough because her classes are unnecessarily lecture-heavy and there is a lot of stuff to remember. Solely based on her commentary, I was able to glean that: A) she really does not want to give out solid As because that's perfection, and let's face it, only she knows this stuff "perfectly" and B) she's a bit intimidated by people who aren't as dedicated to this field as she is and yet can still pull off pretty damn good papers. In this way, she is almost quietly passively aggressive, if that's even a thing. And the grading scheme was a bit ridiculous. She once gave me a B/B+. What does that even mean? An 86.5? An 88? And there's no outlined grading scale e.g. a 93 = A, 92 = A-, etc. I found myself loving but not loving this class. I walked away with an A-, but that really wasn't through learning anything in particular but kind of kissing up in my papers. And that's not fair. And it's not fair that this semester, out of all semesters, she chose to give five assignments instead of "her usual" four. When I heard her say that without hesitation it came across as very tone-deaf. But I'll give her *some* credit; she did give us a day to complete a relatively short take-home midterm and once gave a free extension out of the blue on an assignment. But I feel like those sorts of things aren't really necessary if the class is well planned and fair, or I suppose, fair to the people who are juggling really difficult classes/current circumstances and could use that solid A if they've earned it. And I was one of those people who did earn it, but sadly did not receive it because I was not "her type of student"; not the art historian, basically. However, if a receiving a B+/A- when you deserve an A doesn't bother you in any way, and/or you have even a tangential interest in Art History, this is your class, so take it.

Dec 2020

Professor Bernstein is pretty great. She's an excellent lecturer and clearly cares about the class a lot. Even on Zoom, she finds a way to engage everyone in the course. While the reading is heavy, it's not really necessary to enjoy the class and I definitely didn't read each class reading. Overall, excellent professor.

Dec 2020

She is a good professor and really knows a lot about the subject. Even if you have no background in art, she still manages to make this class enjoyable. Definitely recommend this class

Dec 2020

Megan Boomer is an excellent Art Hum instructor. I sincerely hope Columbia tenures her. We need more instructors like her. She is probably one of the most understanding professors I've ever had the pleasure to take a course with at Columbia, and I'm incredibly grateful to have learned from her this semester. She voiced her compassion for students at the course's start—and continued to put that compassion into practice throughout the semester. She is extremely sensitive to treating students as human beings who are, yes, trying to learn, but who also go through shit sometimes (to say it bluntly). I felt as though I was treated as both a human being and student in her class. This is rare to find at Columbia—and a quality other instructors ought to emulate. In terms of her pedagogical savvy, Megan excels on this front too. The class was most suitably structured. We had visual analysis assignments to submit every two weeks, discussion posts to post every week, three short writing assignments and one final exhibit proposal to submit by the semester's end. None of her assignments felt arbitrary or "work just for work's sake," and their cadence was perfect. During class, she lectured for about 15 minutes—and all the material was interesting/relevant. We then broke out into smaller groups to discuss our visual analyses, which was a particularly keen way to begin discussions on pieces that can, at times, feel daunting/incomprehensible. Our discussions never dried out, and I always walked away from class (or logged off Zoom) feeling like I'd learned something insightful. I HIGHLY recommend Megan Boomer as an Art Hum instructor, and, AGAIN, sincerely hopes that she is tenured at the university (or a university) in the near-future. It is because of her compassion, intelligence, and pedagogical savvy that students will thoroughly enjoy the Art Hum course.

Nov 2020

I really enjoyed being in Professor Unger's class - it isn't an overload of work, but it also isn't a class where you can just check out and not bother to participate/do the readings. Gwen really emphasized participation and engagement with the work, so even though I didn't come into the course with knowledge of visual art, I did really well just by keeping up with the readings and offering points during class discussions. She focused the course assessments more on writing than on testing memorization of details, which I personally liked. It made the course more about understanding than about regurgitating information. She also focused on portraiture in South America for her Ph.D. so she subs in cool works from outside the standard syllabus.

Nov 2020

TAKE HIS CLASS! YOU WON'T REGRET IT! I love this guy! I had him for Fall 2020, my first semester of college. Everything was online, and the transition to college was really scary and rough for me, but Professor Klein made at least part of the weird online experience enjoyable. His class is a bright point in my week, and I have learned so much. He's clearly very passionate about Art History and truly wants every one of his students to learn as much as they can. He is caring and kind, and an easy/fair grader. He doesn't overload you, and he is very understanding of a student's lack of experience in the art history field. Overall a great professor and person.

Nov 2020

We are in the middle of a global pandemic and she is the only professor to assign more work than less. Lectures are somewhat engaging but she grades quite harshly on papers and midterms. Disappointed because her previous reviews have been so good. she is not one to give students a break even during a pandemic... like seriously professors should be more willing to go easy on their students during an already stressful time.

Sep 2020

Take Molly Allen's course!! I was so scared of taking Art Hum, having never studied art before, and not really being very good at IDs. But Allen made the course very approachable with fun assignments, easy-to-understand analysis, and very little reading. She truly cares about appreciating art and tries to instill that same attitude in her students. While she can be a little disorganized, her course was so fun to take and I felt I learned a lot.

Sep 2020

Professor Unger was amazing for Art Hum, chooses the most interesting things to focus on in the curriculum. She does a great job of focusing on the big picture ideas and doesn't get tied down with having us memorize small details.

Aug 2020

Very knowledgeable professor and his class was entertaining and informative. He's also super organized which is nice. If you have him don't expect a light work load, but don't switch out if you're willing to put in the effort. When I took the class we didn't have to memorize a single thing as most of the work involved was analyzing the art and writing about it.

Jul 2020

Disclaimer: I took this class over Summer 2020 and it was online due to coronavirus Joey was a great professor. He was super fun, made the lectures interesting, and kept the class engaging. He's very passionate about the content and loves to really ramble on about each piece, telling stories or delving deep into analysis. Depending on the kind of person you are, you can find this interesting and fun, or annoying. I personally really enjoyed this class, it grew on me by the end of the semester and I would highly recommend him for Art Hum. The only negatives are that he is a tough, but fair grader, and that his lectures went over time 99% of the time which was frustrating at times.

Jul 2020

I took Art Hum with her during Spring 2019. Overall she was really nice and understanding. Lectures were chill, she would just put up slides and ask for observations. She is not an easy grader and the workload is heavier than other Art Hum classes. Would not recommend is you're looking for the easy A art Hum.

May 2020

Keep in mind I'm taking this over the summer and it is condensed, and also over Zoom because of coronavirus. She takes this class insanely seriously. I'm sure you'd learn a lot from her, but as someone who does not care for art or art history, this class is a nightmare. There is a heavy workload and she expects a lot. I will probably be switching out.

May 2020

Wonderful prof: lectures keep you engaged, low workload homework, relatively easy tests, cares about what you think. Her grading system is fair for essays, and often very generous for tests and exams. Slides often don't include descriptions, so showing up and taking notes is important. She'll mention the test topics in the classes leading up to the exam (both midterm and final). She is very knowledgeable, even if you have a background in art, she shows many different perspectives of the work. Still, she isn't strict, and her teaching method works well. You'll definitely leave the class feeling decent about western art. Don't switch sections!

May 2020

She was a good art hum professor. Rumor has it that her workload is higher compared to other Art Hum professors (but as I have never had any art hum professors, I do not know the validity of this). She is incredibly knowledgeable in her field. Definitely left the class with the type of insight into Western Art that is promised from Columbia. Great class. Unless you personally know of anyone better, Dr.Perkins is a great get. Only complaint is that it's an 8:40 which no amount of coffee could help. Doable workload. My advice would be, "Don't be afraid to try adventurous analysis with the art." She seemed to gravitate towards analyses that seemed different than what she had heard before. This doesn't mean to come up with something out of left field but be bold in the analysis (and be able to back it up).

Apr 2020

Professor Siemon was really good and the lectures were really engaging! Even if you're not into art/art history (especially since it's a core requirement), you'd probably still enjoy taking this class. Highly recommend professor Siemon for Art Hum!

Mar 2020

She is literally the definition of the GOAT! TAKE THIS CLASS!

Jan 2020

Overall solid class, did not blow my mind, sometimes classes were hard to get through also our class was late in the day but he does a good job of keeping discussion going. I definitely learned a lot.

Jan 2020

Julia is sooo great! She genuinely cares about her students, is very flexible with due dates and only wants her students to learn about art and enjoy the class rather than giving them a hard time. She's a good lecturer, knows her art stuff and makes the class very enjoyable overall. And the workload is super light! Highly recommend her for Art Hum, even if you're not interested in art at all she'll make you be into it.

Jan 2020

I agree with positive reviews below. At first you may perceive her as strict and formal, but you'll see that she genuinely cares about her students and their learning. She is very cognizant of the white male hegemony in arts but counterbalances it by including works by female artists or underrepresented minorities. Her lectures are clear and eloquent. Grading wise, Professor Sivard has clear expectations. Before you submit the paper, read the checklist she provides carefully--if you miss any minor requirements you will easily lose points. Overall fair grader, but not an easy A either. But, if you participate actively in class and memorize works for exams you should be fine. I've heard of many Art Hum professors who have absurd expectations or otherwise uncaring, so if you get Sivard you should consider yourself beyond blessed.

Jan 2020

Don't expect Professor Larrive-Bass to light you on fire with passion for art history. Her lectures are pretty dry, mediocre at best, although I came to look forward to catching up on sleep in her class (I'm an art history major by the way — it wasn't the subject matter that I necessarily found to be a drag.) She would sprinkle in a few discussion questions here and there because it's what she is supposed to do, but it was hardly engaging: I mean, if someone expressed a belief that Jackson Pollock's Number 1A prophesied the destruction of America by extraterrestrials via thermonuclear fire in the year 2020, I think she would probably just be like, "Mm-hmm." I truly felt like it did not matter what anyone said, so it was hard to motivate myself to participate. Also, she would occasionally incorporate comparisons with contemporary art in an attempt make things relevant to the youths of today, but the work she chose to talk about was the most boringly commercial sh*t like Jeff Koons, Anish Kapoor, Banksy, and hilariously, Jay-Z and Beyonce's "Apeshit" music video. Maybe it's just me — my peers didn't seem to mind — but in my opinion there are tons of art that is more interesting and complex and worthy of discussion than what she presented (I'm talking about the works she chose to include on top of the established art hum curriculum, to be clear.) HOWEVER, I hate to sound harsh because Professor Larrive-Bass is a very sweet woman who genuinely cares about her students. She brought treats to both exams. She let the class vote on when we wanted to have the midterm. She said we could call her anytime if we had questions. She compiled a list of art exhibitions that students might be interested in checking out over break. All in all, she definitely did her best to be as accommodating as possible and to make sure everyone was successful. Although this was hardly my favorite class, I ended up really liking Professor Larrive-Bass as a person. TL;DR: If you're looking to knock out the Art Hum requirement with the least possible effort, look no further. If you actually want to be engaged and challenged and excited by the course material, she is not the one for you!

Dec 2019

Professor Gorant is by far the worst college professor I have had. Her style of teaching is extremely patronizing— she expects her students to have a vast understanding of art history prior to taking the course, and asks questions in class that are far beyond the level of comprehension any other art hum course expects their students to master. In class, she allowed one student to yell at another because they did not agree with the statement the other student made. When the student being yelled at attempted to apologize to the student yelling, Professor Gorant told the apologetic student to leave her class and not come back. Aside from her completely unacceptable treatment of students, her grading expectations are baffling. She gives a strict page limit on writing assignments, then writes commentary about how she wishes you could’ve added more detail. The midterm was graded as if she was teaching a writing course, not art hum. Overall, a horrible professor, but I did learn a little.

Dec 2019

I highly, highly disagree with the other reviews. I never leave reviews but I was surprised at the others so I felt moved to defend the class. It sounds like these people below were so neurotic about getting into law school that they couldn't take a bit of feedback on their writing. You hear stories about these types all the time who end up begging their professors to give them a couple of extra points at the end of the semester because they need a perfect GPA. I respect that you have goals and that this class is a requirement that most will never return to again, however, the fact that you're applying to grad school doesn't entitle you to always get an A+ and it's a bit pathetic to expect so... ANYWAYS Professor Helprin is amazing. I only took this class for the requirement, like everyone, but it ended up being my favorite class. She's very smart and really engaging. She did an excellent job of facilitating discussions - the reason it was my favorite class is because people really participated, shared their thoughts, and I felt we discovered things together. She gives you enough information about the topics so that you understand them but she gives so much space to discuss and analyze which I thought was very refreshing. She's good at facilitating the discussions and I always felt I learned something new. The readings are interesting so I never felt it was that hard. I do enjoy art outside of class so perhaps I am biased, however, I highly recommend this course. Especially if you're in a lot of lecture classes, I found it really energizing to finally get a chance to participate and share my opinions. It's fun to do visual analysis.

Nov 2019

Olivia is by far the best humanities professor that I've ever had at Columbia. As a stereotypical computer science major, the humanities are not my forte. I signed up for this class with the idea that I would end up, in the best case, with an A-. On the first day of class, I observed as students in the class were quick to identify various works of art that Olivia presented to the class. Moreover, from my perspective, these students were talking about ideas and concepts that went right over my head. Nevertheless, I was astounded by Olivia's ability to immediately make the subject matter accessible to everyone in the class. More importantly, if you have absolutely zero knowledge about Western Art prior to this class, it is completely feasible to end up with an A. Lastly, you'll actually end up learning a lot about Western Art, and you'll find the class as well as the material that is covered to be quite enjoyable. With all that being said, it's not a free A. You'll have to put a reasonable amount of effort into the class. For example, you should actually do the assigned weekly readings in order to be able to participate during class. The upside to this is that your efforts will be rewarded in the end. I know that I am not the only Columbia student who is jaded after exerting myself in a class only to be disappointed with the end result. If this has been your experience, then Olivia's class will be refreshing!

Sep 2019

Echoing the ideas in the other review of the art hum course taught by Professor McKelway at Reid Hall, you must reply to his emails within two minutes of receiving it(yet when there is a question that the class desperately needs answer he will not reply unless you text him several times.)Do not whatsoever get stuck in England during a week-end trip due to Brexit and miss one class. You can't make any typos on any of the 2 paged double-spaced papers otherwise he will write one page single-spaced criticism of your grammar. Anyway perhaps the most telling anecdote is that Professor McKelway cancelled a trip to Versailles with no explanation an hour before we were supposed to meet there. (It takes about an hour to get to Versailles.) Students who were already on their way decided to go anyway and ran into him there.

May 2019

David Schneller is a nice man and certainly knows how to keep you awake at 8:40am. The class was not difficult and David is super cheerful and funny. His background is in classical art so he really made the beginning of the semester interesting. However, I felt as though his class was geared mostly towards people who had no background in art and were taking art humanities because it was required. He really tried to make the paintings/sculptures/architecture interesting but I think he often overgeneralized the works and prepped us on how to memorize info for the midterm/finals without really teaching us to understand the art from a deep, critical level that I had hoped for. If you have some background in art or art history and looking to push yourself, you're going to leave this class not satisfied - I would look for a different teacher. However, if you're not interested in art and looking for a chill class (and an early riser) that's an easy grade - definitely take this.

May 2019

If you're looking for an Art Hum professor, I highly recommend Professor Baumgartner. She made the class really enjoyable and engaging, and she was also really great at framing the class in a way that helped people like me with little artistic knowledge understand and talk about the material. I also really appreciated how she tried to incorporate artists from diverse backgrounds into the class whenever possible. She is really nice and very understanding. She is also a relatively easy grader and gives a lot of freedom with what topics you want to write about, which I thought made the assignments more difficult.

May 2019

Super unhelpful feedback on essays, and very harsh grading. Generally a very unapproachable professor and expect yourself to feel killing yourself (note- mental health is a real problem and if anyone has any issues, Nightline is an available resource) every single class entirely due to Colby's self-centeredness, condescension, and lack of any sort of care for students.

Apr 2019

She's so nice!! Makes it easy for you to talk during class, really helpful during office hours. Also, the midterm is very easy (you discuss the paintings during class before), the final is a comparison essay, the museum visits are decent and you get a free membership to The Frick! Take the class!

Dec 2018

IF YOU READ NO OTHER PART OF THIS REVIEW, JUST KNOW YOU SHOULD TAKE/STAY IN THIS CLASS!!! Art Hum with Page Knox is something you won’t regret. Here's why: * Prof. Knox is great at her job. Her lectures were informative, engaging, and concise. She posts all of her slides online (pro tip: print them out before each class to take notes), and provides in-class guides for each lecture. I never went to office hours, but she was always responsive via email and after class. * She acknowledges the lack of diversity in the Core. There was an entire class on Kerry James Marshall (this amount of time was not dedicated to any other artist). Google him if you're not familiar, he's the best. * It’s not difficult to get a good grade, regardless of your background in art. I came in knowing nothing and was fine, but so were the other kids who were Art/Art History majors etc. PARTICIPATION IS KEY. * The workload is more than manageable. Her assignments aren’t too frequent or taxing, and she provides detailed instructions on how they should be completed. * The field trips. They were time consuming and annoying to schedule, but there is so much value in seeing the artwork you've studied in person. Like the other reviews mention, Prof. Knox works at the Met and gives most of her tours there. There are also trips to MoMA, The Whitney, The Frick, and the cathedral on 110th. Most trips are optional! I definitely did not expect to enjoy a required 8:40 as much as I did, this woman deserves a nugget!

Dec 2018

Eliza is seriously so awesome. Arguably the chillest teacher I've ever had at Columbia. I'm not at all an art person and she made everything so interesting. All you have to do is pay attention and take notes in class and you'll get an A. She's a super easy grader and so understanding. For example, on the first paper I forgot to answer part of the prompt and she still gave me an A- and I turned in the second paper a day late and she still gave me an A. I would highly recommend this wonderful woman.

Dec 2018

Nice class! There are some museum visits (one to The Frick Collection-you get 1 year complimentary access!!!), the papers are ok and she gives you an extra credit opportunity if your participation grade can be improved. She seems really nice and ready to help. Plus, you don't have to do the readings. Take this class!

Sep 2018

It's been about a year since I took Rachel's class, so I don't remember a ton of details on grading and stuff, but I felt compelled to write a review because Art Hum with Professor Silveri was the best class I've taken at Columbia. Rachel is smart, competent, engaging, and funny. I left class every day feeling challenged and fulfilled and like I'd actually gained something tangible. She is also kind and caring and makes the class worthwhile without overburdening the students. I respect her so much and think about stuff I learned from her class all the time. She made Art Hum actually feel like what the admissions brochures pretend that Columbia is like. I can't praise her enough.

Aug 2018

If you’re taking art hum because you want to learn the material, you may enjoy class with Budd, otherwise, AVOID. The grade in the course is 65% from 2 exams that are EXTREMELY difficult and she takes off points for the smallest details. In addition, there are 2 papers and participation counts for only a very small portion of the grade. In other sections, participation counts for a significant chunk of the grade and the professors are more self aware as to why students are enrolled in the course. Additionally, Budd computes from New Jersey, so there are no office hours or other opportunities to meet with her outside of class. Overall, this class ended up being way more work then it should have been, so I would strongly suggest avoiding unless you have a strong interest in art history and are fine putting in 10+ hours and work outside of class each week.

Jul 2018

I have taken the summer section of Ms.Floyd's Art hum. I am an electrical engineer who was never really interested in the subject. I wanted an easy A. Let me just say that I really LOVED LOVED her section. Ms. Floyd is kind,generous and exciting. Her slides are on point. Her devilry is flawless. She gave us everything required from the first day in class, and she gave us ample time to get everything done. She responds quickly to emails and questions. This was a fresh breath of air from my old engineering professors. Her section is on the easier side. She was really realistic with that given that it was the summer. It was a bit unfortunate though because at the end she realized most of us were not that interested in the material. The last few classes ended pretty quickly. I think most of us got between an A+ and a B+. Anyways, she is a goddess of kindness. I was pretty sick the last two weeks of class, and I needed more time to finish the essays. She gave me more than I wanted by 2 days, and She didn't mind that I submitted things a little bit late/over the deadline. Other professors would have straight out failed me, but she was really supportive. She even brought us bagels for our final. She brought her own toaster as well. My main criticism would be that * only a few students talked in my sections * This was more of a case by case study of different pieces than a hsitroical overview. I would recommend watching Khan academy Art's section as it made me appreciate the different period.

Jun 2018

Sure yes, this class is demanding and you may feel frustrated with the workload and start resenting the professor, but this class is doable, and Mailman is very passionate about music and teaching. For a 3 credit class you are going to have a workload more akin to a 5 credit class, and whilst there is a lot of preparation--reading the textbook, watching videos, doing the Mediathread assignments, there is also a lot of flexibility. Prof Mailman gives opportunities for extra credit both on homework and the exams. We had to write two papers, one on the opera which we went to together as a class and the other for a concert of our own choosing. He gave us ample time for both papers(several weeks) and provided detailed feedback. The final exam did literally take the whole 3 hours and was very content filled, yet there were many opportunities for extra points in one area if you may have struggled in another. I would say don't take this class if you are simply just looking to fulfil the core requirement and want to drift, but if you really want to learn about music, and are prepared for all the work that will come with truly developing a skill that you may have otherwise not pursued I would recommend this class.

May 2018

She has a thick accent, making my brain hard to work actively to perceive information. This course has presentations and she asks the students to draw sketches. I dropped after the first class.

May 2018

I completely disagree with all the negative reviews here. I have had Professor Wamsler for Art Hum and a course while abroad in Venice. I LOVED her both times and would absolutely recommend her as a teacher. In both classes, every other student loved her too and I don't understand the bad reviews on here. She is engaging, slightly awkward with her German humor but honestly so caring and amazing. She respects people who genuinely try to engage with the art and is great at teaching/conveying info about art. I agree with people who have said she doesn't give a ton of feedback. However, if you reach out I'm sure she will clarify. She does give As, despite what other reviews have said...so yeah I love her so much.

Apr 2018

Overall, Huffa is a solid Art Hum teacher and if you're in his section then I'd say you're in capable hands. While I initially found his lectures at the beginning of the semester a little unengaging and our classroom discussion a little lacking, by the end of the year I found myself consistently engaged during his lectures and discussions. Part of that was due to the material, he definitely seemed more at home discussing Modern and contemporary art as opposed to classical works. The field trips in his class are definitely in a highlight and I wouldn't miss a single one if you can help it.

Feb 2018

Super chill professor, really kind and tries to engage the entire class in discussion, lenient grader, what more can I say

Jan 2018

Amazing professor! Very stress free class spent just commenting on art. Really appreciated that she never rejected our answers and seemed open to any interpretations we had. Easy grader and would absolutely recommend! little to no work required except on the day before essays are due.

Jan 2018

11/10 would recommend. Super sweet, knows her stuff, and always seems happy to be teaching. She is quiet and has a french accent, so it sometimes takes a while to cover the slides in lecture. Class is mostly student-led discussion, so it is much more enjoyable if you engage with the material and speak up. As a freshman with no formal background in art history but an interest in art, this class was fairly easy but super interesting.

Dec 2017

Rachel is great! As someone who took Art Hum as a junior, her class makes me regret not exploring art history earlier. We were her 10th+ semester teaching Art Hum and she really has it down (often anticipates our questions/reactions in a funny way, and is very in touch with the student experience). Rachel created an environment where I really felt like I could participate even though I had no prior exposure to art history. She basically asks "what do you notice?" about each work of art making it easy to speak up. She's great at facilitating conversation, although students really drive it with their raw observations. She also posts her slides after class (although they're mostly images with artist and date) which is nice to look back on for papers. The readings were generally short (10-20 pages), but not required to participate well. You do have to write a 1-page double-spaced reading response for each class (part 1 is summary, part 2 is your thoughts/impressions), but these can easily be accomplished by skimming the reading. She grades on a check-minus/check/check-plus basis. I felt like the reading responses were a good way of making us extract the main points without being too onerous. She likes to get student feedback on the reading, especially when it is one she hasn't assigned before or conceptually challenging. Other than reading responses and participation, the class is entirely paper-based. For the first two papers she gives prompts on specific works (all on display in NYC, and you have to bring a ticket to show you saw it). You have to integrate at least 1 reading in some way, but that makes finding something intelligent to say much easier. For the third paper, you can write about any piece of art on display in NYC as long as you get it approved. She has you submit an outline which she comments on and grades before the final paper is due which is super helpful. She's always very responsive to email and is very accessible during office hours.

Dec 2017

This was actually my favorite core class at CU largely because of her. She's engaging and interesting, but also creates a really low stress environment. You have to go to class, like most Art Hums, but I really enjoyed attending and the class material-- coming from someone who could not care less about these things. Both the midterm and final were take home and super easy/ not that long, and if you get lucky, you can reuse your observations form past paintings. 10/10 would recommend as Art Hum.

Dec 2017

AMAZING!!! Had an 8:40 class but still loved to get up for her class. She is young, chill, and dresses well. Brought us food sometimes too! She creates good conversation in class. Super interesting discussion even for an intro art class

Dec 2017

Professor Sivard is hands-down a gold nugget––she really cares about her students. My experience in her class has given me a really meaningful understanding of art that has helped me understand society better, and links really well to the rest of the core. I think this is the section to take if you believe that the core can make your ways of interpreting knowledge more whole. The museum trips were probably my favorite part about the course, as we took time to look at female artists and artists of color who are left out of the curriculum. Dr. Sivard is quite cognizant of the fact that the curriculum is made up of white male artists, so she gives a lot of opportunities to think deeper about how marginalized people fit into our conception of history. My favorite segment looked at the female nude and the power-based implications these images have on the viewer.

Oct 2017

Take the review below with a grain of salt. While Sivard is an excellent lecturer (she's engaging and goes at a pretty good pace), she is a pretty tough grader. The reading isn't really light either, she has graded responses to the readings so you do have to do the readings and not just skim it. Wonder professor but not the easiest art hum professor.

Aug 2017

James (goes by Colby) was a really nice, young guy and a pretty easy grader, at least in my experience. I submitted the weekly reading responses late multiple times and wrote the final paper without having actually read the articles that I was writing about and still got an A-. It's annoying that he places so much emphasis on the readings, but you don't really need to do them to get an A-, and he does make an effort to explain them before assigning them so they're easier to understand. However, like one of the reviewers below me, I absolutely hated the way he structured class. He calls on people and asks them to make comments about very specific aspects of the painting, which means that you'll be forced to speak about something that doesn't interest you while you actually might have something interesting to say about some other aspect of the painting, but his need to control the conversation won't allow you to take it into another direction. He also asks questions based on the readings, so things can get a little awkward if he calls on you but you have no idea what he's talking about b/c you didn't do the reading and you're not good at making things up on the spot. As a result, class discussions were incredibly boring (unless you enjoy listening to people nervously spewing BS while trying to guess what a professor wants them to say). TL;DR: The class is easy enough, but Colby managed to suck all the fun out of Art Hum. Pretty disappointing. BUT he doesn't actually require you to go to the MET for one of the essays like most Art Hum Profs do! He'll also throw in a joke here or there to try to keep everyone awake, and he doesn't seem to mind if you have to submit something late.

Aug 2017

Anne Higonnet is the best professor I have so far had at Columbia. As a lecturer, she is engaging, incredibly knowledgeable, passionate and does her best to involve every student in the class in the discussion. Her lectures are built around input and debate from the students rather than her simply speaking at the class, and she gives a sense of really appreciating what everybody has to say. As a person, she is an absolute gem. Prof. Higonnet is both personable, kind and an absolute badass. Her outfits are consistently very cool and she interacts with students in a way that makes you feel relaxed, but also very much in awe of her. The combination of her extensive expertise and welcoming, funny personality meant that I always wanted to do better in her class, and found myself working very hard to impress her and do well. Essentially, I don't have a single bad thing to say. I took her class over the Summer in Paris and found it to be the most rewarding experience I've had at Columbia. Whilst other classes and professors where beginning to annoy me with their approach to education, ArtHum with her was a very welcome breath of fresh air.

Jul 2017

I had Gillian Turner (now Gillian Turner Young) for the summer session of Masterpieces of Western Art. While she is kind and will allow you to hand in assignments late, she is a harsh grader, and her feedback is anything but helpful. She will assign a descriptive paper, grade it, and state what she wants in the research paper. When you follow her advice on the research paper, she will criticize you for following her recommendations. She criticized students for being too theoretical on the descriptive papers, so when they submitted factual research papers, the students' grades suffered. Likewise, she warned students about being too factual on their descriptive papers, so when they wrote their research papers based on theory, she lowered their grades. If she is going to offer feedback, then she should not be wishy-washy with what she wants. She needs to make her directions clear. Clarity is important for students! Honesty and ethical standards should be a standard for professors to uphold. When I asked her with other students about the descriptive paper grade, she told us not to worry as she gave nobody a grade higher than a B+. Later, a student showed us that she received an A from the professor. While I appreciate art, I was not a fan of her style of modern art. Nude women dancing with animals and in paint is not something I enjoyed. Professor Young had trouble understanding historical facts and figures, and our class had to teach her. For instance, she had no idea who John the Baptist was, even though he appeared in several art paintings. I would never expect a professor to know everything, but he or she is teaching about a historical era of art and the specific people in the paintings, and the professor has taught classes before in art history, then I would expect the professor to come into class prepared to teach accurate material. Professor Turner also seemed to have obvious favorites in her classroom. She advised me to speak more often during class sessions. I constantly had my hand raised, yet she was slow to call on me. Also, my voice is not loud like other students. Vocal ranges should have nothing to do with class participation grades. We took two field trips, which were mostly enjoyable, except our class was told to be quiet in the Metropolitan Museum of Art because of her. She made us converge in separate groups to discuss art groups, so the discussions were an understandable distraction to art visitors. The class was three hours, and Professor Young showed herself not to be a leader in the classroom. The class went off topic many times, and she had problems getting the class on topic again, so when the class did get back on track, we were often released late. Pros: -Modern art if you're interested in the topic. -Field trips to two art museums plus one art museum on your own time. -You can hand in assignments late, but if you are a diligent student and turn in your assignment on time, your grade won't be any better. -She is easy to speak to if you have questions, though her answers impacted my grade negatively. -If you are her pet, that could be beneficial to you. Cons: -Harsh grader -Unhelpful feedback -Won't call on you and will criticize you for not participating in class but will call on her favorites (unless you are her pet!) -Time consuming papers -She's a Teaching Assistant (TA), not a true professor, and her inexperience is evident in the classroom. -Proven to be dishonest about her grading system -You might get out of class well after the 4:10 deadline -Disorganized class discussions

Jul 2017

just don't. ridiculously high expectations for a 1000 level class; inconsistent grading and feedback; self-contradicting policies; impossible to determine what the "right" answer is.

Jun 2017

What an incredible professor! Michael Fowler is SO knowledgable and his enthusiasm about the material is contagious. I found myself fascinated by his lectures and was inspired to enroll in several more art history classes (next semester) after taking this class. I am so glad I took this course early in my academic career as I am now considering doing a major or concentration in art history. Not only is Michael super intelligent and a great lecturer, it is clear he is a great guy who genuinely cares about his students. He is friendly and encouraging in office hours. Moreover he totally changed my outlook on art history and I have found myself referring back to the material we learned in this class for several of my other courses. We need more professors like Michael at Columbia! If you get the chance to take a course with him do it!!!

May 2017

Oh boy, where to begin with this one? For starters, he flat-out didn’t know the material on the Art Hum syllabus. This makes sense since he’s a specialist in Japanese art, but I cannot for the life of me understand why he was cleared to teach a course where all of his lectures sounded like he had skimmed the Wikipedia article five minutes before class. I took this class at Reid Hall in Paris, and it was painfully obvious that he didn’t give a sh*t about teaching, but just wanted a semester-long paid vacation in Europe. He confirmed this theory by canceling class several times to go skiing in Switzerland or visit friends in Italy (but don’t you dare get sick and miss class without getting a note from a doctor, though, that’s just disrespectful). To make up for the lack of content in his teaching, Matthew would embark on truly fascinating stories about his personal life. There was that one time his friend made a joke about the “penis patrol” (fig leaves over dicks) that he just *had* to tell us every single time we saw a suspiciously covered dick (this happens a lot in art hum). There was the gleeful slut shaming of another friend’s teenage daughter who had just gone on the pill. There were endless “rude” French people who insisted on speaking to him in English, never mind that his French accent is oh so very painful and basically incomprehensible. And woe be upon the student who doesn’t laugh at his jokes about the “orange creature in the White House”—that’s a third of a grade docked right there. Other ways to lose points: -failing to address him with the utmost formality in an email (“Dear Highest Professor of Wisdom, the Sage and Learned” is a good start). -daring to submit *anything* over email, even if you have no way of printing. -not stapling your drawings to your paper. -showing up late because he made the start time earlier and you have a class right beforehand. -visibly knowing more than him. -basically anything that will set off his inferiority complex; never forget, he is supreme in all matters. Also, he puts a very breathy “h” at the beginning of words that start with “wh.” This doesn’t actually affect his teaching but just hwhy, Matthew, hwhy??

May 2017

I really enjoyed taking Art Hum with Wamsler. I was very worried because I had never taken an art class before and had no idea how to critique art // write a paper about art. I went to office hours before the first paper was due and she talked me through a bunch of topics I could write on. She also circulated a list of things to mention during our second paper which was a comparison of two paintings. The annoying part about this class is that it was an 840 and you had to make trips to museums or other sculpture sites to write your papers. I think she could tell when someone lied about going to the museum but I respected her for it. She is a very interesting woman. I found her very funny just because of her particularly awkward German humor, but she was also a very kind woman and the type of teacher who never tried to force her view on anyone. She would give you an opinion of her painting or her interpretation--especially with something like Jackson Pollock--but if you disagreed she was okay with it. I would recommend this class to literally anyone and I hope to take another class with her later on even though art is not anywhere in my major or minor. She spends her summers in Italy so she really has seen most of these works in person and she knows what she is taking about. She has genuine intentions and really just wants her students to learn.

May 2017

Total douche. At all costs avoid taking class with this guy. He weighs participation very high and makes it almost impossible to get a good participation grade without doing some sort of extra credit. If you talk twice a class expect a C range participation grade. He grades all assignments like an ass and wouldn't know good writing if it hit him in the dick. Do yourself a favor and don't take class with a professor who degrades students because he's miserable with his life as a art phd.

May 2017

Don't take this course. Chamberlain was nice, smart, available when needed, and a good lecturer, although I strongly disliked the way he structured the course and assignments. He placed enormous emphasis on the readings (very dense and difficult to understand articles). Not only do the weekly reading responses add a great deal to the workload of the course as a whole, most of the assignments were based on the readings (midterm included a "relevant references" section, essay #2 was entirely based on the readings, final exam was a critique of an article). Most art hum sections don't actually require students to do the reading, and for good reason. I feel like this introductory course for non-art history majors made me detest art history. I would much rather focus on the actual art works than on articles that discuss the artworks. I ended up reading more for this class than for Lit Hum. The vast majority of the class is spent on students answering questions, as Chamberlain calls on everyone once every class. This led to unproductive discussion as, instead of learning what Chamberlain has to say, we spend most of class listening to a scared student trying to bs something.

Apr 2017

Take her class. Learn art. ??? Profit. Great professor, deserves a gold nugget.

Mar 2017

Art Hum with Dr. Delbanco was an incredibly worthwhile experience. Her teaching style is mostly lecturing, while encouraging frequent student participation. She led us on 2 trips to the Met and 1 trip to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. She is ABSOLUTELY brilliant, and her interpretations of certain pieces just blew my mind. I entered Art Hum with a pretty good basic knowledge of art, and was immediately humbled by the skill with which she was able to interpret. When I went to museums towards the end of the course, I was able to see things I never would have noticed before, and have a great newfound appreciation for the works. Prof Delbanco is very analytical, and is not afraid to challenge conventional wisdom. Although we did not cover as many works as some of the other sections, we really delved into the ones we did look at, and really built up skills of interpretation that can be applied to many pieces. She does expect a lot in the papers, although they are each fairly short. You have to be crystal clear in your interpretations, and not leave any major details out, so I'd definitely suggest meeting with her in office hours before each paper where she is incredibly helpful. Her exams are straightforward if you remember what she says in class and read her comments on your papers. This was a very enjoyable class.

Jan 2017

I completely disagree with the previous review (from November 2016). I was in the same class, and I thought Nomaduma was an amazing instructor. She went above and beyond teaching us the standardized Art Humanities curriculum, especially when it came to questioning both the course and art history's acceptance of racism and sexism. She definitely knows what she is talking about and gave our class an insightful perspective into the masterpieces selected by the Core office. She also went to Columbia University for both undergrad and her graduate program so she understands what it's like to be a student here. I 100% would take her class again and recommend it to anyone looking for an intelligent and approachable teacher. Her assignments were very straightforward, and I really enjoyed working on the final project. I came into this course not knowing anything about Art History or even how to think about a piece of art. Nomaduma completely transformed my ability to both look at art and interrogate social institutions.

Jan 2017

Amanda Gannaway is AMAZING. I loved her class so much, she really made Art Humanities interesting for everyone. The exams were easy if you paid attention in class and the papers were always manageable. I loved that she incorporated other artists not in the official curriculum when talking about certain art movements so as to include famous women artists and to point out cultural appropriation. (Every single artist we officially study is male.) I cannot express how much I love her, everyone should take her class. She has inspired me to take other classes that focus on art during my time at Columbia as well. She makes the material both interesting and easy and facilitates student discussion flawlessly. I give her an A+!

Jan 2017

So glad I took this professor for Art Humanities- he is super competent and knowledgable about the material and the lectures were very engaging and interesting. He was also understanding about deadlines and was willing to grant extensions if necessary for the semester long exercise. 100% would recommend taking this professor!

Dec 2016

Friendly, very engaging, will go out of his way to help students. Opens himself up for frequent office hours. Knowledgeable to classical era especially, but well-versed in every unit. Has clearly done his homework. Classes are very much a group conversation based around slides; very little lecture.

Dec 2016

Huffa is a great professor. I would definitely recommend him for Art Hum, as he leads interesting discussions and is very relaxed. I would definitely encourage anyone to take his class.

Dec 2016

Professor Fowler is truly an incredible professor. He goes out of his way to help students and exudes a contagious level of enthusiasm for the subject matter. His lectures are energetic and intellectually stimulating. He is always excited to take the extra time to speak outside of class. His passion for the subject material and for instruction in general is really extraordinary. If you have a chance to take Art Hum, consider taking his section!

Dec 2016

I had Dr. Greenberg for Art Hum. Dr. Greenberg is a great instructor to have for Art Hum. As someone who did not know a lot about art, I felt like my contributions were always welcomed and valued, even if they kind of missed the mark. His style of teaching art hum is a bit different from other professors (from what I've heard). He taught the class primarily through discussion. We did not have to memorize names, dates, or works of art. There were no quizzes; I listed the total workload below. The course was not stressful at all, the workload was light compared to other classes. For the final, he sent us six questions, three of which were on the exam. Two of the questions on the exam were submitted by us, the students. He only teaches one section a semester, so if by some chance you end up in his class stay there. Would highly recommend him.

Dec 2016

Colby is likely the best teacher I've ever had. His assignments are thoughtful and not labor intensive. I learned more about art history then I ever have before. He is a wealth of knowledge spanning a wide variety of topics - it was such a joy to listen to him. He's incredibly passionate. I feel lucky to have been randomly placed into his class. I highly recommend you seek out this class if you want to come out of it having learned something.

Dec 2016

To disagree with the other review, I highly recommend anyone who has the opportunity to take this class! The readings are not 80 pages as stated below, usually 2 are given a week and if uninterested, you can really only read one (about 20-30 pages each.) Seriously engaging class with someone who is highly informed and passionate about his subject - pretty much any question you have will be answered with incredible insight. The classes are super interesting and, quite often, funny, and the essays are short, few and far between. Definitely my favorite class of the semester (and I am a science major!)

Nov 2016

Michael is the single most enthusiastic professor I have had at Columbia. Not only does he commute back and forth from BOSTON every week, but he also prepares his lectures extremely thoroughly as not to waste students' time. He takes the time to sit down with each student outside of class to talk with them about their essays, too, and sets multiple deadlines so that students can improve their work before it is submitted as a final, polished draft. He also was the first professor I've had at Columbia who made any effort to put the Core in context of it's inherent flaws, calling out its focus on white male scholars and inserting the voices of other groups where appropriate (without tokenizing said groups).

Nov 2016

Martina Mims is by far the best professor that I have had in Columbia. I wonder why she hasn't had a golden nugget here. I took Arthum with her last year, and she was very encouraging, but she also commented on what is right/wrong in people's comments, making you learn a lot in a relaxed atmosphere. She genuinely cares about her students. It's been over a year and she keeps asking how we're doing when some of us from that class run into her sometimes, and has written rec letters for a few of us. In fact, at the beginning of the my Arthum class last year when I told her that I felt sort of intimidated because I had no background in art, she took me to a cafe on campus, bought me water, sat down with me outdoor, and encouraged me with really sincere words. I became very involved in that class. She has that attitude towards all of her students, and obviously knows well about them: when someone doesn't talk in class, she will call on that person by pointing our his/her previous experience or probable expertise on this matter and invite him to comment on this. Everyone gets to participate in some way, and actually enjoys the class.

Nov 2016

I echo the review below. Sandrine was a great professor; her lectures were concise, discussions were productive and most importantly - expectations were clear. Yes, she is pretty dry (lights are turned off during class and you flip through images on most days) but, you also get do some fun things like visit museums and a cathedral. Anyways, if you need to take ArtHum and are looking for a professor, I would recommend taking this course - getting an A is extremely easy if you just show up to class. P.S. - there is a fair amount of reading (no need to do it all)! Skim through every other reading or so and you will be fine. None of the readings are tested on, but you want to make sure you have something to contribute to the class discussion here and there as participation counts, and she will jot peoples names down when the comment.

Nov 2016

Nomaduma is the WORST instructor I have ever had at Columbia. DO NOT take Art Hum with her - it would make you hate art history. IT IS SIMPLY A DISASTER. She's a PhD student so she may not teach every semester, but I'm writing this review (this is the first review that I've ever written) because I'm genuinely disappointed in her class, and I don't want anybody who has the slightest interest in art history to take this utterly boring and unsubstantial class. She just doesn't know what she's talking about. I feel like I've learned more by going through the readings myself and looking up on wikipedia than going to her class. I have taken art history before and it really is an interesting subject, but Nomaduma is just ruining it for me. Sitting in her class is a real waste of my time. I'm so disappointed that I really wonder why Columbia lets her teach. Ughhh!!!! Oh and she regularly cancels classes so we're always behind the schedule that she has set. If you want to learn something about art history, DON'T TAKE HER CLASS. You would hate this class and deeply regret not having dropped it, as I now do. If you just want to get through Art Hum to fulfill the requirement, ALSO DON'T TAKE HER CLASS. Find another instructor who can at least articulate her assignments instead of using language that's confusing to every student in the class!

Nov 2016

I took this class over the summer and was pretty happy with it. You'll spend a lot of time in the dark looking at slides but that's to be expected I suppose. I found that Rachel graded fairly. The exams were open note. The only thing I would warn about it messing around during class with your phone or something like that, because she will basically cut you. Also, she doesn't seem to love being disagreed with, which was odd. However, the lectures weren't boring and the material wasn't difficult.

Nov 2016

I LOVE MARTINA MIMS! Seriously, I've been recommending her to everyone who has yet to take ArtHum. She's really great at facilitating class discussions - I have no background in art/art history/analysis whatsoever, but I found it easy to say something of value in class. It's really relaxed, but I also learned a lot that I didn't think I was going to retain..and then I went to Italy and was able to pull from what she had talked about. Her grading is lenient, and she makes sure you know what to expect for the tests and papers so you're well prepared. Martina is great. She's understanding, intelligent, friendly, approachable, and great at teaching the subject. Take her if you can. If I could go back and take this class again, I would!

Oct 2016

Good teacher, too much work. Change if you get him, unless you want 80+ pages of reading a night, intricately critiqued essays, and a whole lot of weird speech emphasis on the "ct" sounds in words and the word "right?" after every single sentence.

Oct 2016

I took Professor Gosse's Art Humanities class in Spring 2016. I strongly recommend her class. Johanna is an alumna of Barnard and much younger than the typical Columbia professors. I think it's safe to say that she's "cooler" than them too. She is very reasonable about the amount of workload that she assigns and you will learn a lot from her, without resenting being in her class. I took the class because it is a graduation requirement, but I have already found myself using some of the concepts that I learned from her in my everyday life and in other classes. With that said, it safe to say that I enjoyed her class. Johanna demonstrated to me that she cared about my well-being as a student, which meant a lot to me. She is approachable and makes herself available outside of class. I recommend attending her field trips to museums (which are mandatory anyways) and staying late with her if she offers you extra time. These field trips were my favorite part of the class, because Johanna applies concepts to real life art (as opposed to powerpoints). I was originally scheduled to take this class from another professor, but was able to switch into Johanna's after a week into the semester. Unlike the other professor, Johanna wasn't boring and assigned a reasonable amount of work. She also created a sense of community between myself and my classmates, whereas the other professor encouraged a sense of competition.

Oct 2016

Sandrine is a great professor. Yes, her class is pretty boring - every lecture consists of sitting in the dark staring at pictures. But, she's extremely kind, approachable and makes her expectations extremely clear. There's also a field trip or two, which is much more interesting. All in all, I highly suggest taking this class.

Sep 2016

Professor Bernstein is amazing, she is one of the best professors I have had. She is very animated and keeps Art History fun and energetic even though some of the material can be pretty dry. Works great with students, but big on punctuality so do not be late to class. This was one of my favorite classes and she is definitely the professor to take for art hum. The class is a lot of memorization and not intensive with daily homework, just need to study for exams.

Aug 2016

Totally agree with the below review. I tried so hard for the class and clearly I didn't get an A. Why? Because she just doesn't give As. I approached her multiple times of the course of the semester, asking for more feedback and ways to improve and she said - hey, you are doing so fine!!! B+ is a great grade. LOL WHAT. Not in Art Hum. I have friends totally cruising through other sections of Art Hum and getting A/A+s. I put in so much work, always spoke multiple times in class, and she did say I'm a very good student but..... B+. OK Wamsler. OK. BE WARE. Do not take the class if you want a chill Art Hum experience. Don't expect an A. Expect B~A- with a ton of work. However, you will learn about art guaranteed. Why? Cuz you need to freaking memorize everything including the date of creation of artworks.

Aug 2016

I was really not looking forward to taking this class, as I've always dreaded art, but Julia did an absolutely amazing job at making me finally appreciate art! I took this during the summer so classes were 3 hours long, but she was really good at making time go by quickly. I gained knowledge in art that I think I might actually use in the future and also gained a ton of art analysis skills I never had before. Participation is VERY important, but Julia makes it a very low stress and chill environment. Previous reviews make her sound like she's a bit cocky/bitchy, but that really isn't true, i think she might just come off like that at first because she just knows so much. She also really cares about ALL of her students (one of her reviews says she is biased against guys. Speaking as a straight dude with a penis, I strongly disagree with that reviewer's comment). It's also a plus that she gives SUPER SHORT READINGS (like 5 pages per class MAX) and is a lenient grader—but maybe that's just cause I was taking her class during the summer. I'm a lazy premed science-oriented student, but this was easily one of my favorite classes taken at Columbia. If you can, switch to her class. Trust me. She deserves a gold nugget.

May 2016

Elizabeth Perkins is a great professor who does an excellent job of presenting concepts clearly. Perkins also utilizes multimedia, such as videos or documentaries, to supplement lectures and make them more interesting and relatable. Even though I'm not super interested in art, her enthusiasm and knowledge of the subject was contagious and even got me to start looking more closely at art. She is also very nice! Definitely recommend her for Art Hum.

May 2016

Professor Sandrine Larrive-Bass was one of the best professors I have met during my time at Columbia. She is extremely knowledgeable, passionate in her teachings, and always well-prepared with her spot-on powerpoints. She also encourages discussion, but not excessively - the mix between her lecture and discussion is just right. She also grades really fairly, no surprises, and what I like best about her is she simply is a really nice person who is very approachable for students. Her reading assignments are also very light, which makes sense since many Columbia students don't do those due to the length. Yet, she always assigned minimal amount of reading which basically made me do the reading all the time. Long story short, take her for Art Hum, highly recommend!

Apr 2016

I originally signed up to take her class because of the reviews below. However, its been more than halfway through the semester, I've given her a chance, and I am WRONG. First of all, she often rude towards her students. All of us remember the one time a student asked a question, and Professor Wamsler said "Okay....-insert smirk- now answer your own question" with the most disrespectful and scornful look I have honestly seen any teacher give at my time in Columbia. Grading for the class: she graded harshly for the first paper and midterm as far as I'm concerned. Best part is, she gave some people two grades, yes TWO GRADES. For an Art Hum class that meets at 8:40 am and with students who pay attention and care, she sure grades tough. She gave like one line of comments for a 5-6 page paper and something like B-/B.....what does that even mean?!......but actually....do I get a B- or a B....? Final thoughts--I don't hate the class don't get me wrong. She is clearly knowledgeable in what she teaches and the material is interesting. However, at least from what I've heard, Art Hum and Music Hum are supposed to be lighter courses that are enjoyable. I do not enjoy this class. Because of the fact that none of us have rarely had exposure to art, writing about it is difficult. I'm so concerned about getting a low semester grade in one of the easiest core classes that I can't enjoy the material she's actually teaching. Pity

Sep 2015

I took this class last fall and really enjoyed it overall. Carrie is a nice lady and is really passionate about teaching. Not much work for the class. There's a weekly visual analysis which is quite simple and is graded extremely leniently. One midterm, one paper, and one final project. I think she was a bit harder on the grading of the paper, so just a head's up. Carrie really takes the time to explain things and even added extra sections about Japanese art which I found really interesting. As long as you participate in class and put effort into your work you should be fine! Just take the paper and final projects seriously. Would recommend this class!

Aug 2015

Julia is THE BEST. She's interesting, funny, and relatable. She maximizes learning and minimizes work (*best of both worlds*). You will do well in the class if you are engaged with the lectures (which isn't hard to do because she makes them interesting). I can't imagine a better art hum professor. She deserves a gold nugget.

Jul 2015

Kathy's ArtHum section was a great one to be in. It wasn't as easy as some sections can be, but Kathy made it really interesting and interactive. She is a veritable fountain of knowledge about art, and did all of her lectures without notes, start to finish, and without even any filler words or seemingly having to think hard to remember what she had to say. She put an emphasis on participation as an element of our grade, but all participation was voluntary: she didn't force people to talk who didn't want to talk, but did encourage everyone to take part in her Q&A discussion style every once in a while. The papers made you think and were sometimes a bit challenging to write, but if you put a decent effort into them and she could tell you'd thought deeply about the topic she'd give you an A. As for the readings, I didn't do any of them except for when she told us we'd need them for a paper or the final, but I got by just fine. One of the things I really loved about Kathy's section was that she created assignments that forced us to go independently to all of the major art museums in the city--the Met, MOMA, the Guggenheim, and the Frick--as well as places like St. John the Divine. Even though I often felt like I didn't have the time to spare for these trips, I always found that spending a few hours in an art museum on a Saturday morning was really fun and helped me refocus and de-stress (not to mention being educational). Overall, great section, and I'd recommend it to anyone looking to get a solid education out of ArtHum.

Jul 2015

Professor Baumgartner was a good teacher. We all understood perfectly the material that we were meant to be learning, and often had interesting conversations about the pieces. The only downside is that she is very soft spoken and at times the class felt slightly flat. However, if art is a topic you are naturally interested in, the pieces and her guiding analysis of them were good.

Jul 2015

I had Prof. Mylonopoulous for Art Hum in Paris last semester and as someone who wasn't looking forward to this core class, I was shocked by how amazing this class was. I don't know if it was being in Paris or having such an awesome professor or a combination of the two, but I'm so glad to have had him as my instructor. He really cares about the students and encourages you to think critically. He makes it so easy and comfortable to talk in class, which helps because participation is so important in these smaller core classes. The syllabus thoughtfully integrated all of the resources of Paris and you can tell he spent time selecting museums and pieces throughout the city, even taking us outside of the city on trips to see some of the architecture pieces that we studied in person. Class was not stressful at all, as along as you speak up and voice your opinions. He never made anyone feel stupid about their observations/interpretations, even though there were some out-there remarks. His accent is also charming - a combination of so many different European accents because he can speak so many different languages! Ioannis was cool. All I can say is take his class if he's teaching in New York.

Jul 2015

This was the best class! Professor Mims is extremely knowledgable on all things art, but she also creates a wonderful atmosphere that I have yet to experience in any of my other classes at Columbia. She lets her students discuss the art in whatever terms you feel comfortable with rather than lecturing, which was really interesting. It also let everyone feel welcome to add to the conversation regardless of how fluent you were art terminology. Professor Mims definitely lead the class and steered conversation, but everyone would talk to each other rather than just spouting off information at her. We also went on two "field trips", which were extremely interesting and informative! We went to St. John of the Divine and got an extremely comprehensive and unique tour of the cathedral (we even got to see parts that are off limits to the public tours). Almost everyone in the class did well and I don't think anyone got below a B (the majority of students got A-'s I think). If you want to learn about art, how to discuss art, but mainly how to interpret art using the skill set you already have then definitely take art hum with Professor Mims!

May 2015

Tom was such an awesome, engaging, interesting, and chill professor. I have very little experience with art/art history but Tom made me so interested in what we were learning about, and his class was my favorite course of the semester. He is an extremely fair grader and has a great sense of humor. The reviews below literally sound like they are written about a totally different person--Tom is great. I enjoyed his class so much and I'm so glad I didn't listen to the other (completely wrong) reviews he's gotten on CULPA. Take his class!!

May 2015

Leah Pires' section of ArtHum is what you wish every CORE requirement at Columbia could be; thought-provoking, relevant, and fun. I am a sophomore in SEAS, and I can say with confidence, that this has been my favorite course so far at Columbia. For the first day of class we were asked to contribute our favorite work of art and then explain what interested/intrigued/confused us about it. This was a foundational exercise that opened up an art dialogue that would continue throughout the semester. While Leah is a graduate student instructor, the depth and quality of her art analyses are substantial. Lecture is hardly boring and a number of novel insights can be gleaned from just one sitting. However, class time is not spent idly taking notes or listening to Leah profess. Most of the contributions in class come from the students. She made it very clear at the beginning of the semester that the caliber of the course would be determined by our participation; no comment is too small, no question is too poorly worded for Leah. She brought out the best in our responses and was able to connect them to the art at hand. Through many afternoons of observation I have learned that, as a rule, every contribution elicits a reaction from Leah. There's either a follow-up question or a paraphrasing statement that helps to moderate the class discussion. Even if she has no idea where you're coming from and doesn't understand the point you are trying to make, she will clarify until everybody understands what you're saying. And if that seems intimidating, it really shouldn't. Leah makes it clear that so long as you can substantiate your claim with details from the art, you're opinion is valid. Leah's research focus is on modern art, so naturally the class spends roughly half of its sessions on 19th/20th century works. She does her best to include relevant readings that are directly related to the class material and are interesting to read. My one regret in this class is that I couldn't do more of the readings. As for Leah herself, she very much fits the art scene "type." The only colors she ever wears to class are black, white, gray, or brown. Every once in a while she'll break out her favorite accordion pleated blouse with a Mona Lisa hidden in the folds (lookout for it). Her demeanor is very hip, calm, and talkative. Did I mention she's hilarious?

May 2015

Carrie is definitely young, optimistic, and full of energy - however, she seems to have pretty high expectations for this class. Granted, maybe high expectations is a good thing, but in art hum it became a bit tiresome. She knows the material well, and her lectures were fairly interesting - she brings in some Japanese/Asian art to complement the regular core syllabus since it's her area of expertise. Interesting class for the most part, but she really just lectured at us the whole semester and wasn't particularly great at prompting or mediating any sort of interesting discussion from the class.

May 2015

Dr. Kehoe is just fantastic. I had her for Art Hum, and she made Art History one of my favorite topics to study. She is HILARIOUS, engaging, knowledgeable, approachable and amazing. She has a great sense of humor, which she incorporates into her lectures. Out of all of the core classes I have taken, I can recall the most information from Dr. Kehoe's class because of how memorable her lectures are. This was one of the few classes I regularly wished would last longer, each session. LOVE HER and take her if you have the chance. PROS: - trips to the Met & St. John's Cathedral - everything about Dr. Kehoe - the class discussions: it seemed like almost everyone participated because they wanted to - the workload: very manageable - the readings!!: very carefully selected; reasonable; no busywork - the first paper: to analyze one of the buildings on campus; fun to do - doesn't expect you to memorize a billion dates and names of paintings - only the few you write on for the exams CONS: - ... classes too short? Seriously, our entire class adored Dr. Kehoe, and I can't think of a single negative about the class - She might be leaving Columbia after her postdoctoral fellowship

May 2015

Page is AMAZING. I absolutely loved her class. At first she was slightly off-putting and came off a little aloof and too good for us but as the course went on, she became so approachable and so kind. I highly recommend emailing her to ask for museum suggestions if you ever travel anywhere because she will jump on that as an opportunity to give you a list of like 50 places to see complete with her personal annotations. There are a lot of museum trips involved in her section, partly because she's a lecturer at the Met which really comes in handy for getting privileged access to certain appointment-only rooms which is awesome. Page is a clear, concise lecturer who made an 8:40 section worthwhile and extremely interesting. Take this class!

May 2015

These reviews really do give a great representation of Tina, and it's easy to see why. The fact is, great professors are often polarizing, and Tina is no exception. She has an effective teaching style, with an approachable personality conveying a dense amount of information that is made easy to understand if you put in the effort. If you come to her class with an open mind, you will learn a ton. She is a tough grader on papers, but she gives good criticisms and guidance for how to rewrite your paper for a higher grade and just expects you to write well-thought arguments. She includes readings for every class, which greatly enhance the class and while not strictly necessary, if you don't do them you'll miss out on a lot of what's going on and only superficially understand the lectures. As these reviews show, if you're like 95% of students, you'll love her. She is accessible during office hours, and still takes time to help former students long after they've taken the class (especially if you go on to more Art History), which is why so many of us think highly of her. Unfortunately, if you have the stubborn arrogance to suggest that you know more about a subject matter than the professor (while simultaneously not being able to appreciate the depth of her arguments and differentiate them from wikipedia), if you are the type of humorless misanthrope to become enraged by the fact that your professor has a personality, and if you have a frail ego that cannot accept having your superficial, elementary opinions questioned and corrected, then you will no doubt have that illusion shattered by a professor like Tina, who refuses to feed your delusions. If you're that guy, you should probably avoid her class and just read wikipedia instead. Otherwise, you'll end up here a year later, still nursing a grudge that she didn't give you the A that you didn't earn (but you still felt entitled to), and trying to exact your revenge by impotently lashing out in multiple negative reviews, failing to understand why most people actually love her class and unable to just let it go and move on. For the rest of us--healthy, well-balanced students who just want to learn from someone who knows their stuff and isn't boring--you will be glad you took Tina's class. If she does ever teach Art Hum again in the future, I can't recommend her highly enough. At the risk of repeating others, she's pretty awesome.

May 2015

If you’re looking at this review, it’s probably because you were placed into Professor Buonanno’s section. Lucky for you, Lorenzo is one of the best professors the core has to offer. He emphasizes visual analysis over rote memorization. Although participation is factored into your grade, he never forces students to speak and instead prefers natural discussion. He will entertain any question and will never mock a student’s interpretation of a work (no matter how ridiculous). Perhaps his best trait is his ability to keep the course material relevant--he incorporates pop culture references and contemporary issues into the discussion using his quirky sense of humor. Overall, I found his ArtHum section to be both informative and enjoyable. I never missed a class (even when I had mono).

Mar 2015

I had O'Rourke for art hum last summer. Despite the short time-frame, she managed to make it an intellectually engaging and relatively painless experience. If you get her, do not switch out! She's obviously sort of brilliant but also engaging and actually quite funny. I went into the class with some serious skepticism and found to my surprise that it was so much more interesting and complicated than I would have guessed. By the end, I was definitely that annoying guy who puts his hand up to answer every question. If you have to sit through three straight hours of art hum, you would be hard-pressed to find a better instructor to do it with. She knows a ton, but still wants to hear what you think about things. The readings were a nice mix of contemporary and historical sources. I especially appreciated the emphasis on visual analysis and critical thinking over rote memorization. It was the best core class I've taken yet, and probably one of the best I've ever taken at Columbia. In sum: great instructor, fair grading, enjoyable experience.

Mar 2015

This class (art hum) was incredibly interesting at times. I really enjoyed working on the essays. The amazingness of the course made up for the fact that Caitlin was the most boring and uninspiring teacher I've ever had. She practically discouraged participation with her blandness. We (the few of us who contributed to class discussion) were able to guide the conversations which was good but I often found myself on the verge of sleep. Overall great class but terrible professor. She's a sort of fair grader I would say. Take her class if you are good at participating, if you dont want that much work, and are ok with being bored to death during class. You might learn something. Thanks to the predetermined art hum curriculum.

Feb 2015

Professor Joseph is one of the best professors I've ever had, especially considering I was extremely worried about taking Art Hum since I am not particularly interested in the field, but he really made the class enjoyable. Readings were quite minimal, no final, and most of the classes I actually enjoyed. He made it about historical references just as much as the actual analyzing. He's one of the most knowledgable professors I've ever had and respects when people put in work into a class. He even made me appreciate (some) value in Warhol and those artists which I previously thought were a waste of time.

Jan 2015

Once again, someone *cough* Tina or her friends, is writing reviews for her because she desperately wants that Gold Nugget. Exhibit A: look at the review on January 18, 2015. This student mentions that he/she took her class “last year”. In the fall 2014, Tina didn’t even teach art humanities according to the course directory. In spring 2014, I was one of the students in her class, and my classmates can attest to the fact that there were NO freshmen in that class, thereby making one question the entire review. Exhibit B: Review on December 10, 2014. Not many students write a review a year after they’ve taken the course, yet this “student” wrote another glowing review of Tina. Seem similar to exhibit A? Exhibit C: Look at the number of disagrees with all the positive reviews of Tina. Exhibit D: Look at the writing style of the positive reviews. Do they seem similar/use similar adjectives/sentence structure? These reviews are extremely positive and completely unfair for students who want to get the whole picture of Tina. While she may be okay at teaching art humanities, her personality, particularly her stubborn nature and her arrogance, are a huge turnoff for the class.

Jan 2015

The biggest benefit of Knox is that she's been teaching for a while, and she works at the Met and is well connected to the museum scene. So she'll offer lots of field trips, which are actually kind of fun, and an easy way to get face time with her. She's pretty passionate about lots of the art, and is well organized. She offered a review section for the final, alternate times for field trips, etc. The downside, IMO, is that she often seems to want a single right answer from the class, and when she asks questions she doesn't really embrace alternate or conflicting opinions. The midterm had some tricky identification questions, and involved a bit more memorization, and a little bit of writing. The final had easy IDs for unknown works by artists (but come on, at the end of the semester if you can't tell pollock vs rembrandt vs picsasso you deserve a poor grade), plus a bunch of written responses/essays. Overall she's a totally fine art hum professor and offers a very acceptable and normal section. You can easily do well if you show up to class, pay attention, and actually visit the museums to write your papers.

Jan 2015

If you check your SSOL and Eliza's name comes up, congrats! You got into the good section. Exhale. Relax. Forget about switching around your schedule and pushing off Art Hum -- yet again -- because you've struck gold this time. Let me break it down for you... First, her teaching style... Eliza leads discussions really well. She lets class discussion flow naturally, but at the same time leads it along with her slides and keeps it moving. She was really good at getting everyone to participate (and as someone who participates often, it was not ever in an annoying or forced way that slows discussion down). She is excellent at taking what a student says and fleshing it out, making it more nuanced and informative. Second, her personality... As you will realize from the moment you meet her, she is one of the top five nicest people in the world (maybe top three even). She is really chill about late assignments, and she would probably let you hand in an essay a week late if your pet turtle had the flu. She's very accessible and easy to talk to. Last, and what you've been waiting for, her grading... In my opinion, and I can't speak for everyone, Eliza grades pretty leniently. Like other Art Hum sections, you never need to do the readings (except when there's a response paper). However, if you put in a decent amount of time on the essays you should get an A on them, and if you spend 5 minutes studying for the exams you will be stellar -- just review your notes and memorize the dates/locations. Also, she grades so that even if you get a question wrong, if you justify it well you will get almost all the credit. At the end of the day, I had the feeling that if she knew you cared about the class and participated often in the discussions, you were guaranteed an A. Overall, there is every reason to take this class. It's a good time, you learn a lot, and if you devote a few hours to the essays you're bound to get a decent grade.

Jan 2015

I took Art Hum with Tina as a freshman last year, and I consider myself really lucky to have had her as a professor. While it seems that some reviewers don't share my opinion, I can only speak of my own experience, which was excellent to say the least. That said, I won't argue that there are probably easier art hum teachers out there who won't push you to delve into the material like Tina does. She is a serious art historian and is fully prepared to offer a wealth of knowledge about the subject, for those who are willing to listen. As an economics major who may never again step foot in another art history or related course, I think it will carry some weight when I say that this was one of the most valuable classes I have ever taken. I say this because having taken art hum with Tina I now feel comfortable approaching works of art that before, would have intimidated me. Taking her class will give you the tools to interpret and unpack any work of art - from the Parthenon, to Pollock. She will teach you that art is not made for memorization, and that approaching art with curiosity and persistence can grant you a remarkable sense of understanding. Part of the reason I chose Columbia was for the unique opportunity that the Core presents - namely, the opportunity to learn about Western art and culture in a way that will be advantageous for years to come. And, I think many will agree that this was a big part of their decision, and that this is what the Core Curriculum is all about. The goal isn't, and shouldn't be, to pick up an easy A or to snooze through a semester of lectures. The goal is to walk away with a more complete and meaningful outlook, in this case with respect to art. In sum, I can confidently attest that learning about art and how to approach it from Tina has been one of the highlights of my time at Columbia so far. As with many things in life and especially the Core, this class and all of the things you can take away from it are fully dependent on how much you are willing to put in. Should you be so lucky as to have Tina as a professor in any capacity, I hope you will jump at the chance to learn from her a new way of looking at the art around you.

Jan 2015

She was great for Art Hum. Very accommodating and kind. Her specialty is modern art so expect more focus on the new rather than the old.

Jan 2015

This was the most painful class I have taken at Columbia so far. I love art and was really looking forward to this class being light and fun, but it wasn't. This is not a history class, but rather the focus is on being able to analyze the structure of painting, sculpture and architecture, which is cool if you are able to understand your instructor. MSD has a french accent which can sometimes be difficult to understand and she also has a tough time with effectively relaying concepts. Her presentation of material is also highly disorganized which makes it extremely difficult to take notes. She'll show you one slide, grill you with questions that you aren't sure of how to answer, and move forward 3 slides only to go back 2 previous slides. It was all over the place and super frustrating. She did make herself available after class or by email, but asking for clarification didn't really help. I spoke with many students in the class that felt just as frustrated and lost. The workload was time consuming and some assignments actually included drawing. One trip is to St. John the Divine Cathedral which you are expected to draw the outside facade of the church and part of the inside. Granted, she explained she wasn't expecting a masterpiece, but it was time consuming and unnecessary, especially if you can barely draw stick figures. The reading material was dense and uninteresting, and she made sure you read it by assigning reading responses. 3 to 4 museum trips, St. John the divine and walk around campus drawing columns. Exams are a mix of identification of works of art, definitions and short essays analyzing known and unknown works. Tough grader.

Dec 2014

Ms. Beach was a very nice teacher; she's not exceptional, but she's good. She raises challenging questions and points out interesting things in the artworks and historical contexts. She really just agrees with most all comments in the discussions, and only rarely will she challenge your point. She's a fair grader, and if you put in the effort, you can do well on the essays. Be sure to be very specific on midterms and finals, but most importantly in this class, PARTICIPATE! Go a little bit above and slightly beyond. Go to office hours, talk in class, have all the requirements when you turn in your papers, do the readings; these all factor into the participation portion of the grade (25%) and she notices. Overall, I would be totally willing to take another Art Humanities class with her again!

Dec 2014

Great teacher, probably my favorite this semester. He's a good guy and cares a lot about the material. Class was pretty engaging, and he knew a lot of interesting tidbits about the works of art. If you get him, don't switch out! Workload was fairly light and the grading was pretty easy.

Dec 2014

Professor Chiong is really great. The class I took started at 7:10 at night and I was afraid after having been in class all day that I would totally zone out during this one but professor Chiong made sure that didn't happen! She does an excellent job balancing lecture and discussion and always includes some interesting facts about the artist or piece. She really fosters a passion for art and has inspired me to visit more art museums! Definitely recommend taking this course with her.

Dec 2014

Tina is an amazing professor. I was not looking forward to art hum that much, and certainly not any more excited about it after hearing other students' experiences with it. But, the way Tina taught the class made my experience fun and conducive to willful learning. She cared more about teaching her students how to understand and interpret the material than about meaningless regurgitation of dates and associations. I took so much more from her class than I expected to and I am truly grateful for that. Her tours of the Met and the MoMA were fantastic. Also, meeting her in office hours was a huge help to my understanding of the material and how to interpret it in my assignments. She was open reasonably often for in person meetings and always provided fast and fruitful feedback to e-mails.

Dec 2014

Little bit worried going into this class. I'm not a very big art person, and a first-year (I think?) teacher made me kinda nervous. That said, it was completely unwarranted. Joseph (Professor Ackley? I never really cleared up what his title was) was a killer teacher. He made art seem really engaging and understandable, and gave really interesting prompts that made you think about the material. The discussion was great in the class, and you could tell that he really had a passion 1) about art and 2) about helping us learn it. He was really great, a sweet, funny instructor who knows his stuff inside and out.

Sep 2014

Tina is an exciting, dedicated, friendly, and knowledgeable teacher. I'm an economics major; I've never really been interested in art, so I wasn't looking to this course. She succeeded not only in keeping my attention through the three-hour summer lectures, but in convincing me why good art matters. She's excellent at bringing complicated ideas down to a simple level. She's informal; she doesn't expect any background knowledge. And she's very willing to sit down with students and talk over ideas. I found her paper feedback in particular to be very helpful.

Aug 2014

Tina is, hands down, an incredible professor. When I first signed up for Art Hum, I knew virtually nothing about art and was taking it to fulfill the requirement. However, after taking the class with Tina this past summer, I feel like she's truly helped me gain an understanding and appreciation for art. Her class lectures were very thorough, interesting and well-organized, and it’s clear that she put a lot of effort into making sure that she provided additional depth and explanation to supplement the presentation slides and handouts. She was really good about returning papers within just a few days, and more importantly, always included a lot of useful feedback to help us improve. In addition, she went above and beyond standard office hours in proactively offering other times when she could meet with us for help. Where Tina especially shined was on our field trips. Seeing a painting in a museum is so different from seeing it on a PowerPoint slide, whether it’s the vividness of the color or the texture of the canvas, and she did a great job not only explaining the often complex message each work of art was sending, but also asking critical, probing questions that would allow us to discover art on our own—and this approach was absolutely enlightening, better than any tour I've taken at several world-class museums. Art Hum was a great class, but what really made it stand out was how amazing Tina was—she was the best professor I've had at Columbia. If you ever have the chance, TAKE HER CLASS!

Aug 2014

An incredible professor. Rare is it that you find someone with a combination of such brilliance and such engaging pedagogy. Michael really does his research, knows a ton, and constantly exudes his passion for the material. He has every right to be full of it, but is far from it - he's incredibly personable and approachable, and really cares about each student. Words really can't do justice to his praises - if you have a chance to take Art Hum with him, do it!

Aug 2014

Tina is an amazing teacher – and Art Hum course with her was one of my best core classes at Columbia! She is excellent in what she teaches! If you are genuinely interested in understanding art, then this is definitely the class you should go for. This class meant a lot for me because I had always loved looking at the artworks, but had felt inadequate in my ability to analyze or appreciate those earlier. This course had been a transforming experience for me, because Tina not only gave us a strong contextual understanding of art in the different eras, but also helped us develop an overall appreciation of the artists’ genius by thoroughly explaining what really lies at the heart of each masterpiece. Her descriptions were complete, accurate, and flowed in a very clear , sequential, and logical way, which really helped us grasp the developments in art really well. Her lectures are engaging as she has an extensive knowledge of this subject and is very supportive in guiding the students to perform better. She is very articulate, explains the concepts with a strong interest and passion, and motivates the students to do well and to participate in the class. I will definitely recommend taking the Art Hum course with Tina.

Aug 2014

I just finished the summer session with Tina Rivers Ryan. She is a top notch instructor. She is extremely knowledgeable and well-versed on the subject matter. Her lectures were well organized and well presented, verbally and visually. Summer session classes are 3 hours long, which I thought would be awful. However, each class flew by. I learned so much in this class. Tina's lectures were carefully structured and very interesting. She had terrific slide presentations to enhance her lectures. In addition, Tina encouraged class participation and has a great manner when dealing with her students. This added to the learning experience. Our class experienced very fast turnaround on our papers and Tina's feedback on them was thorough and very helpful. Tina teaches her class with great energy and enthusiasm. Absolutely one of the best professors I have had at Columbia. I would love to take another class with her. Highly recommend!

Jul 2014

There is no need for you Culpa staff to post this review, but please read it carefully so that you do not further deceive students. It's ridiculous at what lengths Tina will go to get back her gold nugget. I don't usually write culpa reviews, but I feel like Tina is deceiving all the other culpa users in the future looking to receive an accurate review of her. I have a feeling many of these reviews are written by Tina, or her close friends. She is good for Art Hum, but definitely not as "awesome" as most of these reviews make her seem. Any professor that can get greater than 40 Agrees on a positive review, let alone an Art Hum Professor who only has 20 students a semester, is suspect to careful review. I hypothesize she either up votes herself, or has friends do it for her. It is absolutely atrocious and unethical. Look at the December 10, 2013 in particular. How often do reviews come in so closely packed, all positive, same writing style, etc. Look at the agrees. Just carefully think about it. In conclusion, please review her previous posts, the amount of agrees on the positive reviews and disagrees on the negative reviews and carefully reach a conclusion about whether she really is so "awesome".

Jul 2014

I took the Summer Art Humanities Course so it was the abbreviated version, but if I had known it was going to be as well taught as it was I might have considered taking it during the full semester. Maggie did a great job of introducing art concepts as we zoomed from Ancient Greece to 20th Century Pop Art in the space of 6 weeks. The main thing is that the class was not the horrendous bore that I was led to believe it could be. Often it is taught as an art survey course with an undue amount of stress placed on memorizing specific artists and dates of paintings etc. Maggie taught the course as an introduction to critical analysis of art, focusing on elements in the artwork and themes expressed. Historical context was important, but not emphasized over being able to intelligently express opinions about how the piece was executed and its effect on the viewer. It was an exercise in critical thinking, not rote memorization and that makes a HUGE difference in getting anything out of the course.

Jul 2014

I disagree with the negative comments below about professor Harrist. Firstly, he is a very passionate art historian and he knows well what he talks about. I don't like any of the core classes but I can say that I really learn a lot from him after this course. Secondly, it is right that he grades work heavily on grammar and writing skills. This bothers me a lot and it's difficult for an international student like me to catch up. So what? Hard work pays off. He does appreciate your improvement and he tries to urge students to improve. That's the point. I have met easy instructors before, I'd rather stay in a class that has a lot to learn with a tough grading professor than in one that's way too boring with nothing left in my brain after the final but I still manage to get good grade. And what else can you ask for? He's an art expert, and he's stubborn about his art concepts. But he puts that aside and just grades papers on the writing skills that he has continuously given instructions in class. I think at the end of the day you'll get what you work for. I got him for art hum in the summer so maybe it's different(?) but overall, if you like a challenging class with a passionate professor who cares about what to teach his students, he's the right guy! If you don't want to risk your gpa even just a little, don't get his classes. Summer Work Load: Class participation 30%; 2 papers 15% each; some papers he requires but would not be graded; and in-class final 40%

Jun 2014

I was shocked when I came on here to see the most recent reviews of Tina, so I thought I would offer my experience with her. Pre-assigned to ArtHum in the fall as a freshmen this year (as a former visual arts student in high school), I stuck with the class. Everyone told me it would be good to "get it out of the way" as one of the pesky Core classes all students are required to take. I had many older friends at universities pursuing degrees in visual arts who hated their art history classes, so I wasn't too optimistic. I was so pleasantly surprised! ArtHum with Tina was an incredibly fantastic and inspiring experience. She began the course slowly taking two classes to go over Roman/Greek art easing us into the class as most people in ArtHum don't have experience in the subject area. She then picked up the pace to complete the entire standard curriculum units and an extra unit. She also didn't give any artists/time period more attention than another which some professors in another classes. I thought this was more judicious and allowed for a more comprehensive experience of Western art history. Classes typically included a large portion of Tina lecturing as well as discussion time. Discussions were often preceded by blogging online which was a good way to flesh out thoughts before class and required us to do research on our own. She also commented on some of the posts online too which helped get everyone engaged. I disagree with the comments about her personality/teaching style below. I personally found her a very healthy, wonderful mix of relatable and professional. She speaks eloquently and in depth as she teaches but can also have a very casual conversation before class begins or while on the trip to the MET. The instances of casualness made me more comfortable participating or making mistakes in class, because she didn't seem a distant, serious professor only interested in students who can constantly impress them. The culture of perfectionism and elitism at Columbia can be absolutely suffocating, so I was so thankful for her being a human being I could actually engage. Overall, this was the best class I had first semester and inspired me to pursue art history as a concentration or double major. I never even considered art history before her class, and now I am indebted to her for making me fall in love with the subject. She is a brilliant, charming, and engaging individual that I am so happy to have had. Take her class! Find her at the MET next year when she is completing her fellowship there! You won't regret it.

Jun 2014

I literally never write culpa reviews, but a couple of the reviews for Tina lately seem unnecessarily harsh. I felt I needed to put another positive experience out there as somebody who recently took her class. I won't pretend like she was the perfect instructor with absolutely no criticisms -- nobody is. However, for short bursts of an hour and fifteen minutes she managed to cover an amazing amount of material and clearly was knowledgable about all of it, at least a couple steps beyond what we needed to know for art hum. My biggest criticism, which isn't even big at all, is that since she tried to fit so much material in, it sometimes felt like she was steamrolling through lectures with limited time to entertain questions or comments. Sometimes students would raise their hands to speak, and she said they would have to wait until the end if there was enough time. She was always open to people discussing their thoughts with her after class, though, which was a generous way for her to make up for it. Overall, she was fun, really approachable, and tried to make the class as enriching as possible. It was beyond obvious that she cares deeply for teaching and her students. She has a bit of a "too-the-point" personality, which some people may mistake for rudeness or standoffishness, but if you get to know her, either after class or in office hours, you will quickly see that she is not only a great, effective instructor but someone you wish could be your friend after the semester ends.

Jun 2014

Unfortunately, it seems that Professor Hetherington will not be teaching Masterpieces of Western Art in the near future. This is unfortunate because Anna has been one of the better Core teachers—and, certainly, one of the top art humanities instructors—I've come across. Her teaching was effective and always energetic. Above all, however, she constantly urged students to validate their interpretations about works viewed in class and outside of class by clearly stating and arguing using the visual evidence at hand (an informal version of the socratic method, if you will.) While, at times, this reminded me of high school, I realized that Columbia students, being the quick thinkers that they are, can often overlook the smaller details in their race to develop a sound and insightful conclusion. I saw myself and my classmates do this throughout the first few weeks, and each one of us had to decondition ourselves to be able to build up our thoughts from the basic elements of the work. Anna's focus on our development of critical thinking about art meant that the class did not cover the art-historical context of many of the artists and art work discussed in class. However, I agreed with Anna's argument that becoming adequate readers of art was a greater benefit to us than becoming knowledgeable about the history and context of a selection of 10 artists and their work. For this reason, all of our assignments and exams were, largely, formal analyses, and class discussion centered around extracting the important ideas involved each artwork viewed. If you're looking for an introductory course to western art history with an instructor who assigns heavy reading, lectures a majority of the time, and places more importance on fact recall, Anna's class may not be for you. If you're looking to gain valuable thinking skills about art from an instructor who has a lot of care for your individual experience with art beyond the scope of the class, Anna's class is definitely for you. And I, personally, highly, highly recommend taking her class if you have the chance. You won't regret it.

Jun 2014

If you choose into her section, you need to do whatever you can to stay in it! Aimee Ng is one of the most engaging professors I have ever had in three years at Columbia. She really takes advantage of the small class size to encourage an open discussion. She is an extremely articulate and talented educator. There were times where I wanted to applaud her at the end of a class because it was just that fantastic. You will really walk out of every class feeling like you have learned something new that you could then explain to someone else. The workload is very light. Besides the paper, we only had two out of class assignments. One was to read an article about the Parthenon sculptures, and another was to watch a documentary on Bernini in lieu of a class that she couldn't make (we didn't have to write anything). She breaks the paper (about a painting in NYC of your choice) down into several assignments, which ensures that you don't do everything at the last minute. As part of this, you do a 4-minute oral presentation on your painting/paper topic. You are required to visit your painting once or twice, but this helps with the assignments. She is very clear about the contents of the exams, which are graded fairly. Instead of memorizing dates, you memorize the period/style (eg. Renaissance, Cubism, etc). Studying for the exams was easier than expected because you end up retaining so much from her engaging classes. Please take her class!

May 2014

I had Michael Fowler for Art Humanities Spring 2014 and he is really fantastic. First, the class was at 8:40AM and he still made it fun and interesting to come to every Tu/Th morning which shouldn't have been possible. He covered the material incredibly well: I came in with no art analysis or history experience and thanks to his class I feel confident in my abilities. Our field trips were also really great and well prepared. On top of all this, I was expecting to feel left out of another "western" white male centered Core class but I was pleasantly surprised to see Michael consistently try to bring in other thoughts, ideas, and artists to the curriculum. Definitely gold-nugget worthy and I'm really surprised he doesn't have other reviews.

May 2014

I have mixed feelings about Tina. While I think her past reviews overrated her (I've taken very few profs that are actually 'gold nugget profs' in my opinion), I think the most recent reviews are kind of harsh. Overall, I thought Tina was a pretty good professor, very knowledgeable, fairly nice and understanding -- I just didn't really agree with some of the things she said and she doesn't leave a lot of room for argument with her own opinions. So, long story short, I feel like I learned a lot in this class. I know way more about visual art and art history than I did before I took the class. But I didn't enjoy the class as much as I had hoped to, and I think that just might be because Tina's teaching style isn't really my cup of tea (but that doesn't mean it isn't effective). More specifics: Good: (1) No exams in the class, so it was pretty low stress most of the time except when we had a paper due. Not exactly sure this is a good thing -- three papers are worth 90% of your grade (10% participation), so if you're not a good writer and you prefer exams (easier to regurgitate) you might do better in a different section. Also, no incentive to do the reading if there are no exams ... Tina would get annoyed that we didn't do the reading, but they were helpful but not * necessary * to contextualize the classes. (2) She has a pretty high standard for essay writing and offers revisions, which is awesome. This is one of few classes I've taken (and I'm a humanities major) that I felt pushed to flesh out my argument and figure out exactly what I was saying because she offered a revision for the first two papers (most humanities classes, especially lectures, don't offer revisions, understandably, but this makes improving upon one's writing less critical). I think her grading is generally fair, though she definitely prefers less complex, clearer arguments over more sophisticated, more convoluted arguments. (3) She's overall a really nice, approachable person. She was always willing to answer questions and held lots of office hours. On the other hand, as previously mentioned, she doesn't leave that much room for argument re: her own opinions on the art we studied. (4) Field trips! I personally enjoyed them. Not many classes go to the MoMA and because Tina focuses on modern art she gave us a tour there which I thought was pretty cool. Field trips are fun. (5) She says in the beginning of the semester that the class will be mostly a lecture with some discussion when it's appropriate, which I found to be really great given that my Music Hum prof basically tried to make it a discussion 24/7, which made no sense since like no one knew anything about music. So it was refreshing to have her be honest and upfront that we'd learn more in a generally lecture setting with some interesting discussions throughout. (6) She tries to get everyone to talk during discussions which is cool, especially for people who don't really like talking in class, but in an interesting discussion she basically only lets any person say one thing and then refuses to call on them again, which is... silly, in my opinion. The not so good: (1) She is SO SLOW at grading. I know she's busy cause she's getting married and has a lot of other stuff going on but for someone who's taught the class quite a number of times in the past it seems like you'd think she could grade a bit faster. Also, TurnItIn is really annoying. I get why she uses it (as explained below) but it's still annoying on our end. I had a TA once who graded on his iPad and he did it through Adobe Acrobat PDF so I definitely don't think this is the only option. (2) Honestly, I just don't think I meshed that well with her personality. (3) She has this thing about writing papers, which is basically that art history papers (for us lowly art hum students who know very little about art -- no disagreement on that last part) are less about what we say about the artwork/what visual details we see and more about how we organize these visual details into an argument. In class she said that regurgitating what we'd already discussed over and over in class in our papers was fine, and she was more looking to how we could synthesize what we had learned. This sounds fine and makes some sense, but you could really write a paper and not write anything new that we hadn't discussed in class and it'd be fine, and that's not really how I'm used to writing papers for other humanities classes (like, yes, it's true that we probably can't say anything * new * because we're just students or whatever, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't try). i.e. you could pick two works of art we'd studied, like a specific Rembrandt and a specific Warhol or a specific Pollock, regurgitate every single visual detail we'd discussed in class, but pick and choose which details to include based on a thesis you came up with. I guess it's alright, just again, not really what I imagine paper writing to be. Overall, could have been much worse, and I'm glad that I was in this class -- if you get Tina, you should stick with her, unless you are completely averse to writing papers, in which case, get out.

May 2014

Colette is an extremely sweet, easy-going professor who makes ArtHum actually enjoyable. From the start of our class, she made it clear to us that she views ArtHum as a language course. In other words, she wants us to develop a vocabulary in art and be able to discuss art. For this reason, as previous reviewers have mentioned, there is no memorization required (although she will ask you to identify certain pieces on the midterm, I got a few wrong and was only penalized by a single point in each case). Class participation is probably the most important part of your grade, and what you will be focusing on doing for most of the semester. She barely assigned reading (maybe three articles that I can remember), only had us do one paper early in the semester, and gave us an oral final only because she was required to give a final exam. There was barely any work for this class yet I definitely learned something despite having a background in art history (took AP Art History in high school, considering majoring in it). She makes the classroom environment one where you want to participate and brings in some art and perspectives that aren't on the syllabus to make things a bit more interesting. She's great at contextualizing paintings and bringing in a variety of analyses of them. Colette knows her stuff well and is also a great teacher - I highly recommend her to those who have not yet taken the course.

May 2014

Here are the basics: Extremely down-to-earth: classmate of mine missed two lectures and she gave a private lecture outlining both lessons. Very approachable before and after class for questions regarding papers. Light coursework: just two short papers based on works at the Met/Moma/Gugghenheim. No weekly discussions/posting etc. Goes over each work in class so no real need to do the readings. Tests: gave the essay prompt for the midterm before hand, gave a list of all comparision works we needed to know for the final. Clear passion for the subject, loves talking about various artists and including her personal research. It was a pleasure taking Art Hum with Prof. Brisman and you are extremely lucky if you end up in her class.

May 2014

Unremarkable teacher. She thinks very highly of herself and tries too hard to the point of communicating humor over knowledge. Sometimes her attempts to make art hum "fun" interfered with actually learning in art hum. There are no tests, so you could definitely do worse for art hum, but you could also do better. Also, the essays are graded on a point scale instead of letter grades, which is bizarre for a humanities class, and everything goes through turnitin.com because Tina apparently thinks we're all committing plagiarism.

May 2014

If you want a concise, clear, articulate, interesting, thought-provoking, humorous, stylish, young but highly intelligent Art Hum professor, who is filled with sage insights, who has a PhD from Yale, who requires little more of you than to engage with the art being discussed, Professor Brisman is your gal. If you: - Go to class and museum/cathedral trips - Actively participate in class discussions - Stay up on short readings for each class - Write two thoughtful short papers on works of art you find interesting - Study the major works discussed - Remain open and excited to learn You will not only do great but more importantly you will walk away with a new outlook on life, have a greater understanding for appreciating works of art, and will be able to all around think more critically about other subjects that may have little correlation to this class. This is what great professors do. They may be teaching you about one particular subject, but because art or any discourse does not exist in a vacuum, the ability to step back and place a paradigm in its context creates connections to the foundations of our being. And from that starting line you are left with unforeseen and unanticipated arteries that lead you away from Rome and out into the world to places you had never imagined traveling to. And when you look back, you just smile, because you know your life is a little sweeter.

May 2014

Her knowledge of the works we studied was fair at best. She will tell you at the beginning of the semester that she studies 20th-century art from a "social Marxist" perspective, and it is clear that this is all she's capable of. Her explanation of the Parthenon was elementary and idiotic - ie, "the proportions of the Parthenon are [such and such] because the Greeks cared about balance." Gee, thanks, Wikipedia. She took over a month to grade our essays, to the point that we got one essay back a day before the next one was due. She was always ready with an excuse about how "crazy" this semester had been for her. She also seemed to think she was young and cool, and overshared details of her personal life - did I really need to know that she met her fiance online? No, I did not. I have never written a CULPA review before, but Tina's reviews are so inaccurate as to warrant at least a lone voice of dissent.

Apr 2014

Professor Harrist is the absolute WORST professor I have encountered during my time at Columbia. I have had an incredibly positive experience with every other core class I have taken, but my Art Humanities experience has proven unproductive and superficial. Professor Harrist does not grade work based on the validity art historical concepts, rather he chooses to focus on the grammar and syntactical structure of the work. While this, in theory, is productive, he does not offer constructive criticism to improve your writing, rather just tears apart your work and expects you to accommodate to his stylistic preferences. When it comes to exams, he apparently prefers quantity over quality writing, which contradicts his obsession with concision in essay writing. I do not mind receiving a bad grade in a class if it means I am actually learning from the mistakes, but that is not the case in this class. If possible, avoid this professor at all costs.

Mar 2014

I find her to be an engaging professor. She's in grad school, and so is working on a lot of her own things, but always finds time to email back promptly. I found her treatment of Las Meninas (which we just covered) satisfactory, if not particularly thorough. Despite her youth, she's rather skilled at directing in-class discussions, which is something that not many humanities students at Columbia can claim. I"ve found that in the midst of drafting my first essay, I ended up using a lot of terms that she would use during class, and incorporate many of the ideas that she suggested, as she is really good at getting students to analyze art critically and from different angles and modes of looking. I was surprised to find that I actually enjoyed this class, having come in on the first day with low expectations. The workload, already pretty manageable(one 3-4 page paper, one 6-page paper, a midterm and final), is made even lighter because she doesnt emphasize AT ALL the memorization of names and dates. What she does emphasize though, is the importance of paying attention in class as every day she'd introduce some new idea or technique. The readings, though they can be long, are lightly touched upon in class and usually you can contribute to discussion without having looked at them beforehand, though I would recommend at least skimming them while preparing for her midterm, which asks you to compare and contrast series of pairs of paintings with brief evidence drawn from assigned readings. I highly recommend taking her class.

Jan 2014

I dont understand why Professor LeRoux does not have any more reviews than this, she is amazing! She does not require you to memorize any dates, paintings etc. As she views memorization as useless. She is very approachable, has an interesting teaching style and does not assign too much work. As long as you put a little effort into this class and participate in the class discussions(very important), this should be an easy A. I dont normally like art classes, but I loved this one because of LeRoux!

Jan 2014

"I would just like to point out that there is a man sticking a flower into this man’s anus…don’t say we never had any fun in Art Hum.” -Chiong on Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights God, I love this woman. She clearly loves what she does and her enthusiasm translates into her being impressively prepared, well-versed, and so so knowledgeable. She’s beyond eloquent, passionate, and NICE (such a nice person). At first she may seem intimidating and too serious, like a real hard-ass, but fear not- she’s truly a wonderful lecturer and professor and sometimes spontaneously hilarious (see above quote). This isn’t to say she’s an easy grader or gives out easy tests. Far from that, her tests are fairly challenging, and the papers graded with substantial expectation. However, the tests are always fair in that they come from the slides (except maybe one in which you have to analyze on spot, but you can do it) and she does a thorough and captivating job in presenting the works and relevant concepts. There are readings, but you don’t have to do them. There was one pop quiz though so if she hints at reading something, read it, duh. Go to class, pay attention, take notes, and mind what she says. She summarizes the readings for you and you can use this in your midterm/final answers and pretend you read it. Class is a blast anyway. She has a way with making things easily understandable for someone who has no art history background at all. And don’t forget to participate at least once. She’s so supportive and open so don’t be afraid to say what you’re thinking or wondering. If you want to raise your paper grade, definitely go to office hours. Paper topics are a visual analysis on one painting or a comparison of two and requires a museum trip. I always thought it was fun. Brainstorm something and go talk to her. She loves art so much she can’t help but spew you some answers. If you don’t have time, send her your thesis. She’ll give you feedback. Also, she’s mentioned you could argue anything as long as it’s well argued so she’s pretty open-minded and awesomely progressive like that. You just have to back up your argument with objective points and not things like calling the works “beautiful” “gorgeous” etc. without support. Definitely my favorite professor, definitely my favorite Core class. Challenging but absolutely rewarding. Dramatic to say but Professor Chiong has restored my faith in the Core. Oh exact dates are asked for each work shown on the tests. Eeeek but she's still an art history rockstar.

Jan 2014

Olivia was probably my favorite teacher ever. I'm in SEAS and even I had a blast in her class. The way she taught makes you understand the piece more rather than memorizing definitions like some of my friends had to do in other classes. If you are a visual learner, this is the perfect class for you. We went through many different eras of art. I want to say that I remember more from that class than I do from any other class that I took at Columbia. And what's even better is that I had more fun in that Art Hum class than any other class ever. Interesting thing. So it is now a year and a half since having taking Art Hum with Olivia Powell. I went to the Caribbean on vacation and I met a cute girl who happened to be an art history major at one of our rival Ivy League schools. Well Finally!! I had the most beautiful conversation with this girl about art. She enjoyed sculpture, so I brought up what I had learned about Bernini. This was one of those high society type conversations that I would expect to be able to have after attending Columbia while conducting million dollar business deals. Well, let's just say the rest of the night with that girl in the Caribbean was superb. It wasn't me getting "lucky". It was skill and charm and knowledge picked up through Art Hum. I want to thank Olivia Powell for her AMAZING class. fyi, for any guys looking into art hum classes, Olivia is gorgeous!

Jan 2014

For the most part, Julia is a reasonable and fairly chill instructor. I liked how she established from the outset that the class won't be about memorizing a bunch of crap (i.e. dates, technical jargon) but learning how to look at and analyze art. Each class was structured on in-depth discussions about whatever artist/movement/artwork was scheduled for that day (as would be expected in every other art hum class--no surprise here), and so you would have needed to have done the reading or known something about the art in order to contribute/participate in a meaningful way. Given the fact that the focus of art hum (as are the other core courses) is entirely western/euro-centric, I appreciated how she made an effort to include a token of modern and contemporary artists, some of whom aren't "western," though I was almost always confused about how these artists furthered my understanding of the artists featured on the art hum curriculum. And at certain points of the course I felt as though it would have actually been helpful and more engaging if she had focused on some of the technical terms thrown around in art history. For example, in her mini-lecture on the Parthenon, she kind of glossed over the Ionic/Doric/Corinthian orders (I think she spent like one slide merely mentioning the first two), though I would think these are relatively important architecture terms that need defining. If I recall correctly, she also mentioned chiaroscuro (contrasting light-dark to create the illusion of form) only once in passing; spending even just one or two minutes more on this term would have later helped me understand why Picasso's use of color was so groundbreaking in the history of western art--I had to figure this out on my own while reading Kahnweiler. She was also somewhat biased toward Renaissance and, later on in the course, Spanish baroque painters, namely, Velazquez (btw she LOVES Las Meninas), not that I had a problem with that--I was looking forward to the Renaissance anyway--but she would sometimes use this as an excuse to avoid answering some of our more specific questions. I understand that one can't know everything about everything, but she could at least have told us that she'd get back to us on questions she couldn't answer immediately. A note about testing. I don't know how the other art hum instructors structured their exams, but she gave us 30-ish min to complete the essay portion for both the midterm and final. 30 min to talk about three (and for the final, four) artworks! This ain't the SAT's!!! Her tests aren't impossible, and she's a fair grader--they just might be harder for those who do not have any background on art history (like me). tl;dr Enjoyable class on the whole, though I wish she had gone over some of the more important art terms and given us more time on the exams. If you don't have some basic knowledge of the major artworks and architecture of western civ, take it with another instructor.

Jan 2014

Aimee is a great professor. She knows what she's talking about, and has a very enjoyable personality - jokes a lot, adds in personal informative commentary on artworks, etc. The material is interesting, and she does make her own adjustments to the main syllabus. Her class is also founded on student contributions, so don't be afraid to talk and add in your own thoughtful commentary; she will usually be very supportive of what you say (as art hum is a subjective course). The light workload is also definitely a big plus; no readings, only one class museum trip, and one personal trip for the big essay. As long as you engage and take notes in class, you should be set! Anyone whose attracted to women should beware though, as Aimee is extremely hot and I have found myself unable to concentrate sometimes due to my imaginations. Overall, great class, highly recommended professor!

Jan 2014

I love Aimee Ng. She's really young -- she got her Ph.D. in Italian Renaissance Art at Columbia in 2012, but she inspired me to at least appreciate something about each period. She's extremely well-spoken and delivers each lecture with passion. As someone who had absolutely no art background prior to this class, I feel like I got a really solid overview of art history. Every assignment in the class revolves around a semester-long project: you pick a painting that currently resides in NYC very early in the semester. Then, along the semester, you'll turn in a 1-2 page description of your painting, 1-2 page analysis of your painting, a 1 page thesis/outline of your final paper, and a 5-8 page final paper. Midterm and final have IDs (she makes you memorize PERIODS, not years, which is incredibly helpful) and comparison questions. I don't know about grade distribution yet, but I got an A just by paying attention in class and only applying myself right before the midterm and final exams. One of the best classes I've taken at Columbia (definitely the best Core class). Also she's really attractive bye.

Jan 2014

The funnest course I have had at Columbia so far (as "fun" as a class can be)! Personally, I have never had any prior exposure to art history apart from museum tours on family vacations. But that was not an issue in this class. Professor Ng does not bore you with too many details. Her classes are basically a series of slide shows of artworks, each of which she says two or three basic and interesting facts about, and is very open to a discussion in class. There is no reading. She makes her lesson seem more like a class chat rather than a lecture cause she is open to all opinions. Also, she is very witty and humorous and always grasps your attention with amusing anecdotes about the painter and or artwork. Finally, she is very organized and provides you with clear guidelines on how to go about answering your papers and essay questions etc - and is always available to help in case you need further clarification. I definitely recommend you take this class with professor Ng, if you can!

Jan 2014

Meredith is great. A lot of us came in here having either no prior experience with art history or having taken AP Art History and having ingested its various memes, but Meredith was up to teaching and challenging both groups. In other words, if you have an interest in art history like me, a lot of what you're going to be reading and learning is a few themes and plotlines over and over again: the introduction of illusionistic space into Renaissance painting. Its dissolution with the Impressionists. Rembrandt employed chiaroscuro to, uh, some end, and so did Caravaggio. Meredith isn't so iconoclastic or frivolous as to dismiss these facts, which are, in the end, facts (for the most part). But she's able to teach in a way that incorporates the way a painting -feels-, the way you react to a painting, to what the painter is doing and why that mattered. Her class can often feel like a lot of Q&A (the question usually something like, "What do you guys notice about the painting?") but also usually had the wonderful feeling of something being revealed, slowly, before it all comes together. It felt like art history should feel, in other words. If I had a qualm about the class it was the readings, which were sometimes long and sometimes not, sometimes interesting and sometimes less so, but more than anything seemed irrelevant. I read them voraciously my first few weeks and for the most part enjoyed them, but then realized that the stuff just didn't matter. She barely referenced them in class and never in a manner that would affect your grade (i.e., on a test) had you not read them. I just stopped midway through the semester and my experience with the class wasn't really altered in any significant way. This might read like a positive for those of you less inclined to digging into 30 pages about symbolism in Rembrandt, but sometimes you sorta want this stuff to matter, right? No harm, though. Fluke rocks.

Jan 2014

Meredith is a decent professor. She's taught art hum a handful of times and she definitely knows her stuff. But her teaching of this course differs in two primary ways from the high majority of other art hum professors. Firstly, she stresses staring at a piece or two of art and analyzing it to its core. And I would say this is a good exercise for a beginners art class but IT'S ALL WE EVER DID. We NEVER mentioned the words renaissance, impressionist, expressionist, dottism, or anything of the sort. We never discussed art in the context of history. We never did anything but descriptive analysis and compare/contrast. And secondly comes Meredith's grading. As she made very clear to my class, she was not handing out many grades of an 'A'. She told us that on our first paper she gave half the class a grade of a 'C' and followed that statement with something along the lines of "if you didn't think you could get a 'C' in art hum well clearly you were wrong." On our midterm as well she only gave 4 students out of 22 or so a grade of an 'A' (something that is just not very common in a Columbia Core class). Again, Meredith is a professor who is clearly smart and knowledgeable but at the end of the day if you have the ability to take art hum with a different professor I would suggest you do so. (For full disclosure for those who are curious, I received an 'A-')

Dec 2013

Professor Sivard was a wonderful teacher. She's very organized, clear, and good at getting students to participate. She balances being encouraging and receptive with challenging what you're saying, so you feel comfortable talking in class but know you can't do so vacuously without having to defend what you're saying. This brought out interesting and meaningful comments, though of course you always get Those People who are excessively pretentious without really saying anything at all. Prof. Sivard also had a good approach of questioning the Core's selection of artists/pieces/themes (no female artists, the racism implicit in primitivism, etc) in a productive way, which I appreciated. She's an extremely fair grader, too, and lets you revise your essays for a better grade based on her feedback, which was also helpful. She offered an optional tour of MoMA in addition to her required Met tour, which was helpful for me in becoming a more critical viewer of art rather than just someone who absorbs it. Overall, I feel like I really learned a lot and enjoyed this class a great deal. Highly recommended!

Dec 2013

Ayala is knowledgable, engaging, and kind. She is hugely enthusiastic about Art Hum and the material we were studying, and that enthusiasm for the subject matter really rubbed off on me. While I had never taken another art history class, I really came out of art hum feeling like I knew a lot about the subject. She gives effective feedback on papers, grades fairly, and leads good discussions. Beware, she's not afraid to call on you out of the blue if you look like you're dozing off! The workload wasn't too bad. There are short-ish readings for most classes, although you can get away with skimming most of them. There are three papers that build on one another based on a painting that you actually go and see at the Met. The midterm and final were pretty easy. There's also a tour of the MoMA and St John the Divine—Ayala led our MoMA tour and it was clear she really knew what she was talking about. And there's an informal group presentation at the end of the semester. Overall, if you have the chance, take art hum with Ayala!

Dec 2013

Would DEFINITELY recommend taking Art Hum with Page. Very straight forward instruction, little to no reading. 3 short papers, and a basic midterm and final exam that shouldn't stress you if you take good notes in class. Professor Knox is an incredible instructor, who makes sure you walk away from the class having learned a thing or two about art, and an appreciation for the vast opportunities to experience it here in the city. (While we may have taken one trip too many to the Met, there is no other way to appreciate being so close to the Monets you learn about in class.) Most important thing would be to participate, which shouldn't be too hard given her light-hearted and engaging character. Such a sweet instructor, wish I had more like her! TAKE ART HUM WITH HER.

Dec 2013

Take Dr. Mangone's class. Especially if you have a heavy course load. If you ended up with her through random, time/day-based selection, the universe is conspiring in your favor. I took her class during her first semester at Columbia. Dr. Mangone is incredibly thorough and visibly eager. You will learn a lot. She really enjoys engaging her students into the class and allows for balanced discussion. Looking at works in class, she encourages interpretation based on one's own experience of the work. Readings are light and not really required, as the material she presents in class expands on that of the reading and she values discussion as a supplement. She isn't too critical of interpretations she may not agree with, as some Core teachers can be. She grades papers generously which she counters with more challenging exams, which I honestly think are pretty standard. In papers, she admires creativity and artful language (here meaning an argument expressed and developed in flowery, elegant prose). Lighthearted and kind underscore my general impressions of her as a person. If you want a passionate instructor who is genuinely engaged (and will not make a slave of you as a means of imparting material), opt for Dr. Mangone. As this was her first semester teaching the course, I presume subsequent terms will reap even greater benefits.

Dec 2013

Tina Rivers is the best teacher I've had at Columbia so far and one of the best teachers I've ever had, period. She's an incredibly knowledgeable, thoughtful, and no-nonsense instructor. I actually wanted to do the readings and I turned in the papers early because her class was so wonderful. I had never taken art history courses before and now I'm taking two next semester and considering doing an art history concentration. Tina inspires that kind of interest in what she teaches. I know that if I'd taken Art Hum with a less interesting instructor, I would most likely have skipped most of the work and gotten far less out of the course. Seriously, if you have the chance to take her class, DO IT.

Dec 2013

I can only hope that one day I will be as brilliant, compassionate, hilarious, well-rounded, articulate, and kind as Tina. She not only is the most inspiring professor I have ever had, but she's an incredibly interesting individual. As someone who had never taken an art history class before, or any art class for that matter, I would often stay after class and bombard Tina with questions. She always answered my questions with a smile, and often our conversations would branch into larger discussions of identity, individuality and expression, love, life, and all that cheesy cliche stuff. She genuinely cares for her students, as evidenced by her extensive comments over our papers, her frequent field trips to eye-opening exhibits, her option of re-writing papers for a better grade, among a slew of other things. In our first class, Tina explicitly stated that her goal was NOT to force us to robotically memorize dates, but to teach to be artistically literate. Tina showed us a video about how people flock to museums just take a picture of famous artwork and share it on social media to prove that they "saw a Picasso" or "spent time with Monet." She pointed out that although we are taught to read words, we are never taught to read art. And Tina successfully accomplished her goals. I can actually enjoy the Met now, instead of wandering aimlessly trying to find all the famous works. You're probably rolling your eyes, thinking "ok this is just another anomalous fangirl, and she's not representative of the class opinion." I understand how this review might give this impression. Yet, for our last class, we all got together outside of the set class-time to talk about art, hang out (and Tina bought us all dinner and cannolis!), which testifies to our communal respect for Tina. Really, I cannot articulate enough how much I respect Tina. I am definitely going to keep visiting her during office hours!

Dec 2013

Tina is a fantastic teacher – always interesting and engaging, down to earth and funny, and above all, an inspiration. She is super passionate about what she teaches and communicates that well through her Art Hum class without ever being overbearing or annoying. I appreciated her version of Art Hum because, while she taught the entire syllabus, she also encouraged us to question what it means for something to bed a "masterpiece." The essays are totally manageable and you get to pick your own topic, which makes them super interesting. Her grading is very fair and if you work hard you will absolutely excel in this class. Take Art Hum with Tina!

Sep 2013

Both reviewers below me are spot on, especially the third paragraph of the August 13th review. I don't usually write these, but I just randomly thought about Ms. Helprin again, cried a little, and decided to share my experience. I walked in thinking the class would be a cakewalk - standard two papers, a museum visit, a midterm, a final, and hopefully an A. I ended with a B+ and a lot of white hairs. Before the paper deadlines, I submitted drafts to Ms. Helprin and thought I made some pretty significant changes each time. Not only does she expect you to send in drafts a week in advance, but she ends up giving you extremely unhelpful, vague comments that leave you more confused than when you started. I'll admit, she did happily give paper extensions, but that would honestly just drag on the agony. Expect to spend hours of brainstorming for her ridiculously difficult comparison prompts, write incredibly well-thought-out papers, rewrite them completely with little direction, and get a grade that leaves you feeling hopeless about ever improving your ability to analyze art. Art Hum is not supposed to be this difficult. Do yourself a favor and switch out of her class.

Aug 2013

She is probably the best teacher I've had at Columbia so far. I didn't expect myself to be so awake for an 8:40 am class. She made all the discussions interesting and relevant to our every day lives. When I told her I was a SEAS student, she decided to incorporate the mechanical aspects of art and architecture into the discussions. Kori knows how to keep everyone engaged and she will go out of her way to make sure you know the material. And we even got to paint in one of the classes. Her enthusiasm is infectious. Honestly, if you get Kori as an arthum professor, consider yourself very lucky.

Aug 2013

Professor Litt was my absolute favorite professor my freshman year. As a SEAS student I was very skeptical going into art hum but it quickly became my favorite class thanks to her. Class discussions were always lively, intelligent, and informative and I felt like I left each class with a new way of thinking. She was great at encouraging students to participate in discussions and opened my eyes to new ways of viewing art and the world in general. Her assessment of my papers also helped improve my writing ability more than any other teacher I have ever had. She must have spent at least an hour on each draft of each essay per student, it was clear she cared about both our writing and content and worked to help us improve. I saw my own writing improve significantly throughout the year and my excitement for art grow. Art Hum was a fantastic experience for and I wish I could take her class again. (Did I mention she's hella cute?)

Aug 2013

I got a B in Art Hum, but not because Ricky is unreasonable. He expects you to do your work which entails coming to class and participating thoughtfully, reading prior to class (though relatively short, the reading assignments were often dense), and writing three to four short papers (we had two 2-page papers and one 4/5-page paper). Now and then, we had media assignments (these are meant to help you visualize and remember) on the Art Hum website. While I wouldn't say this class is easy, the workload is doable. If I didn't have an overwhelming semester, I think I could have gotten an A. Ricky is a fair professor who expects you to do your part. He is not heartless. Also, I loved his professional demeanor.

Aug 2013

I agree completely with the last reviewer. While I am not one of "those guys" with an above 4.0 GPA, I have taken humanities classes in the arts where the Professor tells everyone that he has never before given an A+, and I get an A+. My point is, I like to think I know a little bit about writing academic essays. For the final paper I wrote about one of my very favorite artists and pieces, and thought it was one of the very best short essays I had ever written in my time here at Columbia. But, lo and behold, what do I get: an A-. You know, I'm not someone who regularly complains about A-'s, but this just killed me. Completely unexpected and demoralizing when you are so very passionated about a subject. On top of this, "Professor" Helprin is one of those stereotypical humanities teachers who just gets so giddy when you mention the words "Power" (a la Foucault) and "Colonialism". She also doesn't mind when students basically turn to ad-hominem arguments during class conversations (e.g., someone calls someone else a "Neo-Nazi", "Fascist", "Racist"), as long as its followed by something vaguely reminiscent of a post-modern defense of Pop Art. Sometimes Columbia can be a horrible place.

Jul 2013

Before I begin to write this review, I want to mention about my previous GPA. Yes, I am one of those guys with above 4.0 GPA. Simply avoid her with all your effort. First, I originally registered in Prof. Fucci's class but Columbia substituted Prof. Fucci to her for some reason. To be honest, her class is a very interactive. She tries to encourage everyone to participate, and tries to listen everyone's comment very carefully. But that's all. The point is, we are not paying tons of money to Columbia, to have conversation on art with a random phd student. Normally, she couldn't give any clear answer to students. Whatever the students ask, she goes "well... I don't know." ........ Her grading is super random and clearly unfair. Many people fixed their essays more than couple of times, she still refused to give an A, and she normally gives really underestimated grade for the participation as well. She tries to deducted every possible score from your grade. Once again, avoid her, especially if you are on the track for premed, law-school and MBA . She is an obstacle for your great dream.

Jun 2013

Professor Wamsler is one of the best professors I have had the pleasure of interacting with. Her method of instruction keeps you engaged and interested in the subject. She's a warm and welcoming person, and her knowledge with Art History is impressive. Before this class I had not taken an art class for 8 years, nor did I find it interesting. I have to say my attitude did a 180. If you are lucky enough to find yourself in her class, stick with her, you will not regret it! I'm glad I took this class. Grade: A.

May 2013

The perfect Core professor: incredibly smart, loves his subject, friendly but not chummy. He'll keep his distance from students to make sure everything is always focused on the work; once, he sent us home 20 minutes early because it was clear no one was listening and he didn't care to waste time. He's tough but loves the discussion, and will do his best to make sure everyone gets a turn. I adored this class because he was so effective at teaching it.

May 2013

Christina is an excellent teacher. She's very approachable and easy to talk to and has a good sense of humor about art and about life in general. Her lectures were always interesting and well planned out. She normally allowed just the right amount of time for class discussion and did a pretty good job of involving the quieter students and limiting the more loquacious ones (which was no easy job in our section). That said there was no pressure to participate if that's not your thing. Just make sure you go to class and take good notes. Christina gives a bit more work than other Art Hum teachers -- there were 2 ungraded one page assignments early in the semester. But I really believe she does it because she wants her students to be better prepared for the graded assignments and exams. She definitely has high expectations as far as writing ability, so those who have said she's a tough grader are correct. If you're a math or engineering major hoping to coast through art hum, she's not going to give you an easy A. Also her exams are challenging -- totally fair and totally doable, but not cake. However I think she was pretty generous in her grading of exams (at least the midterm, haven't seen my final grade yet). The reading for this class is minimal. After the midterm I stopped reading altogether, and I don't think it really mattered much. Everything important is covered in the lectures. Also some earlier reviews mentioned having to memorize dates. She must have changed her approach because we were only required to know an approximate date for each artist. She's primarily interested in your ability to do visual analysis -- there's a lot of "comparing and contrasting." Overall I'd say stick with Christina if you get her, unless you're a weak writer. If you're actually interested in art you'll enjoy her class and if you're not you won't hate it.

Feb 2013

I agree with the previous reviewer. Andrew Finegold was unimpressive. I enjoyed the readings and discussions amongst my peers but I didn't think Professor Finegold added to them in a meaningful way. He brought little enthusiasm to class, didn't connect very well with students (and seemed to make little effort to), and overall came across as someone who did what he had to as instructed by his department chair/higher ups but didn't go beyond that. And after having a Music Hum instructor who did go above and beyond--who really taught with passion, put herself out there for students, and added personal issues of interest to the curriculum, I realized just how underwhelming Professor Finegold was. He wasn't terrible and you could certainly do worse, but that's not really saying much. And in discussions with friends in the same class, it was clear I wasn't alone in not thinking this.

Feb 2013

Professor Minturn is AMAZING, if you have him for Art Hum you are INCREDIBLY lucky. He's brilliant, he's funny, he's filled with interesting stories, he's passionate, he wants you to do well. If you have no previous art experience, he works with you to help you learn and do well. He's the best professor i've had at columbia so far, and he made me fall in love with art history (which I would have never expected in a million years). Take Art Hum with him, you won't regret it. He assigns the best reading, and he knows so much about everything especially Jackson Pollack... you'll learn so much... he's the best.

Jan 2013

I echo the previous reviewer’s sentiments -- Michaela is an awful professor. I cannot think of a single student who had a positive experience in her class. I will concede that Michaela, a Harvard graduate, is extremely smart and well qualified to teach this course. However, she is snarky, malicious, and arrogant – a fellow student described her as the reincarnation of pure evil. She treats Art Humanities as a Ph. D. level course and expects far too much from her students. Clearly not having learned from her past mistakes, during one class she gave out her cell phone number to several male students in her class (including two football players) and told them to text her. While Michaela may appear outwardly nice, she is in fact extremely obnoxious and elitist. On one occasion, she emailed all the students one of the papers she wrote during her time at Harvard undergrad, bragging that it was selected as the best paper in a large class. Furthermore, she said that we students are “kidding ourselves” if we expect to get an A-range grade on our final paper at an “ivy league, world-renowned, top-notch university” without first consulting art history books. These books are hidden deep in the recesses of Avery Library and I would not be surprised if they have been untouched for decades. Avoid Michaela like the plague if you want a positive experience in Art Humanities. The only positives about the course are that Michaela regularly lets class out early and cancels class every few weeks.

Jan 2013

Meredith is a decent art hum professor. I don't think she deserves a gold nugget, but she is definitely not a bad choice for art hum. She is a fairly engaging lecturer and does well at facilitating class discussions. However, my criticism of her consists mainly of her grading methods and expectations of her students. She is a very critical grader when it comes to papers and exams. When it comes to her exams, quantity is valued over quality. The more you wrote, the better your grade. Though this is supposed to be a survey of western art history, she seems to expect her students to be able to analyze art at a pretty high level and remember every detail stated in class. Fairly standard art hum class.

Jan 2013

Great teacher, responds to every student's comments and guides the conversation into really in-depth discussions of the artwork. Engaging and interesting to listen to. Interesting assignments that allow creativity and make you think. At times we would talk a piece to death, but there is value in doing that too. The midterm and final are pretty straightforward. Also we took two field trips, one to the Cloisters and one to the Met. She held multiple times so it was easy to find one that fit our schedule, and even then it was not mandatory. Meredith made my arthum experience extremely worthwhile.

Dec 2012

Christina is a tremendous lecturer and incredibly enthusiastic every class. Not only does she give great lectures (with the right balance between information and student participation), but she also makes sure to thoroughly research any questions she can't answer in class. Her tours in the museums are captivating (with the option not to go to one, and always the possibility to go a saturday or sunday) and she will always meet with you. However, if you are going for an easy A class, this may not be the right fit for you. The A is possible, but you actually need to work for it: do most of the readings, participate every class (stay awake/ don't text) and show a genuine interest in the field. She is a tough grader, but if you work hard throughout the semester, you should be fine. I'd advise everybody to take her class, the progress you make and things you learn with her as a teacher is worth all the hard work she pushes you to do. Honestly, you won't regret taking her class.

Dec 2012

Drimmer is awesome. Incredibly nice, enthusiastic and clearly an expert in her field. She works very hard to make sure class lectures/discussions are enjoyable and clear. One of my favorite professors at Columbia. It is clear she genuinely cares about all of her students and enjoys teaching. I came in expecting to just tough it through art hum, as I had no genuine interest in taking the class, but came out feeling very appreciative. If she taught another art class, I would take it. Only quasi-complaint is that the lecture slides are very bare - essentially just pictures of the artwork. This makes note taking during class very important in order to be prepared for exams. Also as an added bonus, she is really good looking. Highly, highly recommended - she should be a gold nugget without a doubt.

Nov 2012

The previous review deeply saddens not only because it simply looks like an angry kid who didn't get the grade they wanted but also because it doesn't reflect at all the kind of teacher Julia Siemon is. When writing these reviews surely your own sense of injustice shouldn't seep through? I had studied art history for two years before college, and had a great skepticism when coming into Julia's art hum class but by the end of it, I was very much impressed by the simplicity in her approach. She just made you look at the art. So many of the works are and will continue to be bound up by the essays and books that surround them and often weigh them down but she managed to get us to look at them personally and see the works as themselves before looking at the art historical scriptures. In the first class I remember her questioning key assumptions that have been engraved in our minds such as "why do we think bigger is better" (re: the parthenon) which I think even the greatest professors often forget to bring up. She managed to revitalize a core class and solidify what it is to study such a subjective topic as art into a personal connection and curiosity. To me she was innovative in her language when talking about art and didn't regurgitate the overworn associative language that grad students and professors both, often fall into because its the easy way out. Julia also was approachable and simply talking to her afterwards to discuss art was just as enjoyable as the class She also tries to get to know the individuals in her class, and what does show through is how much she cares about the class, even making the final a take home because of the late time our class was held.

Nov 2012

I had Julia for Art Hum my freshman fall and as an Art History major, I was initially a little skeptical about taking an introductory course - but Julia opened my eyes to looking at the hallmarks of art development in completely new ways. She was clearly extremely knowledgeable and a natural teacher. She was young and yet managed to both treat her students as equals in the learning process and also command respect and seamlessly guide us through new concepts. I cannot recommend taking this course with her enough!

Nov 2012

Ok I have no idea what the previous reviewer was thinking, he must have been the kid that sat in the back of the class picking his nose the entire class or something because JULIA IS AMAZING!!!! And I’m not saying this just to say this, she really is (trust me). Julia completely brightened my semester in the midst of a really hard semester filled with math and science classes. She is the professor you have come to Columbia for, honestly. She challenges your thoughts and makes you think about art in a way you had never thought about before. I tell all my friends that if they are able to switch into her class to please do because you won’t regret it. I remember I went to office hours a couple of times and every single time she helped me with my essays and allowed me to write sophisticated and intellectually enticing essays, that I never thought I could write before. If you are in her class, consider yourself lucky. I wish I could take more classes with her (and I’m not even an art major). She gives minimal amount of reading, which most of the time help you to know background information. She will teach you not only art itself, but how to write and think about art, which are things that I had no idea how to do before coming to this class. She deserves a gold star, no joke.

Nov 2012

I couldn't disagree more with the review below. It was my experience that Julia walked a very fine line, and did so with great success, between holding firm on the scholarship and encouraging broad participation in a classroom of students with widely divergent experience, taste and knowledge of art. Most importantly, she was accessible; she was able to draw students into the conversation and to provide them with a sense of how to step into the world of art, how to gain some footing in an area of scholarship that many people are quick to say they know nothing about. She was also tremendously helpful and always willing to supplement the lectures with other notes and discussion; she was a great resource in drafting the final paper. And at the end of the day, she is cheerful, knowledgeable and generous, which is just about all you need to be a successful teacher. If I ever get the chance again, I won't hesitate a minute before taking another of her classes.

Nov 2012

William is very nice and knowledgeable about the field of Western Art, however, his essay preferences unfairly disadvantage students new to the field. I found that before coming to Columbia, most of my classmates attended private schools that exposed them to the canon of Western Art, including how to write about art. I did not go to a private school and had never taken an art class before, but then again, there is no prerequisite for the course anyway. This apparently, didn't matter to William, who often thought my vocabulary wasn't diverse enough to merit high grades on my papers. I was never told that my arguments weren't effective or that my papers lacked proper grammar or structure, but was constantly informed that because I didn't use enough "different words" that my work was subpar. This stylistic preference seemed to be the sole determining factor between an A and a B. Also, I approached William and asked him to explain the concept of symbolism in art to me. I listened to his feedback and even wrote down what he said. I then wrote my essays on the midterm according to this information, and still received a subpar grade. Because of these experiences, I feel William's class privileges those students fortunate enough to attend a private school before coming to Columbia, and leaves the rest of us out in the rain.

Nov 2012

While the review below may seem over dramatic, I have to agree with its overall message. Tom Campbell was indeed a bit of a diva. At first I thought I was going to really like the class. It was discussion based and he did a good job of encouraging most people to speak. It seemed really laid back and chill--exactly what I wanted from an Art Hum class. But then it took a turn for the worse. Campbell missed probably 6 sessions in the semester. This meant not rushing but skipping many important artists. This almost defeats the purpose of Art Hum altogether, a class that is based on seeing how artists work off each other. Campbell, in a noble attempt to promote discussion, would agree with anything anyone said. Sexual themes in the Renaissance work? Sure! Why not? Disgust for commercialism in Monet? Of course that's valid! I felt as if we were getting away from what the artists actually wanted to convey because of his interest in everyone speaking. Soon people were thinking depictions of David and Goliath were supposed to be charged with sexual connotations. Then there was the grading. Campbell's feedback on the papers was confusing. I spoke to my classmates to try to decipher what he meant but none of us could see how to improve. After seeing him during office hours, I did exactly what he suggested in my next essay but to no avail. Look. When a student goes into see you during office hours and you give a suggestion and she does it, you are supposed to bump her grade up at least a little bit. Perhaps most telling, when I went to talk to him about preparing for the midterm he mostly rushed me and seemed like he wanted to get the hell out of there. Finally, frustrated, he told me "it's just Art Hum okay. You're taking it way too seriously." Disinterested, and confusing. A class by Tom Campbell

Oct 2012

It was painfully obvious she was desperate to play the role of "brilliant professor" who was supposed to "open your eyes" to the unknown but marvelous world of art; but it fell flat and was painfully easy to see through. As a result of her need to compensate for some kind of deficiency, she assigned very bizarre and tiresome assessments (most notably the final), and felt the need to elevate herself with harsh, picky grading. She fails to make assignments clear, which unfortunately, you get penalized for in the end. Just another grad student who wants to play the hard professor, I suppose. Many of her analyses were wrong or so forced that you had to accept them with hesitance. They were very strange, unconvincing, and dubious. In a futile attempt to be uniquely insightful, she'll give you artificial analyses that will make you think "Ehh, I don't know...but if you say so..." (Books I read gave contradictory analyses so it was confusing when I was trying to study.) You could draw a picture with your left foot, and she would feed you the most ridiculous but superficially artsy analyses. If you knew anything about art, you'd see she's a fake, but apparently many are impressed by her. Disregard this review if you please, but you have no one to blame after getting a hard-earned B.

May 2012

Jessica was really cool! I think what's best about her is that she really understands the purpose of this class and does a great job at adapting the material to our subpar level of understanding of art while still keeping it interesting. I also loved her dry sense of humour which made classes go by really quickly. She's very willing to talk to you outside of class if there is anything that you are interested in and want more information on. If you get her as an instructor you should definitely stay in her section. She uploads all her lecture slides online, but they only consist of the images themselves so you should take notes of what you think is important, but since the class is more about gaining a sense of how to evaluate the properties of artworks and compare them to each other than about details, it's usually fine if you just pay attention.

Apr 2012

Honestly, Rob was one of the best teacher's I've had at Columbia. I'm not that into art and would never, ever have taken an art history course in college if it wasn't for the Core. Rob, as he asked us to call him, is a real honest to God teacher: you can tell he likes teaching and that he wouldn't rather be cloistered away in the library studying 17th century Dutch prints (which is his speciality). Rob's greatest asset in my mind is that he is willing to engage students and in our section this allowed for really interesting conversations to develop. I would honestly do the reading in order to participate, which I think demonstrates how engaging Rob made class. (I don't do this for my other classes...) What I also found incredibly appealing is that Rob isn't stuck up and lost to critical theory / post-modernism. This in no way means--and should never be taken to mean--that he isn't a scholar. That was very clear, he really knew his stuff and was very intelligent. He just wasn't always spouting off about Foucault or talking about dialectics (whew!). I also like that he would sneak in prints whenever he had the chance, which is when you really saw his passion for his speciality. However, he was just as compelling on late 20th century works! Honestly, every class I walked away feeling like I had used my brain (and learned something about a masterpiece artist). That doesn't even really happen very frequently in my major. My expectations for Art Hum were pretty darn low. I was hoping to just not fall asleep and BS my way through the compositions. With Rob as a teacher this isn't an option, but for only the best reasons. Give Rob a silver nugget! Take his section if you get the chance!

Feb 2012

If you get Prof. Joseph, you are in good hands for Art Hum. The class is pretty easy and really interesting. He follows the standard Art Hum syllabus (this year he's director of the program) from the Parthenon to Warhol but his lectures are what make the class unique. He emphasized the elements of artistic styles like most sections do but tended to contextualize them in their social/historical context. Examples: how Impressionism's voyeuristic depiction of women related to the growth of bourgeois urban space in Paris or how the Parthenon enshrined notions of Athenian greatness through contrast to 'the Other.' He involves the class a lot though too in discussions, so it's not just him lecturing. There is a reading required every week more or less but you can skim them. What really made this class nice, though, was the grading format. There was no midterm or final exam but instead four papers on different pieces of art at NY museums. Because of this, you can just listen in class and not worry about remembering the name and year of every painting, and use the skills gained in class to write the papers.

Feb 2012

I had Rachel as my Art hum instructor in fall 2011. I basically knew nothing about art history coming into the class, but I learned a lot and plan on taking many more classes in the department. She's a fantastic lecturer and the readings weren't bad at all. The material gets way more interesting near the end of the semester when you hit Pollock and Warhol. For the first two papers, she gave us a list of works to choose from and write about (if you wanted, you could propose any other relevant work as long as it could be tied back to concepts we learned in class). For the third paper, we could write about any work. I really loved the flexibility she allowed with our topics/thesis choices for our essays -- I found that it was enjoyable and engaging to do research about an artwork that truly interested us. Overall, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Jan 2012

I thought that Huffa was amazing. Yes, he seemed more interested in the modern art, but that is his specialty, and he did a good job of researching and presenting the earlier artwork thoroughly. He encouraged class discussion and led highly informative field trips to the Met and the MoMA. Honestly, I don't really understand the negative review. He was never late to class this semester, and was constantly engaged and on top of the material. He encouraged us to go to exhibits on our own time as well, and recommended specific exhibits and relevant books to us as we developed our papers. Art Hum was definitely one of the better Core experiences I've had at Columbia, maybe the best.

Jan 2012

Julia is the jackpot of Art Hum teachers - entertaining, inspiring, yet still fairly easy. I was hesitant of the class as it met so late into the evening, but from the beginning, Julia kept me on the edge of my seat, always entertained, often inspired. She has a way of seamlessly weaving art history and artworks into these fascinating, grand narratives that kept me on my toes, excited for what works were going to pop up next. I was often left speechless at an end of a lecture, after some incredibly poignant point or another. With Julia, it's not about dates and other trivial information, she truly teaches you to view art in a more nuanced, a more critical, a more interesting way. I feel I can engage with a painting or sculpture so much more deeply after this class, something that Art Hum aims to do but not always achieves. She teaches using the Socratic method, and forces you to back up the points you make. The questions she asks are not hard, per say, but they do challenge you to work through your thoughts and thus develop better, more complicated ones. She deserves a gold nugget for wringing so much out of the syllabus, and teaching new ways to look at the world.

Jan 2012

Dr. White is an amazing professor and a wonderful person. I echo all the earlier reviews that sing her praises - she really does deserve a CULPA gold nugget, anything less than that simply doesn't do her justice. Like most of the earlier reviewers have mentioned, I entered her Art Hum section with absolutely no knowledge or appreciation of art history and have emerged with a new found passion for art of all mediums, and art history in general, that I never thought I was capable of. Dr. White is incredibly patient and understanding, and despite the fact that she is clearly very brilliant and passionate about art, she never once talked down to us even when we occasionally made less-than-intelligent or inexperienced comments about the works we were studying. She made sure that everyone's comments in class were somehow relevant, and even when someone occasionally felt he/she had made a stupid comment and tried to retract it, she always very thoughtfully tried to make that student feel better by highlighting the relevant points of the comment to the work, and by assuring us that art was always open to interpretation in any case. She was very adept at facilitating discussion and directing it, always making sure that it was of a suitable length and that we came away from each work with the most salient points about it. Also, while she's clearly a very experienced Art Hum lecturer, I appreciated the fact that she always managed to keep her lectures about the artists and periods fresh, and that she clearly enjoys interacting with her students, maintaining a friendly relationship with us as she does laugh at/with us sometimes at funny incidences (good-naturedly, of course!) Having said that, I would say that her class is probably pretty demanding for an Art Hum section and a core requirement in general. The day-to-day workload isn't so bad, with just a couple of readings for some artists and three 5-page papers throughout the semester that require you to visit museums, and which take some time to write if you want to produce good analysis. The midterm and final exams are where you feel the brunt of the course's rigor, since we are required to memorize over a hundred works of art, their artists, their dates (+/- 5 years) and the significant stylistic aspects of the work for the exams, that include IDs, a comparative essay, and a thematic essay (for the final). The midterm was relatively manageable, with only a handful of artists/works being tested, but cramming for the final was pretty brutal. I would definitely recommend studying a few days beforehand for the final since its somewhat cumulative. All things considered, though, Dr. White is a phenomenal professor and a really kind, caring person - the kind of teacher you dream of having in college who changes your perspective on your life and opens new windows for you that you never even realized existed before. I'm definitely thinking of taking more art history classes and potentially pursuing a concentration in it after having her as a teacher, and will also (as I told her at the end of the semester) scour the directory of classes feverishly every semester to see if she teaches any art history classes other than Art Hum in the future!

Dec 2011

This class is how art hum should be. Chill, non-intrusive, and yet thought-provoking and informative. O'Rourke runs class in an organized manner, and rarely straight-up lectures. Instead, her class is very much discussion based. She never shuts down ideas, and is careful to add context without asserting her own opinions too strongly. The result: twice a week, you sit in class, stare at art, and talk about it with a resident expert. She requires very little memorization on tests, as her aim for the class was to develop formal analytical skills. The papers she assigned were actually fun to write, each requiring you to explore the art scene of the city in some way on your own terms. So if you find yourself signed up for this section, do not fear, for you have found a good one. Easy in a good way, and one that I think I'll miss.

Dec 2011

Stephanie was a fantastic Art Hum instructor. She was passionate about the material and could clearly articulate important points about each work of art/artist or movement in a succinct, understandable way. Yet she never let her insight into the material hamper class discussion; she was arguably more interested in hearing what the class had to say than lecture for the entire class period (which is probably why class participation counts for a whopping 25% of your grade). Class was hardly ever boring, either--she has a skill for stimulating discussion and making you genuinely interested in whatever material we're studying. In sum, she's extremely approachable, at times cheeky, and overall a reasonable and great instructor. Consider yourself lucky if you have her!

Dec 2011

Julia is young, but speaks with commanding maturity as well as charismatic energy. She teaches classes in a way that is almost suspenseful, and has a powerful way of unveiling and exploring key moments and connections in the material (which is Western art history from Parthenon to Pollock). Going in, I was slightly worried because I have little (as in no) artistic background. And this may be why I appreciated Art Hum with Julia so much - she taught in a way that continually inspired interest, never made one feel alienated or hesitant to try, and ultimately encouraged one to intellectually stimulate ONESELF. This is the best quality a liberal arts teacher can have. It strengthens you, your peers, and your learning capacity. Before I knew it I would find myself reading up online about architecture movements, agonizing over who was more godlike between Michelangelo and Da Vinci, gathering and adopting different perspectives on the Elgin Marbles... You will do well in Julia's class if you have good speaking & writing skills, have the patience to look at and think about a bit of art, and are not afraid to genuinely engage yourself in what is really not a nightmarishly difficult course. If you're planning on scraping by, be warned: Julia does not eat bullshit, leave space cadets uncalled on, etc. She's not a hardass, but just not some pushover mother goose who will gently lullaby you if you are not taking her/the class seriously. She is actually nice, sometimes joking freely and poking fun at herself. She maintains a balance between pleasantry and intensity. If there is one agreeable downside to Julia - by which I mean a potentially problematic upside - it is that, speaking objectively, she is the most attractive teacher I have ever seen. I imagine it would be torturous to take this class, do badly, and feel like you got Avada-Kedavra'ed by Emma Watson. Same goes for taking this class if you have a girlfriend but know you are prone to developing crushes. If you think one of these grisly fates could befall you, then maybe you should steer clear!! I am half joking, half serious. If you genuinely work and genuinely enjoy, you'll have nothing to fear in Art hum with Julia. There are plenty of good Art Hum teachers, some probably even better, but anyone who's had Julia should know that she is more than worth it.

Dec 2011

Dr. White was absolutely amazing. If anyone deserves a culpa gold nugget, it's her. Art Hum with Dr. White was an absolute pleasure. She assigned typical amounts of art hum work (aka not very much at all). She conducted class with about 70% lecture, 30% class discussion and visual analysis of the works on the projector. I normally don't love when professors lecture for so long, but Dr. White's commentary was always interesting, relevant, and helpful. I really feel like I can look at art and understand it/talk about it intelligently. She is incredibly easy going, sympathetic, and relatively flexible if you have any issues/need an extension. Dr. White led the classroom gracefully, starting on the first day with the assumption that none of us knew anything about art. That said, she didn't treat us like kindergarteners, but rather let us start with a blank slate. It was nice to be able to come in to class and earnestly ask questions that you might be embarrassed to ask in other classes. She praised any and all participation, and guided our class discussions so that they were actually productive. After taking her art hum class, I'm definitely hoping to take more art history courses in the future - I just hope I can get another prof like her!

Dec 2011

(Not sure why it says he's a TA...but,) Patch is an excellent, excellent, excellent ArtHum instructor. He is incredibly chill, quite funny, down to earth and very engaging. He has that amazing ability of pretending that anything you say is worthwhile even when it's clearly not, and he doesn't particularly care whether you do the readings or not. ArtHum isn't exactly the most stimulating or interesting curriculum, and yes you will probably be bored at some point or another, but since you have to take it, Patch is definitely the guy you want to have as an instructor. Definitely worth taking this class with him. He's a gem. Do it.

Dec 2011

Rob is a pretty nice guy and creates a pretty relaxed class environment. He does a good job of making everyone feel comfortable no matter their background with art. Class can get a little boring here and there, and he sometimes struggles to create a good class-wide discussion, but I usually found class pretty enjoyable. Given the very reasonable workload (see below) and his lenient grading standards (at least from my perspective), consider yourself lucky if you're placed into his section. Note: He's particularly interested in art history, so he spends a fair amount on the lives of the artists. That could either be good or bad depending on your preferences.

Dec 2011

I've never written a review on culpa before, but I had to because Eliza has been my favorite teacher at Columbia thus far. She kept the conversation interesting and worked really hard to involve everyone in the class. She especially worked hard to bring everyone's interpretations into agreement with the wider picture, thus making it impossible for anyone to give a "wrong" answer. She was incredibly personable and knew how to make the material fun and relevant to everyone, even those without an explicit interest in art. In meetings, she was understanding and easy to talk to. Most importantly I feel that her class was not about memorization, but about intellectual exercise. Talking to other people in the class, it sounds like most people shared my opinion on her.

Dec 2011

I really liked having Patrick for Art Hum. He's really really enthusiastic, and his dry sense of humor made class pretty enjoyable. He was open to student comments and suggestions and seemed to genuinely want to hear from us about what we thought of the class. His technique for facilitating discussion was the only aspect I found lacking. While this may be standard for Art classes, he pretty much asked the same questions about each work at which we looked. (what's happening here? what are the formal elements?) It's totally possible that this is what all Art Hum professors do, but it wasn't really working for me by the final weeks of class. He's a fair grader. I felt sometimes his comments didn't match up with the grade I got, but the grade was usually higher than I thought it would be based on the comments, so hey, that's fine with me. He really wants you to learn about and respect art's journey from the Parthenon to Warhol, and that is a great quality in a teacher. The workload is fine; there are two formal analysis papers, a midterm, and a final project where we got to create our own art exhibit (actually fun). If you get Patrick, stay in the class! You won't regret it. He might not be the absolute best Art Hum teacher, but he is FAR from the worst, and you'll learn a lot.

Dec 2011

Amazing Art Hum professor! He really knows his stuff and is very clearly hugely into art. I enjoyed every class and all of the field trips, and this is coming from someone who never was interested in art in the slightest before this class. Rob is one of those people that draws you in simply by virtue of his own passion for the subject matter. Plus, he knows the ins and outs of the Met, and is actually friends with a lot of the employees there, so we had great access to the reserves. Highly recommend!

Dec 2011

Colette was awesome. She has a great lecture style, good comments, and very relaxed. I learned a lot about her course and the best part about it was that she de-emphasized memorizing useless facts like specific dates. She cares more that you understand the time period that the artwork is in, which to me is much more important when it comes to comprehending and interpreting a work of art. She was a fair grader. I guess I wouldn't call her an easy grader but as long as you know how to write an organized paper, she's completely reasonable. I really enjoyed this course.

Dec 2011

Nick doesn't seem to have an agenda in mind when teaching and comments about artists seem to be related but not really important. I know this is part of the core, and a mandatory class, but I would have like to see something more substantial added by the professor. I do not feel I've learned the least about art history despite this class. Lectures are always tangential and do not add much beyond what the average viewer can see. There isn't a sense of coherence of building upon previous history in most of the classes. I'm not really sure I left this class with more than I had going in. Then again, if you are looking for a mind numbing class that doesn't take a shitload of work to do well (you will have to read at least some articles for a paper) and doesn't require memorizing artwork or dates - maybe Nick is for you.

Nov 2011

Dr. White is incredible. I have no idea why she would go from a gold to a silver nugget. If you have the chance, take art hum with Dr. White. I have no background in art or art history, and I loved her class. I felt like I really learned a lot from her, just by showing up to class (I rarely did the readings, since they weren't really stressed.) She made class enjoyable, relaxing, and interesting every time. Dr. White strikes a perfect balance of lecturing (on artists' backgrounds, biographical information of the pieces, etc.) and facilitating directed class discussion. Before this class, I had no idea what to think or say when looking at a piece of art. Now, thanks to Dr. White, I actually enjoy going to museums. Besides her great teaching abilities, she is just a really wonderfully kind woman. Dr. White is understanding, friendly, and relatable. TAKE HER CLASS. i wish i could again!

Nov 2011

Absolutely loved his class - one of the best professors I've ever had at Columbia. He is clear, fair, and a wonderful presenter. I am in SEAS and learned so much from this class (despite thinking I would struggle through Art Hum). He is also funny and makes class enjoyable. He will make humorous comments about the pieces of art that stick with you and make you really remember. It is really easy to approach him with questions whether in class or out of class about paper topics, etc. He began the semester by saying his goal is to get us to learn how to talk about art. In other words, he really wants you to LEARN (which is why is first paper is ungraded, it's supposed to just get to learn how to write about art). A good initial summary of a painting, for him, is literally "there are three people - a man and two women - the man is in front and holding flowers..." a very very basic description, then he will lead you towards the more advanced ways of thinking about art.

Nov 2011

Ellen is great--she's really nice and she tries to make the class interesting and relevant, sometimes even going into what her own research is about, which is really fascinating given the relatively dry nature of the course. She's relatively laid back and doesn't really require you to do the readings, though I would suggest you do because they tend to be interesting and sparse anyway, but she can be a tough grader on the papers. Her midterm is relatively easy, but I would suggest that you put a lot of effort and thought to the formal analyses. And meet with her! She really appreciates you trying in class.

Nov 2011

Get me out of this section!!!!! What a diva! And z-lister! HORRIBLE LECTURER, does not post powerpoints, makes you read wayyyyy too much for class about random background about artists (which he will not touch upon/explain) and expects you to know random knowledge to regurgitate for class/midterm in class. 10 minutes for dual visual analyses? Parthenon versus Amiens? Really? I'm not an idiot, but I think that's pointless and a waste of time to dedicate 10 minutes to compare the two. Kept on resending PPT of images to know for midterm "image carousel" and really not on top of his little effort needed to put into the class. Didn't even show up to administer his midterm, or explain why he didnt't! (Another doctoral student came to give it.) Paper grading/responses is ridiculous. The first one was on the Elgin Marble Debates -- should Greece retain the statues or not? Ummm...that's not what the goal of Art Hum is about...and he basically wanted us to regurgitate the Jannette article back to him. Seriously, if you are a PhD student here at Columbia, learn to post basic stuff on courseworks, and show up for exams. And don't ask your section to meet AT THE MET for the class fieldtrip..instead of meeting on campus and leave from there. Everyone definitely will teleport there at the same exact time...WHAT ARE YOU THINKING?

Sep 2011

Please take this course with Julia. Granted, it is much less intense over the summer than how she teaches it during the fall. However, if there was ever a teacher who could keep you interested in slides for three hours at a time, in the dark, during a hot summer afternoon, it's Julia. I am not a humanities type of guy, and I still found a lot to like in this course. A little effort goes a long way, as she is there, above all, to teach, which unfortunately can be a rare quality in instructors these days.

Sep 2011

Anna was the best combination of sweet and intellectually stimulating. I highly recommend taking her class; all you have to do is show up to class and engage in discussion here and there. She really encourages you to use your own vocabulary while making observations on various pieces. While she has plenty to say about any single piece throughout the course, she moves things along at a good pace. Her personality keeps the course from becoming a monotonous art history slide show.

Aug 2011

Rebecca is a GREAT teacher, although it seems like she is still experimenting what's the best way to teach an art hum section. But give her a break! She's a grad student--and a good one too. She is not only extremely knowledgeable but also very amiable. I am so grateful that I had Rebecca as my Art Hum teacher, because I had neither knowledge nor interest in art before I had her but now I actually know/like art! The way she teaches is as follows. She prepares powerpoint presentations for every class, which were neatly done. She frequently refers to outside sources such as clips on youtube, the MoMA website, etc. Not only is this fun, but it also allows us to actually see and think for ourselves rather than to just look at some paintings and memorize some dry info. If you see yourself registered for her section, you should be glad and NOT switch out. Just make sure you go to class. Sometimes it's boring--of course, its a friggin core class--but you do learn a lot. And make sure you show at least some effort to participate. It can be BS, but she'll take into account how you're trying a lot. For me, I missed only one class, went to all the museum visits (just 2--to MoMA and to the Met), spoke a few times every session, didn't take notes AT ALL (She explains well enough), and still ended up with an A.

Jul 2011

During my time at Columbia, I have noticed that there is a large portion of the student body that thinks it is ok to show up to a class 10-15 minutes late. If you are one of these people, DO NOT take a class with Anna. She gets sincerely upset with people who do this. Otherwise, I cannot recommend her highly enough. Her classes were some of the most interesting I have had here, and I left it with a real appreciation of art I did not have coming in. She doesn't waste your time with meaningless readings. She only assigns something outside of class if it is actually important. She runs a great class and expects total participation. Moreover, she meets with everyone before handing in papers. Great Class.

Jul 2011

Irina was amazing! I recall the first day of class she casually mentioned that she's taught Art Hum more than anyone at Columbia, and it truly shows. She is so knowledgeable, so helpful, and she really makes an effort to get to know you personally. I was dreading Art Hum because I thought it would suck, but she made it one of my most enjoyable classes at Columbia. I always wanted to go to class and the periods flew by because they were so good. We went to the Met with her, and she gave us a tour. She's the best tour guide I've ever had. One time she had to cancel class because a guy committed suicide on the 1 train that day and it was too disturbing.

Jul 2011

Mark is the best professor I have met so far. He is good at teaching, he knows the stuff of the class, and most importantly, he truly cares about the students. He wants to really communicate with us, and he successed. He is very considerable for students' need. When I ask for discussing my paper with him, he not only agreed, but carefully read my paper before we meet. The discussion turns out to be very helpful for me, and I really apperciate his efforts. He also brings us a new perspective to art. I was never good at drawing but I like appreciating art. Through learning from him, I got to know how to look at art in a critical and analytical way, and found the possible message the artist is trying to convey. In general, Mark Watson is an outstanding and excellent professor, and I feel really lucky to have taken his class.

Jun 2011

this class wasnt that bad. you need to memorize a lot for the midterm and final but you should be fine if you study a couple days in advance and pay attention somewhat in class. the papers werent terrible either since she is willing to help you a lot on them. she edits your paper right on the word document for you and tells you all the corrections that you need to make.

Jun 2011

Fantastic! What can you say except that she's an amazing teacher. She clearly knows her stuff and makes this class extremely enjoyable. If you ever have any questions or clarifications on assignments, readings, midterm etc, she's always willing to put in the extra effort to meet with you and talk. She absolutely made this class more enjoyable than any other Core class I've taken. The readings can at times seem long but if you get into them, they're really enjoyable. She knows that very few people are going to be engaged by tediously boring material, so all the readings are interesting, even if you don't have any inclination for art. Besides knowing her stuff, she's super friendly. She held a pizza/movie night at the end of the semester and is really just great to talk to. Definitely take this class with her!

May 2011

Kevin is really fantastic. He is incredibly brilliant and somehow manages to be totally humble and approachable. Whenever he didn't know something (which was rare as he knew about almost everything) he would just tell the class he legitimately wasn't sure and he would look it up and get back to them (which he always did). I found it to be a striking quality in someone so smart and it seemed to make the class respect him even more. I'll confess that prior to this class, I really didn't care for any of the artists in the Western Canon other than Monet, but I ended up really loving the class, and subsequently many of the artists. Kevin is a great teacher, and he manages to make all of the material interesting and relevant (when possible). I also developed a genuine interest in Bernini, Michaelangelo and Warhol, artists who I would probably not have appreciated, were it not for the in depth information and explanation that he provided. The expectations for the midterm and exam were made clear and all of the information we needed to know, was provided. I always appreciate this, as I tend to write down literally everything the instructor says and try to memorize it all, which is both time consuming and frequently unnecessary. We were responsible for a lot of images, but they were provided well in advance and I found this to be incredibly generous and helpful. Anyone would be lucky to have Kevin as an instructor as he has a lot to offer and makes it possible for you to really take away a lot from this course. I think, if you are willing to put in the work (which it seems like everyone was, as he made it pretty fun) you can be successful academically and learn a lot.

May 2011

Finding out you got Irina as your Art Hum professor is like winning the lottery, so congratulations if this is you! I am a math major who has little interest in art coming in and this was by far my most enjoyable class this semester. I've never taken an art history class before so the whole lights-off / lecture-slides-on style was a trip and I loved it. I thought her lectures were really interesting as were the class discussions. As some previous reviewer mentioned, she spins every student comment into a useful contribution. This is great positive reinforcement, and it made everyone unafraid to speak up. On top of that she's just a really friendly and positive person. If there were an optional Art Hum II that she taught, I'd take it in a heartbeat. I can't compare the workload to other Art Hum profs; it seems most Art Hum classes are pretty light in workload anyway. But it certainly felt very light in comparison to the average class. In the first few weeks she assigned readings and would ask about them in class. But after that she really didn't assign any readings. Before the exams she emails us a list of the specific readings to know (usually around 7 or so) and what to know from them. So aside from the first few weeks, you don't have to do any readings until right before the exams, and even those were usually short and straightforward. There were 4 essays, of which you could choose 3 to do, or you could do all 4 and your lowest grade would be dropped. Two of the essays were 4-5 pages, one was 2-3, and one had no restriction in length. I wasn't a huge fan of the essays, they were kind of unusual and to some degree required creativity. For instance one was to find a piece of art and write a "catalog entry" as if you are a gallery owner who is trying to sell it. So there is a bit of research involved, but also a little bit of role-playing. Anyway, they weren't hard except for writers block you might have in the creative aspects of them. The exams were really easy if you don't miss any lectures. Both midterm and the final have the same format: the first part is identification of 6 works, which you have to give the title, artist, year it was made (within 10 years), and answer a short question about it (which is always something from lecture). Then there are comparisons (2 in the midterm, 4 in the final). And finally she gives three essay questions, of which you can choose one to answer. I can say right now that you DO NOT have to take any notes in lecture in order to prepare for the exams. She posts all the lecture slides for you to study dates, but the identifications really aren't hard since she doesn't pick anything obscure and the range of 10 years makes it really easy (most of the artists fall within a 20 year band anyway, so you just need to know one or two dates for any given artist). And everything that you need to know to answer the questions you will remember from lecture or will be from the readings that she specifically tells you to read before the exam and what themes to look out for. You don't even need to bring a pen or paper to class. Just bring yourself and your favorite soft drink; get comfy and enjoy the show.

May 2011

Anna is an AMAZING art hum teacher. For her, the point of the class is to get you to be able to look at art and think intelligently about it. There is absolutely no memorizing in terms of dates, artists names (and spellings) or titles of works for any of the tests. She calls on people in class to get everyone to participate and always finds a way to make your comment seem relevant. She's also super responsive to emails and goes out of her way to make time to talk to students about their papers/whatever.

May 2011

SJ is truly an awesome teacher!! She is such a great presenter of information because she loves what she teaches and it shows. She is very open to opinions on art because this is obviously a survey course, but she also teaches us about aesthetics, formal analysis, and relating past artists to current artists, which is extremely useful. Her personality really fits the class, because if we had a boring teacher, people would not be as inclined to learn. Her spunkiness and intelligence is a great combination. I highly recommend SJ.

Apr 2011

Thanks to Elizabeth and her excellent teaching of this course, I feel a lot more solid about concentrating in Art History. The discussion that she promotes while we go over the various works on the Art Hum syllabus helped me to better understand and evaluate art. She also knows a lot about the different artists and works that we study, so she does her best to make the material interesting to even the most skeptical, but like the reviewer above said, it can get boring sometimes. If she's doesn't know the answer to a question that a student asks, she's not afraid to say that she doesn't know. She'll even take the time to find the answer and post it online on the class wiki. She also posts other helpful and interesting links for us, in case we want to know more about whatever we're studying. If you need her help understanding some aspect of the material, she's willing to meet with you to discuss whatever issues you're having. She even offers to read drafts of our essays and provide feedback, which is especially helpful if you're having difficulty with what to say. Elizabeth is an excellent professor and I really enjoyed her class. Definitely try to get into her section if you can!

Feb 2011

SeungJung is incredible! Her upbeat attitude, relatable humor, and obvious passion for art made my Art Hum class so much fun. The best part of the class were the field trips, hands down. We went to the Met (twice), the Frick, toured Trinity Church and the historic architecture of the financial district, and--THE BEST--watched Impressionist art being auctioned off at Sotheby's auction house. The field trips, most of which were optional, got practically our entire class out of bed on Friday mornings--an impressive feat. At one of them (I think the downtown one) SeungJung even bought us lunch. The class itself was also great. SeungJung usually taught by putting slides up on a projector, giving us some background information, and then allowing her students to talk about the art. She isn't shy about interjecting when it's needed or helpful, but it doesn't feel like a lecture at all. SeungJung's Art Hum also brought the kids in the class closer than any other class I've had yet at Columbia. I think it was a mix of the field trips and how laid back the whole atmosphere was, but at the end we basically all were in love with each other. That's a class dynamic I like!! Take Art Hum with SeungJung (omg almost rhymes). You will love herrrr...and the class!! Seriously just DO IT.

Jan 2011

I thoroughly enjoyed the class with Tina. Apart from a very personal & friendly attitude, she explains art in comprehensive, easily digestible way often making her classes quite fun as well. She's very open to discussion and variety of opinions. The bottom line is: everyone knows ArtHum is the core requirement. There are those teachers that will make it hard for you because of that, and there are those that will make it fun and as stress-free as possible while still interesting and academically challenging. Tina opts for the latter. Highly recommended

Jan 2011

Professor Fitle is a very nice person who genuinely likes art and wants to impart that knowledge to her students. However, she spends way too much time on some artists and completely skips over others. She teaches this course like an art history class - learn about technique, subject matter, for tests memorize artist/title/medium/date/description. She does not have a lot of control over her students. I was in a class with a lot of know-it-all art history and architecture majors that insisted on interrupting each other and the teacher constantly to impart their "invaluable" knowledge. I did not come away from the class with a new way to look at art and go, "ooh, now I can sense this differently than before" or "I now know how to properly look at art." So too bad for that. However, I did learn a lot about some very famous and/or important art movements and pieces. On a recent trip to the National Gallery, I was able to sound intelligent as I told my friends about various pieces. This class takes several trips to famous art museums. The teaching section of the trip is okay, but real treasure is walking around in the museums afterwards. You've already made the big trip to the east side and now, you get to spend time in the Met or the MoMA or wherever you are. It's amazing to see all of this work up close and in real life.

Jan 2011

Tina is an incredibly effective teacher. Her art hum class was my best experience with the core. She transformed what has the potential to be a rote core class into something tht felt both current and necessary. She is young and "cool" so she gets how to connect with her students, but also super super super super super smart so no information is sacrificed due to her trying to be the fun teacher. Her lectures were always well prepared. She never faltered for lack of knowlege about an issue. And her tatoos are pretty sweet. Take this class.

Jan 2011

Tina is fantastic in every respect—dynamic and engaging with course material while expertly managing the line between being approachable personally and impressive intellectually. Would recommend her Art Hum course to anyone (I took it having absolutely no experience with art history and a lack of interest in the subject which Tina's enthusiasm and solid presentation quickly changed). Her modernist bent means that she's thankfully liberated from stodgy art historical dogma and is able to put things in neat and sensible perspective. Can't say that her class is necessarily easy (at least by art hum standards) but Tina makes it so that the work isn't a burden and is actually meaningful to you, no matter your area of study.

Jan 2011

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Jan 2011

I disagree with the other reviews; I had Noam this past semester for Art Hum, and I thought he was excellent. I wasn't really expecting a great teacher for this core class, and am not particularly interested in art, but after taking this class my interest was sparked. The classes went by so quickly. He is clearly very passionate about the subject matter, and would pace eagerly back and forth at the front of the room as the discussion progressed. Discussion was definitely geared toward a certain end, although he was generally pretty understanding of other interpretations of the works that might not have been on point with his understanding. He was very patient, and encouraged everyone to speak, since participation is such a large percentage of our grade. It wasn't like those teachers who say they'll make everyone participate and then fall through; he would always make sure everyone in the class got a turn, and wouldn't let just one person dominate the discussion (most of the time). Doing the readings is helpful for participation, but not necessary. All in all a great guy who genuinely wanted us to enjoy the works.

Jan 2011

I must say that I'm surprised to read more than 1 positive review of Andrew Finegold. Granted, he's certainly not terrible as an instructor. But he's very wooden and does little to make the class interesting or engaging. If you memorize slides and regurgitate the information back on tests you should be fine, but he brought little creativity or enthusiasm to lessons. Compared to friends in other sections who had equally little background in the subject, I got much less out of art hum with Andrew Finegold.

Jan 2011

Anna loves (and knows) her stuff. It's really refreshing. Although she calls people out in class, she never makes anyone feel bad if they have nothing much to say. She was extremely open to communication and would basically break her back to meet up with you and make sure everything is taken care of e.g. 1-on-1 essay help, micro-managing everyone to meet at the Museum, holding a review session dinner in EC, etc). She's a sweetheart.

Dec 2010

I was slightly saddened to see Prof. White demoted to a silver nugget from a gold, but I suppose it makes sense. I loved ArtHum and I think that I learned so much (from knowing pretty much no art history to being able to analyze and appreciate many more styles) but I do think that it was might have been too much work for a core class. The papers were graded pretty harshly, I think. I was able to scrap an A on the last one, but that was after I slaved away for days trying to write it. Ironically, I sacrificed time on a term paper for another class to try and get my ArtHum paper up to snuff. The term paper I also got an A on, despite it being twice as long and me spending 1/4 the amount of time on it. That being said, Prof. White is extremely willing to give feedback and help you out. Even the night before the paper was due, she read it over by e-mail and gave me extensive edits right on the paper. I don't know the extent of visual memorization for other arthum classes, but it did seem a little much. I have a pretty good visual memory so I was able to memorize everything the night before for both the midterm and final, but I can see how it would be extremely difficult and overwhelming for others. As far as class itself is concerned, I would like to reiterate what previous reviews said. Discussions were very open and Prof. White always encouraged any type of comment, and never talked down to anyone. I made some less-than-intelligent comments in class but Prof. White always managed to make it seem worthwhile. She did bring candy to class a couple of times and also bought us pizza on one day. However, it became increasingly harder for me to stay awake. Although Prof. White is very interested in the content, the dimmed lights and her soothing voice were not conducive to staying awake. In conclusion, she is a extremely caring professor who honestly wants to see everyone succeed. I couldn't agree more with what one previous reviewer said: I felt guilty when I thought I wasn't giving my best for the papers. Perhaps not the best choice for anyone just hoping to get ArtHum out of the way, but so worthwhile for getting the most out of the class. I got an A, so the hard work does pay off.

Dec 2010

I took Arthum as a freshman so I was in a class of people with previous (and often extensive) background in art history. I had never taken an art history class before this and so it was a bit intimidating at first participating in class discussions. But Christina was wonderful! Her commentary on the art is very concise, and when she solicits feedback from her class, she's quite encouraging with our responses, even when the artistically inclined portion of the class obviously thought otherwise. On the first day of class, she asked everybody to describe their art/art history background. I had the impression that Christina encouraged people who didn't have that background but showed relatively more skepticism towards those that did, even when their comments were vastly more insightful. I thought she did a superb job getting everybody to participate regardless of what you knew about art before class. I definitely learned in that class. This ArtHum class teaches you how to approach art and arms you with the language to describe your observations. Christina is extremely articulate and I was/am really jealous. This might be because she's a graduate student whose life must be dedicated to reading artistic criticism, but she consistently and effortlessly distilled the crux of the artist or art in her commentary. I recommend you take thorough notes during class because the language she (and your classmates, if you end up in one where the people are experts on every possible medium in art, like mine were) uses becomes valuable for the essays. So back to the scary artistic classmates. I got the impression some of them weren't as impressed with Christina because of the "stock" art we studied (Parthenon, Raphael, Picasso, Warhol, etc. etc.) and because her interpretations were relatively conventional. I don't think that's her fault, because ArtHum is about introduction to art history catered towards people like me, who don't have the background. Even though my class very easily could've handled unconventional or radical interpretations or w/e, Christina kept the class along the curriculum and close to its purpose. Overall, Christina is a wonderful teacher for people who come into the class with 0 experience in art. And for those people who want to walk away from the class knowing how to do some basic but legit visual analysis.

Dec 2010

Lorenzo was a really good instructor. Instead of making you memorize every single name of paintings and other works seen in the course, he focused on skills which are actually useful in real life, such as visual analysis and identification of features. He was very open to participation - though sometimes the consequence was that students made unrelated comments - and provided very detailed feedback. Globally, it is was an enjoyable experience and I definitely learned a lot. Although I was already interested in art - which wasn't the case of all students - now I can understand them within a certain framework, so I'm glad the next time I go to a cocktail party I will look smarter.

Dec 2010

Professor White is incredibly sweet and very intelligent. She tries really hard to get people to participate and make class interesting, but despite her best efforts it still kind of drags on. She's a pretty fair grader (although I never managed to get above an a- on a paper) but I did think that her midterm/final involved way too much memorization of dates, mediums etc. The Met trips were fun and interesting. Overall a good class and I learned a lot, but definitely more work than I would have liked to have to do for an art hum class.

Dec 2010

Do not be fooled by Emerson Bowyer's easy going appearance. Yes, he did come 10 minutes late to our midterm, nunning the first tones of Beethoven's 5th and saying: "My god you guys, are you nervous? I was up all night worrying about how you would do! ... Just kidding, I went to a drag show.". We also did not get any longer in the curriculum than Monet. And the strictly necessary workload is pretty manageable. Yet, I have never filled more booklets than I did on our midterm. I have never taken such sheer pleasure in writing assignments. And regarding the curriculum, I'll use Emerson's own words when it became clear that we would not end anywhere near Andy Warhol: "I said this was a class about learning how to understand visual expressions. Now you do. Now you can go to any of those artists on our curriculum and figure out what they were about for yourselves." If you get the chance to choose ArtHum instructor, choose Emerson Bowyer. And if you see this, Emerson, I sincerely hope you will act on your promise from our last class and meet us all for a drink or two!

Dec 2010

Professor Catterson was the most incredible, passionate and knowledgeable professor that I've had at Columbia. She enthusiastically imparted her love of art and history to everyone in my Art Hum class. She was able to engage everyone in the discussion about art and really forced me to think critically about art history. Our class visit to a museum was one of the most enlightening experiences of my Columbia career. Additionally, the research project was thought-provoking and challenging, but I really enjoyed it. Professor Catterson was very supportive in finding a topic of interest and guiding my research. I have utilized many of the tools that I learned in Art Hum for subsequent research papers in other courses. After completing Art Hum with Prof. Catterson, I pursued two semesters of independent research projects with her. Prof. Catterson constantly inspired and encouraged me to think in a creative way and pursue research in an active way, until I had completed all possible research on a topic. I would highly recommend Prof. Catterson to anyone who is looking for an engaging experience!

Dec 2010

Professor Bowyer is by far one of the best professors I've had at Columbia. He is by no means a traditional boring art historian- instead, he really encourages critical discussion and opposing viewpoints. He also knows everything about everything- Met tours with him were like having a private expert take you through the museum and talk about everything within arm's reach. He is incredibly energetic and enthusiastic in the classroom, and really does an amazing job of explaining things, giving background, and encouraging discussion. He also very approachable, and very willing to help students out with deadline extensions and more information. Even if you don't consider yourself an art person, it would be impossible to take this class and not get something out of it while also enjoying yourself. The workload was entirely manageable, and actually interesting because there was so much room for individual ideas and interests. Honestly, the art history department and core could use more professors like this one.

Dec 2010

I took stephen murray's arthum class and it was amazing! stephen murray really makes the core curriculum everything it is idealized to be. He really finds a way to engage every single student. Even if you think you don't like art, you will after this class. He's so knowledgable about everything in his awesome british accent--especially cathedrals and architecture--but he never makes you feel ignorant/unprepared. The best thing about him is that he's not some lame professor; he's travelled all around the world and experienced his area of study first hand. He's really open to all suggestions and loves to hear about student's lives and opinions too. If you're some kind of art history major you should definitely take his class because he really does everything he can to help. The last day he offered us all advice, rec letters, everything...sadly no one in my class was actually an art history major, but I almost wish I was. Overall, awesome class, inspiring teacher.

Dec 2010

I have never had a more supportive, enthusiastic and engaged teacher than Professor Catterson. She constantly inspired and encouraged me to think outside the box and pursue topics in an active way, to pursue a topic until my research opportunities were completely exhausted. I originally had Professor Catterson for Art Hum, a class I was excited about to begin with. But with her creative insights into the pieces of work and her inside scoops on the lives of the artists, art from as far back as the Parthenon came to life. My paper topic on Bernini proved to be one of the most fascinating research experiences of my life: Through Professor Catterson's constant encouragement, I explored Italian estate records and inventories in the basement of Avery library in order to disprove that the Bernini in the Met wasn't really done by Bernini. I then took two semesters of Independent study where Professor Catterson's creativity served as a driving and guiding force behind two equally fascinating research opportunities. But outside the classroom, Professor Catterson makes sure she is a continuing available resource to her students. When I studied abroad, I bothered Professor Catterson for recommendations for different cities I visited; she would reply with encyclopedias of what museums and cheese restaurants to visit at what time with which discounts. I recently visited Italy with my sister, and Professor Catterson dedicated two days of her time to show us around Florence and give us a backstage pass to the great works of art there and the city's culture. I HIGHLY recommend taking Professor Catterson, in case you couldn't tell. She's an incredible teacher, has an inspiring mind, and is a great resource and friend for life.

Nov 2010

Nicole Griggs is a great professor. She is very accessible to students outside of the classroom and is always willing to take more time to answer questions or just discuss art in general. Nicole loves art and it shows. She was a bit of a tough time with sticking to the syllabus, an artist that we were supposed to cover in one class often is covered in two, but nothing too bad. Class is largely based on discussion, which can become frustrating to some people. She will ask what you think about a certain piece and give minimum input about it herself. However, from what I can understand, that is her goal: not to tell you what to think, but to make you figure it out for yourself. The midterm is based on IDs and comparisons of paintings studied in class.

Sep 2010

Art hum with Anna was a lot of fun. This was a summer session course so each class was about two hours and could drag at the end, but she managed to keep it pretty interesting. She worked hard to engage everyone regularly, which was both good and bad. Good in that she's probably supposed to try and get everyone to participate, but bad because several people in the class really didn't have anything interesting to say. Overall she managed to steer things into a lot of interesting conversations, and seemed to genuinely enjoy when we came up with interesting ideas. Several times we threw out ideas and she said that she hadn't seen things that way before but liked the idea. There were two papers, and she was willing to read drafts and give feedback/edits before they were due. I sent two drafts of the first paper and she turned them around in 48 hours which got me an A. She also marked up the draft I sent her of my second paper within 2 days. Overall she was enthusiastic, approachable, and genuinely loved to be teaching the material.

Aug 2010

Professor Grewe is awesome. Her art hum class was the most enjoyable core class I have taken. She can be a little intimidating. On the first day of class she gave a speech about how she doesn't care if other Art Hum instructors give less work and that she refuses to post her slides and prefers that we go find the artworks on the website, etc. and this in combination with the fact that she is very tall and has a strong German accent scared about 4 or 5 people out of the class. But! it turns out there was a completely manageable (in fact, practically easy) workload for the class. The lectures were very engaging. She calls on everyone, whether you want to be called on or not. She is very good at making even the driest points of Art Hum enjoyable and she creates good conversations in class. Also because she calls on everyone and everyone has to talk in class, you get to know your classmates better than most other classes.

Aug 2010

Great professor, great course. Professor Ullmann is knows his art inside and out, and makes the class interesting. He is a fair grader and extremely accomodating. His final is EASY. Just show up to class on time, say a few things, and you're good. Take him up on his offer to meet before essays since sometimes his prompts are a little unclear-he also gives great advice and genuinely wants his students to improve as writers. He is laid back and just makes the course enjoyable.

Jul 2010

Taryn was absolutely wonderful to have as a teacher. I took Art Humanities during the summer, so she had the difficult task of cramming the course into eight weeks in two hour class sessions. She really values discussion, even when people are not comfortable with the subject material. Anyone can have an opinion as long as they are willing to defend it. She also really encourages field trips. We visited museums five times (including the Met, the Cloisters, and MOMA), and each experience was wonderful. Taryn is a superb lecturer, and she really shines outside of the classroom. We also visited Christie's in order to gain a sense of what artwork is worth. If you get Taryn, feel very lucky. My only regret is not getting a chance to do her famous Pollack project due to summer time constraints.

Jun 2010

Pr. Guerin is simply awesome!!! She's extremely intelligent and competent in her field. She makes the class a lot of fun and the material studied interesting and memorable. Although learning all the dates and names of the works can be a pain in the neck, especially for the final, the stuff is very interesting and, besides, I believe, she makes a pretty good curve for both of the exams. Just attend the class, do your work, ask questions if you have them, and you will do great!!

May 2010

I completely disagree with the previous reviewer. I enjoyed art hum with Huffa greatly and I believe most others in the class did as well. I did have reservations in the very beginning because Huffa seemed to be not at ease with the materials and also because architecture history in general was quite boring to me, but as soon as we started talking about sculptures and paintings, Huffa was very engaging and I found the materials very interesting. Huffa does like to pose open-ended questions to class, but this is a discussion-heavy class (CORE!) and I enjoyed hearing what others had to say about the paintings. Also, almost everyone participated at some point or the other, which is also nice. At times, the comments did become creative (stretching a little bit too far), but this did not happen that often. Also, I think this precisely is the fun of interpreting art in a discussion setting to begin with. The anecdote the previous reviewer provides is very misleading. The misinterpretation of the subject matter in the painting of Judas should not be attributed as Huffa's lack of preparation for the class. For the first class, Huffa asked everyone to send him a favorite painting, and he prepared a slide show so that each person could introduce him/herself when the painting showed up. The person who picked this particular painting was either not present in the class or did not know what it was really about, and Huffa(as well as the entire class) had to guess what was going on in the painting. He clarified the confusion in the next lecture, and I think it is unfair for us to expect Huffa to know every single painting (one obscure medieval painting on Christianity) that was present on the slide show. Of course, he could have looked them up beforehand just in case such thing happens, but this is not and should not be representative of Huffa's overall performance in the class. I do agree with the whole late issue. Huffa did show up late to class a couple of times (esp. rainy days), which was unprofessional, but most of the times, he was ready to go when the class started. He was also pretty late in giving back our papers and midterm. Our third paper and final was kind of crammed in the end... but honestly, it was not that bad. It was annoying in the beginning, but, at the same time, this is a hipster guy whose name is Huffa. Give him some slack. Overall, this class might not be ultra-cool and mind-blowingly-amazing kind of class, but it still is far better than the average core experience. He also provided many optional field trips that were fun. I absolutely enjoyed the class, and I don't think you should worry that much if you get him for art hum.

May 2010

She is very nice, knowledgeable, and an encouraging instructor. Though she is relatively new to the realm of teaching (she is a grad student), she is a very promising professor and I am sure will keep improving (though she is already skilled. I enjoyed the course. It is your basic survey of western art, and her emphasis is not on needless memorization but formal analysis and building your knowledge of works so you can really appreciate art and speak with confidence about pieces. Though I think her expectations and workload were a bit above the average, I think that's a good thing overall. Her comments are well received and will help you beyond art hum, especially if you are studying a field in which attention to detail is of unparalleled importance. If you have a chance to take a course with her, do it, I think she was generous with grades at the end.

May 2010

Great class. Before the final, he told us that for the test "90% of success is showing up." I'd say that also applies to Jordan Bear's Art Hum class. His slides and lectures are clear and well prepared and though he tries to foster class participation, he isn't crippled when he gets no response. He also acknowledges that Art Hum covers a ridiculously large period of time and tries to give context to the larger art community surrounding the specific artist on the syllabus for the day. The readings are interesting but not totally necessary - there is text analysis on his midterm and final but from showing up to class generally you can figure out the artist being written about and go from there. All in all I learned a lot with little stress.

May 2010

Julia is just amazing as an instructor. You never know what you will get in the core classes but I have to say that she is BY FAR the best core instuctor I have had the entire time at Columbia. She is so engaging that you really get involved and learn to enjoy even the art that you never liked before. She teaches you a new way to look at it to see value where you didn't before. I loved art hum and regret that I took it so late in my undergrad career leaving me unable to partake in future art history classes. Although I had no previous knowledge about art history or analysis, I really enjoyed going to class each time and learning something new. It was fascinating to hear about the progression of not only the artist himself but also the progression of art through the times. Julia was an effective and engaging lecturer who actively engaged her students. Her constant encouragement and enthusiasm for art allowed students to confidently believe and explore their own analyses. Everyday I came to class wondering what amazing new artist I would learn about especially because Julia's presentation was always very well prepared and intriging. Because of Julia, my only regret now leaving Columbia is that I did not take Art hum sooner, though I suppose I would not have had her if I did. She is a jewel. If it's any consolation, I now will approach museums with more enthusiasm and the greater ability to appreciate art.

May 2010

Jordan Bear is solid - at least silver nugget material. His lectures are extremely clear, and he encourages discussion without needing to use it as a crutch. I would recommend attending as many lectures as possible because not only is he very engaging, but his presentations provide you with a great foundation for the course (even if you skimp on the reading). More importantly, even if you have no art history knowledge, you will come out of Art Hum with a greater ability to assess/judge art (without a great deal of effort). You literally just need to sit back, relax and let Bear take care of business. It was the most painless class I've had at Columbia, and he is a very fair grader. It's also a great class to end your week on.

May 2010

Could not agree more with the previous reviewer!! Prof. Zarrillo is a very nice, engaging and fun lecturer who presents Masterpieces of Western Art with a very refreshing mixture of personal knowledge on the material, documentaries such as "The Power of Art" by CU's own Simon Schama (well worth checking out on YouTube) and even let the class make their own "Autumn Rhythm" style art piece near the end of the semester. This last bit was not only very enjoyable but helped me really get a sense of what the interaction with an artistic medium is really all about, something that you really can't understand from just reading about it. Overall, primarily given the light workload for this course, I can't recommend Prof. Zarrillo enough!

May 2010

Jessica was an awesome Art Hum instructor. She was fairly laid-back, and acknowledged that most of the students in the class weren't going to be studying art history in the future. She treated the course accordingly. Many students walked into the class with absolutely no interest in the subject, and Jessica managed to make it somewhat interesting for all of us. She has a sarcastic sense of humor that makes an otherwise somewhat (but necessarily) rudimentary curriculum enjoyable. She was also highly open to questions, and responded to e-mail promptly. She even threw us a mini-party at the end of the course for which she baked us cookies! Overall, I'd highly recommend her as an instructor if you're looking for a laid-back, informal, but informative learning atmosphere. Note: I recommend googling her and then teasing her about whatever's out there; this was a running joke throughout the course.

May 2010

The bottom line is don't take a class with Huffa. He is simply put a bad instructor, and I wish I had transferred out of his Art Hum class. Although I want to maintain hope that Huffa is academically rigorous in areas of his personal interest, he failed to convey this as a teacher. The questions he asked were often open-ended to a fault, and he often beat topics to death by continuing to ask the same question over and over again, "so what else can we say about this work?" Often, it seemed like he was fishing for a specific answer, but rather than offer it, he would repeat the question in the exact same terms, waiting out interminable pauses as the frustrated class fell silent, knowing that we weren't giving him what he wanted. Other times, in the free-for-all of class discussion, people would give answers that were clearly off the mark, but he would nonetheless spend a significant amount of time fleshing out speculative student comments rather than forwarding clarifying points of his own, even when it meant blatantly contradicting something he'd just said. It was so extreme, that one day a student completely mischaracterized the subject of a painting, and Huffa, who apparently hadn't done his homework expanded on the faulty interpretation, talking about how line, shape, lighting, etc. reinforced this idea. When another student pointed out that the figure in the painting was not in fact Judas, but Jesus, and not preparing for a kiss of betrayal, but warning the pharisees against worshipping money, Huffa hemmed and hawed, simply underscoring his lack of preparation for class or underlying knowledge of the works on the syllabus. As a result, general themes from the class were muddied, and I came away without clear footing on any basic concepts. I have a genuine interest in visual arts, and felt like this class invalidated the discipline of art history and theory for me. Other times he would make up answers on the fly, which sometimes the class let stand, but other times fell apart when questioned, which only made us feel uncomfortable and made him look incompetent. One time someone asked him if the distance between columns differed from ionic to doric temples and he pulled up a slide that supposedly reinforced his point that they were. It was apparent to the class that the distance was the same for all, but Huffa got flustered and defensive and wouldn't change his position even though it seemed like he'd realized he made a mistake. The class stopped arguing out of pity and he said to see him after class to talk further, but it put a bad taste in everyone's mouth. Sometimes I felt bad for him because he seemed so uncomfortable explaining himself, but other times it was maddening that he was supposedly responsible for helping us understand, discover, or explore the fundamentals of western art. His verbal tics and constant pacing were annoying, yes, but also seemed to betray some discomfort with standing in front of a class. Huffa was also consistently five to ten minutes late to class, and on at least two occasions, actually twenty minutes late to class. He would then fumble with the technology (the projector and syncing up computers) for another five to ten minutes, and apologize when his phone would ring in the middle of class because the silencer was evidently broken. He would ask over and over, "any questions?" desperate for one of us to ask him something to cover for the awkward silence while he fumbled with cables.

May 2010

Elizabeth is excellent. She is a wonderful woman and really made Art Hum a good experience for me. Granted lectures can get boring at times, and she knows it, but she tried with all her might to keep everyone interested and involved (it helps that she is a very beautiful woman). Towards the end of the semester she had our class play Art Hum Jeopardy. She is also very thorough. Her weekly assignment postings are full of useful links and information. She likes to make you draw sketches of everything, Grant's Tomb, St. John The Divine, etc...There are three essays, for each of which she gives a very clear idea of the assignment and what she is looking for. Her exams and grading are both very fair. The trips to the met were a lot of fun. She is very knowledgeable about all different aspects of art and is certainly the best Met tour guide I have ever had. She also brought us cupcakes on the last day of class! Above all she just really wants her students to appreciate art for what it is, and if you can learn to do that you will truly enjoy this class.

Apr 2010

Fantastic art hum prof. She is so relaxed and funny. I wanted to be her friend outside of class she was that cool.. Every week was fun with her. Don't miss out on this section. She's from the west and is down to earth and incredibly nice. I knew nothing about art walking into that class and I left wanting to be an art history major. She's young and passionate. Also, she use to work at the Met and gave us a great guided tour. Every class was funny and our class conversations were always insightful and valuable. This was good CU student bullshitting at its finest, and for once in my life I loved every minute of it. Stay in this section. Fight for this section. I loved it!

Feb 2010

I have to say that Masterpieces of Western Art was the first of the core classes I took, and there was no doubt in my mind that I was in a room full of students who would have rather been somewhere else. The first thing that Professor Isard did was try to move the mentality from requirement to discovery, and I must commend her for doing it very well. This course covers centuries of art and architecture, and she did a good job of connecting historic factors with artistic implications, and she challenged us by having us examine works of art with both analytic and emotional responses to help divulge deeper understanding or what these pieces of art meant within the context of the artists who created them, the society where the art was exposed and to us now. She is a fun lecturer, but she can be impatient if she detects that students are shlubbing. She's at her best when she has you at a museum in front of the actual work where she becomes romantic and authoritative.

Jan 2010

Jess Conrad was the best teacher I have had this year, and in a long time. Everything that she said was downright inspired; I'm an artist, and yet once I took her class I felt like I'd never really seen a piece of art before in my life. She completely gave me new eyes and I think most of the people in my class felt the same way. She's constantly interesting and enthusiastic about what we discussed, and the class is very comfortably casual--she talks about art, you can talk about art also; everyone chimes in and sometimes if nobody responds she calls on people. She is insistent that there is no wrong answer (and yet not wishy-washy at all; she's a real person with real ideas and opinions) and encourages people to participate and shoot out any thoughts--and indeed, some of the great ideas that came up in the course were from students. She is amazingly helpful and accessible: she will talk to you in person, by email, or by skype, or etc and literally will look over as many drafts of papers as you give her and give you help on every single one. You can do 20 drafts of a paper for her and she will give each draft attention and help you earn a great grade. She's funny and makes the class a good time. She was also wonderful on museum tours; afterward I felt like I never wanted to go to a museum without her. Sometimes she brings her small black dog to class.

Jan 2010

As an art student, I was sort of apprehensive about taking an art class, but Jessamyn's class is such that you can participate as much or as little as possible, and most people end up taking a lot away from the class. There's very little reading as the class is mostly based on discussion and as general as this sounds "what it means to look at art, or anything." The class was realyl interesting and I feel like I learned a great deal about being specific and articulate as far as what I see. If you put effort in, it's easy to do well.

Jan 2010

As it turns out, I totally love writing about visual art. Who knew? I certainly didn't, at least not before I took Ye Olde Art Hum with Andrea Renner. All of the expected Art Hum stuff happens: endless slides of Biblical imagery (what's the Annunciation again?), the recitation of fancy art terms like "modeling" and "priming," but all with a fun and enthusiastic instructor who can take her job (teaching you how to talk about art) seriously while not being afraid to make jokes about the "master" artists' tumultuous love lives. Most importantly, Renner holds your writing to an high standard while allowing you an ocean of leeway in developing your own unique arguments. My Art Hum essays were some of the best I wrote this semester, because I felt no pressure to either gauge or regurgitate the instructor's ideas; instead, I was able to use the skills picked up in lecture to describe *my* reaction to and interpretation of various works. Honestly, we spend so much time at Columbia absorbing and analyzing the ideas of others - it's nice to have a truly open opportunity to play around creatively with ideas of one's own during the writing process (and you might just develop a new appreciation for Michelangelo while you're at it).

Jan 2010

I have to say, I enjoyed his constant self referential anecdotes and occasional politicised comments. Generally entertaining, and at the very least a distraction from the utter inanity of this class. To be fair, I think most of the shortcomings of the class were more down to the concept and format of Art Hum than any real fault of his. As a lecturer he's perfectly adequate and straightforward - not particularly engaging or sparkling, but knows his stuff and gets the job done. Organization wise I would guess he has improved immensely - the lecture notes were generally up promptly, and the class was extremely well organized and integrated with Courseworks in general. Really well supported by the Art History department's Art Hum multimedia/further information site. We did however get fairly behind with the syllabus, and ended up spending almost no time on the very last section - a throwaway hour (at very most) on Frank Lloyd Wright. Not that you can miss classes though - any more than two will immediately drop you a whole grade. Class participation is graded too. He doesn't seem to expect much of students, and the most basic of descriptive responses (ie "what is in this picture? a woman with a child on her lap. great!) will probably get you pretty far. Otherwise, decent enough grader, though a stickler for proper grammar and, oddly enough, formally addressed emails. To sum up, Art Hum with McKelway is pretty much a formality - not excruciating, but not particularly enjoyable either. Not a semester ruining choice but if you're looking for that mythical illuminating Core experience, or even one that isn't utterly forgettable a few weeks later, look elsewhere.

Jan 2010

Ellen is amazing. If you get her you are really lucky. She is really understanding and cares about all her students. Even though her class was at 9am she made it enjoyable and tried her best to make it interesting. You really learn to appreciate art and the goals of the core are definitely fufilled. She is very approachable and you should definitely talk to her if you have any questions. She showed us how art is important in our everyday lives by trying to relate all the art we learn in class to facebook portraits for example. She really encourages participation and makes you feel confident to talk in class. She never puts anyone down. Overall, Ellen is great and definitely take her class!

Jan 2010

First off, Art Hum is Art Hum. A quiet, warm room with the lights off will make you fall asleep regardless of the professor. What matters is what happens when you are awake. Professor Bear does a pretty decent job of that. At first he seemed a little bit smug, but then it became clear it was a combination of frustration and amusement at the absurdity of teaching Bernini and the like in one day. Once he starts making jokes and laughing at yours, you begin to like the guy. And that's before you see the grading. Professor Bear takes the class nice and easy - his quiet and somewhat sardonic tone emphasizing it (though perhaps not helping on the dozing off front) - and drops heavy hints of what will be on the exam. Reading is usually a 10-20 page article each week that could read while taking care of something else. There are two 3-5 page papers which require a visit to a museum exhibit and on which he is a generous grader. The midterm and the final are the length of a typical class, and consist of IDs (for which he gave a Powerpoint of the possible works for us to study from), a couple of short compare-contrast essays on works, and a couple of short essays on passages from the reading. Both are easy as pie. Since the registrar doesn't reveal instructors after registration, this review won't be too helpful in selecting your mystery section. However, if you do find out that you got Professor Bear, don't worry, you didn't pull a short straw.

Jan 2010

Professor Bear is great!! He's very friendly, and doesn't punish students for not being art experts. He is very easy-going, and allows a lot of discussion. The only problem with that is that sometimes class would be dominated by obnoxious students. He assigns short readings every week, you can push these off until the midterm and final but there are text excerpts on the tests so you have to look over them at some point. There are two short papers, 3-5 pages each. On the first one he gives you a choice between 5 paintings and on the second you have to review an exhibition of your choice. Before the midterm and final, he posts a review slideshow for studying. This makes it very easy to get a perfect score on the slide id portion of the exam. He's a very fair grader, and is one of the few faculty members I have encountered that actually provide useful feedback on papers. I highly recommend taking a class with Prof. Bear.

Jan 2010

Art Humanities was solid with Jordan Bear. His lectures were very clear, precise, and he never went too far off topic. He also enunciates when speaking and doesn't talk to fast so it is easy to jot down everything. He uses terms that are graspable so that anyone could understand his lectures. But there wasn't anything too amazing about the lectures and I found myself sometimes having my head wandering (and with the lights dimmed, it sometimes is tempting to close your eyes for a bit). But even without my mind 100% present at the time, almost all of the information he presented seemed to stick, so I guess he extremely effective in the way he taught the course! Assignments were straightforward: two papers and a minimal amount of reading. He does do a passage ID where you have to note the author and the context on the final. My main concern over the course was that what we were tested on in the midterm and final had little to do about what he talked about in lecture rather it was on the readings and slide identification. I would recommend Jordan Bear's section of Art Hum. He made the material very approachable and accessible. Overall, a very solid course.

Dec 2009

Art Hum is a straightforward and enjoyable course to begin with, and Professor Hunnell made it engaging and manageable. I think it was her first time teaching the course, and occasionally it showed, but she is knowledgeable about the material and I expect her teaching will only improve in subsequent years. My only frustration was that she sometimes allowed class discussion of an artwork to meander, open-ended, for a little bit too long. If she had given the discussion more direction, and shared more of her knowledge, the class would have learned more. But this is a minor complaint, and overall she was a perfectly good teacher. The papers were very fairly graded and her comments were specific and helpful.

Dec 2009

Honestly, I couldn't have loved Art Hum more. She is super passionate about art, and wants her students to love it too. She even incorporates interesting and entertaining videos by her Advisor that are relevant to the subject matter. For the Jackson Pollock lecture, she surprised us by bringing in a canvas the exact same size as Pollock's "Autumn Rhythm" and brought the same color of paint, and many brushes for us to try to recreate his art. It was a great bonding experience for the class, and honestly, how many times are you going to be able to splatter paint on a canvas at Columbia.

Dec 2009

Katherine is AMAZING! Literally, no joke. She is young and hip and extremely nice. I've never been into Art but ArtHum was so interesting with her. She let us talk most of the time and just tell her what we saw and sure, she would steer the conversation and put in her two cents but she really made it interactive and fun. She clarified any topics that were difficult and made sure to answer all questions so that we were comfortable with the material. There is rarely any homework, maybe 3 readings to clarify material throughout the semester. The midterm is 3 ID and compare essays which are pretty easy. Two 5-pg papers just analyzing a piece and then a take home final, which is just another paper analyzing a theme from the whole semester. The essays seem daunting at first (can I really talk about art for five pages?!) but you learn a lot in the process. Anyway, she really is just a fabulous professor and I learned a lot. I'd recommend her many times over, possibly the best class I've had here at Columbia.

Dec 2009

Jeffrey was a great professor for Art Hum. He was simultaneously challenging but quite fair, and he made sure that the class kept a good pace, which was both comfortable and well thought through. He is a good lecturer, uses discussion fairly, and his powerpoints that feature all of the the artwork that you'll need to know for the course are put together in a fashion that makes them interesting as well as continuously force you to tie key themes of the course together. Jeffrey is quite personable too and very accessible during office hours, and he seems to cut down on the busy work that can seem to plague other sections of Art Hum. This professor is crazy smart and lacks the pretension that a professor of his caliber has the tendency to pick up over time. Hopefully, Jeffrey sticks around to teach a few more sessions of Art Hum, as he comes highly recommended. Also, be sure to check out some of his books and articles, as he is a big deal when it comes to media theory and the Bauhaus. The trip to the MET was quite an enjoyable experience, as Jeffrey was both engaging and willing to let students discuss what they saw and thought.

Dec 2009

I think Professor/Dr. Minturn is everything that you can hope for in a humanities professor. He is incredibly knowledgeable about each era that is covered, and is able to namedrop with the best of them (in a good way! He can quote many many art critics about any piece/artist etc...). I didn't have a particular interest in art entering the class, but I left appreciating it more than I could imagine. He's a pretty young guy, is extremely friendly/approachable, and is a very good lecturer. Class structure: Minturn lectures for basically the entire class (which was always cut short 5/10 minutes), allowing for small pockets of discussion that weren't usually used very extensively. I don't know if it was my class in particular, but no one save 2 or 3 people really participated regularly. This isn't good news for those who love to hear themselves speak... BUT, when Dr. Minturn speaks (and again, it's for 95% of the class), it's always interesting. It's not a class where you necessarily WANT to speak out and disrupt the flow, because I really think he is that good at describing the topics/pieces/era/artist/etc. at hand, and it's far more helpful to just let the man do his thing. Like I'm sure most Art Hum classes are, he comes in w/ a flash drive prepared with a powerpoint filled with the art that we're going to discuss for the day. Slide by slide he narrates. Easy as that. If you end up with this guy, you are very very lucky. I don't think Art Hum. could be that difficult no matter who teaches it, but Minturn definitely makes it the most interesting and painless (and actually enjoyable).

Dec 2009

Emerson has the two most important characteristics of a charismatic lecture; expertise and enthusiasm. Although students have a mix of backgrounds when taking core classes, many of whom have little practical use for this subject matter, I can confidently say that Emerson instilled in every student a genuine interest for art. In class, he'll be constantly moving around and pointing at slides in such a way that leads you dynamically through the analysis of the works. The best part of the class were the lectures given at the Met which became successively better. This is when his already high energy came out most. He's a young guy with a friendly and humble disposition which makes him very approachable. When I hinted that I had been struggling with a paper, he didn't hesitate to offer me an extra day.

Dec 2009

Saletnik was a bit serious at the beginning of the semester, but as time wore on he loosened up. I've decided that he's a chill person, a fair grader, and passionate about art history. He knows the subject thoroughly and he knows how to communicate it, a rare combination. His powerpoint presentations are thoughtfully put together and make clear the point he is trying to make each class. He is not the most engaging lecturer in the world, but he demands just enough class participation to keep people interested. Bottom line: You could definitely do A LOT worse than Prof. Saletnik. Stick with him and you might even learn something.

Nov 2009

Olivia was one of the most encouraging and competent teachers I've ever had. While there was the usual 2-3 students monopolizing the in-class conversation, Olivia tried to include everyone and encourage each person by pointing out many different ways of looking at the art and taking the time to listen to student suggestions; for example, she changed around her syllabus to make time for artists we found interesting, and scheduled optional trips to the MET with two meeting times to accommodate students. I was nervous to take this course with very little prior knowledge of art, but she paid attention to the needs of her students. Most notable, I think Olivia just wants her students to succeed, to understand and enjoy the material and not stress too much about grades, and if you utilize office hours for papers she'll really help you formulate ideas and edit before they're due. If you're disillusioned with the Core as much as I was, take Art Hum with Olivia, she may convince you too that it can be worthwhile.

Oct 2009

She is the reason the core exists. I came into Art Hum not knowing much of anything about art. She was incredibly intimidating at first, but she is actually a really sweet and approachable person. That said, this isn't the class for someone who wants to completely bullshit their way through Art Hum. You will learn a lot and actually appreciate art if you put a bit of work into it.

Oct 2009

The Best EVERRR! very encouraging, thoughtful teacher, especially for people who have no prior experience with art analysis. as an engineer, i have gained so much more interest and appreciation for art and art history in general. i find myself wanting to go to the MET during any free time i have in order to learn more about art from various periods in history and parts of the world. i didn't do very well on my first paper but then i met with olivia and she worked with me until my second paper was worthy of an A. i really appreciated how much she cared to help me improve my analysis skills. fantastic! take her at any cost

Sep 2009

I felt immensely fortunate to have Christina Hunter for Art Hum. Her lectures were elucidating and detailed, and she didn't waste time digressing on tangents and useless questions like "what IS art" (something I find annoying about Core classes). She was very clear about what she wanted us to know, and while she does focus on essay writing, I felt I learned quite a lot about how to analyze and write about art from taking her class--she was very open to giving feedback on drafts and encouraged office hour attendance. Christina's rich background in art and her subtle sense of humor made my 9am class completely worthwhile.

Aug 2009

Kate has a cheery personality and is a good lecturer. I enjoyed her class and had a good rapport with her, but I was shocked when I received my final grade, which was the lowest I've ever seen at CU. The issue is that she's a PHD candidate, not an actual professor, and doesn't understand how the Columbia grading system and the "columbia fail" works. You will easily see a B-range grade without some serious effort and attendance, and lower efforts could possibly result in worse!

Aug 2009

Kate is a stubborn, childlike teacher who will give you a good grade if you tell her what she wants to hear. she leaves no room for creative interpretations or alternative ideas, so you have to give the answers that she wants to hear and basically regurgitate information to get a good grade. for that reason, her class is pretty easy, but you won't learn anything. all in all, she is probably one of the worst professors i've had at columbia, and also one of the easiest. she allows no critical thought in her class, just straight up memorization and vomiting of information without any excess knowledge or analysis at all. she's pretty easy if you can sit through her trying to act out every contorted greek sculpture's pose in front of the class instead of providing any real stimulating background information or context for any of the works. if you don't care about art, don't mind butchering all art history, and are willing to just regurgitate information without critically engaging with it in any way, then this is the class for you.

Jul 2009

absolutely amazing professor - while her class is intense, you learn SO MUCH in each of her classes that its more than worth it. she definitely is intimidating and appears unapproachable, but in reality, she is always available after class for any questions, etc. if you are lucky enough to get her, don't switch - you'll regret it. she is truly one of the most enlightening professors i have had.

Jul 2009

As opposed to the first previous review that was more of a demonizing rant than a genuine analysis of this instructor, I will attempt to fairly address the pros and cons of Risham Majeed. While many aspects of that review are undeniably true, there are some things that were omitted. I’ve thought long and hard about what I wanted to write in this review so I hope it is effective. Firstly, this instructor is dead serious and will rarely crack a smile. From day one her arrogance is abhorrently cast upon the class as she continually forgets names and/or calls students by other students’ names. (Once she even called a student “Monet”, ha). If you wish to receive a good grade in this class it is vital to ensure that she learns your name quickly. She stresses the importance of participation so be sure to frequently have your hand in the air. She conducts each lesson in seminar style and does succeed in producing interesting discussions between herself and students. While she most certainly likes to hear herself talk, there are ample opportunities to speak up and she is fairly receptive. Even when ideas span as far as someone comparing Jesus in a painting to a Stephen King character, or explaining that Saturn isn’t eating his baby child “effectively”, she rarely will berate such thoughts. However, her lectures are excellent and interesting and she is undoubtedly committed to the material. She is irrefutably very intelligent and knowledgeable when it comes to the course material. If you pay attention many of the units can be engrossing (excluding Amiens Cathedral in particular). One thing Risham didn’t seem to notice is that we are FORCED to take Art Hum and therefore, most of us aren’t genuinely interested in the material. Therefore, its absurd for her to act disappointed when few people show up to her tentatively planned, unscheduled field trips to often majorly inconvenient locations (i.e. the Cloisters and Sotheby’s). The overall classroom atmosphere ranges from those truly unmotivated (some seniors and a few others) to those too petrified of Risham to say a word. Regardless, after a few weeks to a month, a fair amount of the class dismissed their qualms about speaking up in class. Participation is worth a whopping 30% of your final grade so be sure to show up, sign the sign-in sheet, and speak up in class as much as you can. One of Risham’s worst traits is that if you e-mail ANYTHING to her, the likelihood of response is slim. I feel as though she only responds to e-mails that are quick and convenient for her to answer. I can confidently say that she responded to an estimated 33% of my e-mails. Be it a question about the midterm/final/papers/ or trying to schedule a time to come to her office hours, a response is rare. On the note of office hours, she only decided to hold official office hours starting AFTER the midterm exam and she often cancelled them without as much as a simple “unfortunately, I can’t make it” or an old fashioned “sorry.” Furthermore, there is ZERO, I repeat ZERO, direction as to how to succeed on the exams or papers in this class. She held one review session for the midterm that was, at best, mildly helpful and she answered one student’s question “Will we have a review for the final exam?” with a typically phlegmatic “No.” There is a midterm exam and final exam worth 15% and 20% of your grade, respectively. The midterm comprised of 10 slide ID’s (artist, date within 10 years, and title), and three comparative essays. She zips through the slides, often not allowing enough time to think about them and not always telling you when she is switching to the next slide. You are given 15 minutes per essay so scribble everything you know into some coherent manner and be sure to include the proper name, artist and date of the works you are analyzing. The hardest part is citing authors from secondary sources throughout the semester; however, she didn’t seem to grade too harshly if you don’t go into detail on them. The final is a similar format except that there are 15 slide ID’s, 2 comparative essays (15 minutes/essay) and one longer essay which you have 45 minutes to write. Another thing to keep in mind when studying is that she likes to pick obscure slides so study pieces that you may not otherwise expect to end up on the exam. Nevertheless, the essays count for an overwhelming percentage of the exam so in actuality, forgetting a few slides wont be too detrimental to your grade. As for papers, there is a one-page, ungraded writing assignment towards the beginning of the semester that she was pointlessly harsh on, a 4-5 page paper (15% of your grade), and an 8-10 page paper (20%). For the latter two she gives no more than vague, two-sentence note that gives you no substantial idea of what you should be writing about. And before I forget, I need to mention that she actually gave us a pop-quiz one day (I thought this was college, not high school…or middle school for that matter). I assume that when she graded them she realized that there was little point in such assessments. Posting to courseworks and short-medium length readings comprise the rest of the workload for this class. While she doesn’t grade individual postings, I assure you that she takes note of exactly who does and doesn’t post. Risham is not one to shy away from admonishing the class for things such as not posting to courseworks, sleeping in class, or using a cell phone in class. Not to say that it isn’t wholly unreasonable for her to care about such things, but e-mails such as my personal favorite that says “If anyone is caught sleeping, texting or using any other electronic device in class again you will be asked to leave and marked absent for that class. It is not only disrespectful and distracting to me but to your classmates as well.” seem ironic when she will ignore your e-mails but still manage to send hostile ones. And frankly, I don’t know what other “electronic devices” she is referring to here, but I am curious to know… Now here is where some of you might get confused as to my agenda in writing such a verbose review. I have to say that despite the aforementioned downsides, I am overall glad that I took this class with this teacher. While her harsh, atypical idiosyncrasies were hardly necessary, I found myself focused and committed to the class and emerged from it not only more interested in art, but with a working knowledge and understanding of how to analyze artwork. Sure, her irascibility frustrated me at times, if you put in the work and show up to class, you can pull of a good grade and actually learn something. However, if you futz around in class, or just don’t show up, you’ll simply sink beneath the stress and likely end up dropping the class.

May 2009

IN RESPONSE TO THE REVIEW OF THE 18TH OF MAY, 2009 Now hang on a sec. True, she was not the best teacher, but Risham Majeed wasn't nearly as bad as the previous reviewer made it out to be. Lest there be any doubt, Risham knows her material very, very well. This is obvious, both in her lectures and her feedback to her students' input. I don't think there was ever any malicious intent on her part. I attended office hours often, and she was always very kind and patient with my questions and with her answers. This may have been a clever PR move, but I doubt it. Rather than being a show-off, I feel that Risham did her best to inhibit intelligent discussion. She always always ALWAYS listened to each student's input, no matter how badly or clumsily it was fashioned. And she always made an effort to say something constructive about the student's input. This shows that 1) she actually listens to what we say, and 2) she really wanted us to learn something, whether our input was good or bad. True, we did skip a few artists on the syllabus, but that's probably because Risham was trying to fit everybody in while doing each his own justice - something impossible in a survey course like Art Hum. I mean, you could spend an entire semester on Raphael alone. To spend a mere 3 hours on him must make an art nut like Risham cringe. So you can really blame her for running out of time; she was merely trying to cram as much about each artist into the course as possible, and in the end it proved to be too much. She did whisk through the slides rather quickly and randomly, but she made all the slideshows (with images fully labeled) available on Courseworks. Thus, studying for the final was not a problem. Yes, there are a lot of them to remember, but that THAT many. I personally found her fairly random and laissez-faire style to be a breath of fresh air from the stringent bureaucratic structure which dominates the Columbia academic landscape. She's also an easy grader. I barely studied for the final (started about 5 hours before the exam) and did pretty darn well. There are, of course, flaws. Her class could get extremely...ahem...boring, so clearly she had difficulty transferring her enthusiasm for the subject matter to her students. Sometimes she would say something and I found myself saying "but Risham, I don't CARE." The class was pretty painful, because the entire time I was asking myself, "Why am I here? I don't need to know this $h1t!" The truth is, I was only there so that I could fulfill the Core requirement. Thus, Risham's insistence on emphasizing student input made this class a generally miserable experience. Also, I suspect she is guilty of playing favorites. And I was not paying attention 100% of the time, but she seemed to pick on those who texted or fell asleep in class. So be careful. All in all, despite her flaws I think Risham was genuinely invested in the Art Hum pedagogical project. Too bad I hated the subject material.

May 2009

READ THIS. Its long but you deserve to know. Don't take an class from this instructor (term used extremely loosely) unless you want to be condescended to, criticized in class and even more so in your papers (you choose which is worse), treated like a child, reminded that you know nothing at art (even though you may), and ignored. Don't take a class from this instructor unless you don't mind having the syllabus change more than three times in a semester, being told repeatedly that readings would be available on courseworks only to find out at the last minute that YOU get to track them down and copy them from the one book in the entire library system that has the article, and then get back to your computer to read and post the response. Oh!!! Don't take this class if you actually want to learn about all of the artists listed on the Art Humanities Departmental Syllabus - if you are willing to skip three, hey cool, then take this class. Wait! Don't take this class if you totally don't mind asking genuinely curious questions (either in class or email) and being either completely passed over to hear imaginary-martini-holding windbags talk about the connections of Kant and whatever piece is on the overhead slide, or entirely ignored until after your question is no longer relevant (say, AFTER the paper is due even though you submitted your question five days in advance). This "instructor" is far more interested in showing you what she knows (what exactly that is remains to be seen) than teaching you anything. I used to like museums. I can't stand the thought of a museum now, thanks to her. Do not take this class unless you like totally last minute Response assignments (no particular pattern in these assignments, just whenever she feels like it and remembers to send the email). She is the epitome of stereotypical "art people" that every TV and movie you have seen has profiled. Eew. IF YOU GET STUCK WITH HER in your last semester before graduation: do everything your power to get out of this class. Graduate later. Or go to the department head. Or your dean. Your instinct is correct. She is bad, bad, bad. IF YOU GET STUCK WITH HER, read everything on the syllabus, and memorize it. You will need to know it for finals...because she may hold one review session for the mid-term (which turns out to be completely irrelevant and unhelpful) and NO review session for the Final. See below in "Workload". Also -- TIP -- watch all of Simon Schama's "Power of Art" relevant videos (available on YouTube). They're excellent, and you'll learn a lot. Also read Wikipedia. Seriously. Write down the name of every slide she uses - a challenge considering most of them she does not list on her slides. I wish you the best of luck. MAKE SURE YOU SIGN THE SIGN IN SHEET!!!!!! EVERY CLASS!

May 2009

Sonia was not a bad or mean teacher and actually made class easier by cutting out a lot of the readings and responses and even the midterm. However at the beginning of the semester she told us not to take any notes, which did not work out well at the end of the semester when the final was far more detailed than she had prepared us for. And since the midterm was cut there was hardly anything to fall back on. Suddenly we had to memorize a huge list of names and dates that we'd been told all along were inconsequential. So don't listen to that advice. Take a few notes.

May 2009

If you get the chance to take Andrew's section, go ahead and do it. He's extremely nice, down to earth, and probably the most humble instructor I have ever had at Columbia. He values students input, and really gives people a chance to discuss. I could always tell that even if he had something to say, if a hand was raised, he would immediately call on that person to speak. Truly an outstanding man. In terms of teaching, he is very knowledgeable of all of the readings, painters, architects, and even some of the background stories behind sculptures or other works. I enjoyed how he added several comparisons to the core artists, something that a lot of other sections don't really do. The class itself is pretty straight forward. You need to memorize a lot of images, but its usually not that bad. Andrew grades pretty leniently, and always gives encouraging remarks on the papers. I learned a lot in this class, and it wasn't really that difficult. That pretty much sums up an amazing class.

May 2009

If you're just trying to get the Core requirements out of the way, count yourself lucky if you get Professor Jones for Art Hum. It was easily the easiest class I've ever taken, with almost no work at all outside of the time commitment of going to class and going to the museum trips, although the weekly response papers are pretty tedious. It's safe to say that you're never really required to remember anything for this class. You'll learn a bit about art and how to analyze art, but I suspect that there are other Art Hum classes where a lot more effort is required but where you would get a lot more out of it.

May 2009

I was pretty hesitant about taking this class but am so glad I had Prof. Catterson. There is a lot of material and artists to cover but each class was interesting and insightful. She's an excellent teacher and very knowledgeable about the field and works covered. The research paper can be difficult if you've never used Avery before but Lynn can help guide you in the right direction and is really helpful during office hours.

May 2009

Although I can see where the person who said that Prof. was so intimidating that they didn't enjoy the class was coming from, I disagree. She was intimidating. She was also sort of a hard ass. Miss 3 classes and your grade will be lowered a grade and missed museum trips count, even if you make them up, and you will also have to do extra work that no one else had to do. But this was actually my favorite class of all at Columbia. I thought her lectures were fascinating. I am sooo glad that I had her as a professor. She is the sole reason that I know love art.

May 2009

I wanted to recommend Professor Catterson as a wonderful Professor, particularly for the Art Humanities class that I took with her this year. As an engineering student, I went into the class with pessimism for the field, and especially for the fact that the discipline encourages frivolous spending while so many of the world's poor have to struggle for basic necessities. With that attitude, it would have been easy to find absolutely nothing valuable in art with any other teacher. But Professor Catterson definitely opened my mind to the discipline by not only having an analytical approach towards art that encouraged students in class to look and discuss beyond what is just visible, making the process of viewing art challenging and fun, but also had a balanced viewpoint in which she brought in different perspectives without enforcing any one opinion. The latter is a very unique characteristic in the faculty at the undergraduate level, and one that I truly cherish. By placing each painting in the context of its unique political, religious, and cultural environment, she helped us understand both medieval Gothic art and pop art by Warhol, truly a goal that can take years to fulfill, that she has done in merely 1 semester for most of us. I cannot believe that I could have had a better teacher who became my only guide in my whole life to art (I am an engineer, so I will not be needing any art classes in future), and her influence on me will certainly last my lifetime; I am only glad that this influence was so positive, and that it interested me to pursue different forms of art (particularly modern buildings' architecture and Baroque art and sculpture) in leisure, and appreciate the field of art while respecting artists.

May 2009

Lynn is absolutely incredible. She is extremely knowledgeable as well as passionate about art history, making art hum an amazing experience. She does not focus solely on dates and names but rather ties themes across artists, locations and time periods to allow it all to come together naturally. Lynn is beyond helpful during office hours and goes out of her way to help with paper topics, sources, etc. I would definitely say she is by far one of my favorite professors at Columbia yet. The dinner at her apartment in the Bronx is fantastic.

May 2009

Although the workload for Melanie's class could be considered typical for a normal Art Hum class (though with an inordinately large amount of memorization that has to be done for the midterm and final), I found the lectures entirely unenjoyable as Melanie was extremely intimidating and just way too intense in teaching a class for students that are all most likely not art history majors. Sure, you'll read some reviews that say that it was in her intimidation and intensity that the class was enjoyable since it provided an academic challenge, but if you're looking for an easy-going art hum class just to get it out of your core requirements, this is not the class to take. She demands a certain level of class participation, making it clear at the beginning of the class that she is very mindful of how much you're participating, but at the same time, she will call you out on comments that she thinks are "wrong" without any hesitation. There were 3 mandatory museum visits, none of which I found enjoyable. This is coming from someone that has enjoyed visiting museums before, but the way that she contextualized our visits to the museums, the way that she framed them according to how we were supposed to write our essays, made the trips way too intense, as if we were supposed to fill in the shoes of experienced art historians. The first was an unnecessarily long 5 hr visit of the MET, in which we were required to stay at the museum for the full 5 hrs.

Apr 2009

Not helpful, a poor grader, bad at giving feedback, makes me fall asleep in class, makes me hate art, makes me want to go to every single museum in the world and destroy every single painting. she loves the sound of her own voice and doesn't shut up when you have something to say. You basically gotta go a war of the words with this woman. not even a professor and such a god-awful teacher. good news is I used her class to study for a midterm I had ten minutes afterwards and I aced that midterm, so art hum is conducive for studying other subjects that actually will help you get a job in life. Also makes me wonder why people waste their life studying art only to become unemployed in later life. This class made me love engineering. But that's just me. If you're an engineer, beware; if not, enjoy learning about the relationship between you and the artist or some bs like that. And she says that anyone can be an artist, so a little child drawing on a piece of paper is comparable to Picasso according to her.

Apr 2009

Unless you want to be spoonfed art history that is boiled down to its bare essentials, do not take Art Hum with Professor Finegold! While he is a nice and approachable teacher, I find that he pitches the class level at a level far too low for anyone with any art history experience. While this makes for a comfortable and interesting class for people with no background, each two hour class quickly becomes pretty drab for anyone else.

Mar 2009

I think most people from Mylonopoulos’ class would disagree with the previous review. Mylonopoulos actually did a lot. He taught us how to describe what we saw and compare it to other things in order to come to an understanding of the art through our observations (and some historical context, which the readings gave us). He carefully guided our conversations and had us do a lot of looking and talking, but I think it was clear that his intention was to empower the students, not embarrass anyone. Professor Mylonopoulos encouraged each and every student and was extremely patient while we all learned how to look at art. He is generous and attentive, happy to answer questions outside of class time, and definitely wants all of his students to succeed. For those students who are not motivated: go to a different school. Everyone else: Professor Mylonopoulos is great. Take his class.

Jan 2009

Your typical art hum professor, who favored the kids in the class who had taken an art history course before. Not a great professor (just got his PhD) but still a bright guy overall. He will make the course interesting and make you memorize a ton of slides for ID's for the midterm and final. all in all, decent professor but you dont really have a choice in art hum, but he is not as easy as some of the other art hum professors

Jan 2009

Mark Watson is one of those graduate students who wants to avoid miserable and dry classes. This makes him very motivated to make the class interested, and he succeeds at it. Being an Art History graduate student, he really loves dealing with the big ideas behind the world of art. He is aware of the limitations of Art Hum, and works around them by encouraging dynamic and engaging classes. He had trouble holding back his opinions on Anarchism, modernism and the "art academies" which was wonderful, since we all enjoyed thinking about it all from our own perspective, deprived of an undergraduate major in Art History (if im not mistaken.) Overall, a good guy and a potentially fulfilling class.

Jan 2009

Really cool, laidback PhD student in the department. I learned a lot and was actually challenged. He's young and really receptive to student comments in the discussion, even if they are dumb. But he tries to elevate the discussion and if you bite back, class can actually be really, really interesting. He's receptive to e-mails, and I really enjoyed him as my professor. We went on a class brunch at Campo at the end of the semester, too, which was nice (and free!) You will definitely leave this class with knowledge you can take away except perhaps if you're already a serious art history student.

Jan 2009

A great professor! Understands the realm of art thoroughly and makes his classes very enjoyable. Although it is hard to choose professors when taking art humanity, stick with him if you do. Class participation recommended.

Jan 2009

Ricky is just plain smart. This class is easy and he makes it interesting (his blue eyes do most of the work. ) Sigh!

Jan 2009

Kaira is a smart woman. She's young and energetic and WANTS you to learn! She's passionate about art and that is obvious by how she teaches. Her method is all-inclusive. She wants the class to participate and ask questions so she passes a pointer around thus involving all her students in the discussions. She keeps the class light and interesting by talking about her experiences working with up and coming artists and her travels. She is an art buff and it's apparent she thrives in an environment where her students actively engage in the subject and demonstrate an actual INTEREST in it. Even if you're not an art history major, Kaira invests a lot of herself in helping you develop an appreciation for art. That said, be forewarned: when discussing art with an ARTIST, you better know your stuff! She has a critical eye for detail and expects the same of her students. She's big on adjectives and the more you use them the happier she gets. When describing a work of art, describe it like you're talking to a blind person (sounds easier than it actually is.) She wants to know art has somehow MOVED you. So it's important for you to recall names, dates, and mediums for the works you will study. Dates are VERY important to her and you WILL be penalized if you don't get them correct so memorize, memorize, memorize! Also, pay attention to the assigned readings (all on Courseworks.) The readings tie into her lectures and are the focus of the class discussions. She's very approachable and accommodating so don't be afraid to speak up if you need to. She's there for you and WILL reach out to you if she senses a problem. Overall, the class was terrific and I totally loved it. It would have been much better had it not been for a couple of talking bobble-heads in class who did not know when to keep their mouths shut! Other than that, it was great!

Jan 2009

Definitely the professor to take for Art Hum (perk: Director of Art Hum). When I had taken Holger (Fall 2007) he had just come back from some random but awesome "sabbatical"...I believe he was at an excavation site somewhere in Europe and was also a curator at a couple of museums. Back to the course, I left that class with a greater appreciation for art, and also considered taking another class (preferably with Holger) but was unable to fit it into my schedule. He is a very kind, down to earth, and passionate about sharing his art knowledge and appreciation with his students.

Jan 2009

Ms. Seasonwein is great - she is a fair grader and is readily available for extra help. Her lectures are well-structured and she effectively encourages class discussion as well - I recommend her class!

Jan 2009

Christina is one of the few actual professors who does this class, and she really knows her stuff. I was surprised by how much I got out of the class, and how much I actually enjoyed it. She was often silly and funny, be really engaged the class in an intelligent discussion. She was always encouraging students to give her drafts, come by office hours, and talk with her, which I should have done before one of my papers since I took it in the completely wrong direction (though she still gave me a lenient grade for what I did do and I was able to make it up on the final). Since you have to take Art Hum, I would recommend her if you want to actually get something out of the class.

Jan 2009

A cursory Google search reveals that Teresa has been a grad student for twice as long as it takes most of us to earn our college degree. I've seen this purgatory wear on people harder than it has on Teresa, but she definitely has an idea of what she wants you to learn and why she wants you to learn it. Little imagination has gone into the syllabus, and little imagination is required of each student, but you do learn the Art Hum curriculum fairly thoroughly while many of your peers are goofing off at the MoMA or listening to drivel of the noise movement in Music Hum. Whether or not you want this is really up to you, but it - the 9 AM start time, the compulsory participation, the papers where you have to find a single right answer to the prompt that corresponds to whatever's in Teresa's head, the weekly posts that wear upon the soul, and the tests that require hours of tedious studying to achieve an arbitrary grade - is certainly far from all that's out there, which is not the idea that I got from the other CULPA reviews when I signed up for this section. Take Teresa if you want a very traditional approach to old traditional art with old traditional pedagogy, but I feel that there must be more rewarding ways of getting through Art Hum or getting an A in a subject that intensely disinterests you, depending on how you feel about the requirement.

Jan 2009

By way of teaching, Professor Mylonopoulos does little. After a brief introduction to the syllabus, this class of unenthusiastic students was asked a question that we would hear several times every class: "Now who would like to describe this?" Most students, myself included, knew nothing about art and, having been given no parameters, fumbled awkwardly and embarrassingly through their descriptions throughout the entire semester. Professor M gave little to no historical context or information regarding the artists or artwork, relying on the students to talk for the entirety of the class--I learned more from Wikipedia. He is pleasant enough, but his extremely minimalistic teaching style is suited to only the most motivated and interested students, something found rarely in a core class such as this.

Jan 2009

Lynn is, as many have said, awesome (and she knows it, but that shouldn't bother you). She is by far the nicest, most accessible, personable, and understanding professor I have had at this school and a delightful break form the norm in that respect. Although she didn't follow the art hum syllabus to a T, I learned so much that by the end of the class I didn't really care that we didn't make it to Warhol. This was because Lynn teaches you the fundamentals of the abstract discipline of Art History, not 'names, dates, and facts'. You will leave the class able to teach yourself whatever you want to know. Don't skip her class dinner at her awesome Bronx rooftop apartment. It was one of the highlights of my semester and I made a few new friends as a result. Also don't skip the Met visits - they are totally worth it. Lynn is also super nice with the grades and very flexible with assignments.

Jan 2009

Really, really great. I had Risha her first semester as well. She does convey the material really well, and the workload is great - three papers (first one wasn't graded) and a midterm and a final that was not cumulative. You don't have field trips/mandatory museum visits outside of classtime the way other art hum sections do (such a good thing). You do have to visit one of a few churches for your paper and the Met for your papers, but those are not bad at all. She's really a catch for art hum.

Dec 2008

Dr. Wamsler is a very sweet woman who takes quite a while to warm up to, and who takes even longer to warm up to the class. On the first day, she literally said "um" every other word. She was very nervous and very cold. The beginnings of the class were not great. It took us until October to figure out what in the world she was actually looking for from us--"analysis of visual language". Yeah, because that's not even slightly ambiguous. By the end though, we all really loved her. She had us over to her AMAZING penthouse apartment on the Upper-West Side for dinner at the end of the semester. Incredible sweet, in the end. Go to the Met visit. It's the best part of the course.

Dec 2008

Sarah is a great Art Hum professor! I would definitely recommend taking her class. She makes art humanities interactive; which is key for an art history class. She is very knowledgable and can answer almost any question raised.

Dec 2008

It's almost kind of a shame that she's so nice, because if she was more of a bitch I would feel free to hate her. The workload is very light, and, in my opinion, the subject matter is pretty interesting. That being said, the class was enormously frustrating, and, if I had to do it over again, I would have tried to get another teacher. This was because of a few major issues with the class: The first is that the discussions were appallingly, mind-bogglingly shallow. Perhaps this was a consequence of having a class almost entirely composed of freshmen, but I don't pay exorbitant amounts of money to go to Columbia so we can talk about completely obvious bullshit like how the David is a sculpture made of marble, or how Rembrandt sometimes painted with large brushstrokes and sometimes didn't. Hell, I'd never taken an art history class in my life, and I think I probably could have figured 75% of what we talked about just by going to a museum. This probably could have been avoided if Ms. Wamsler had encouraged deep, meaningful discussions, but instead, she actively encouraged the loud people who spewed obvious bullshit to keep talking. These douches had taken like, one art history class in high school and because of this, had convinced themselves that they were complete experts in art and that everyone should coo and ooh and ahh over their shiny, "new" revelations. This meant that the quieter people who might actually have had insightful things to say shut up and let the discussions derail into ego-stroking symposia of stupidity. One bright point about the lectures was that Ms. Wamsler occasionally made unintentionally hilarious language fuck-ups that I actually found really endearing. The second thing that really bothered me was a seeming inconsistency behind her grading patterns. Her justifications behind assigning particular grades to my papers and tests seemed flimsy or nonexistent. Feedback on my papers amounted to checkmarks at certain points in the margins and a circled grade at the bottom. The difference between an A and a C paper was never really outlined. If the in-class discussions were so shallow, how was I supposed to figure out what to write in these essays, which had absurdly higher standards? She also definitely played favorites. The more you blatantly sucked up to her, the better off you were in the class. My advice to you if you do have her as a professor: talk A LOT in class. Doesn't matter what you talk about, if it's relevant, or if it's insightful, just talk. This is interpreted as genuine interest in the subject matter and in her, which she rewards with better treatment and better grades. Perhaps I am being too harsh. After all, she's very nice, and what should I have expected from a class with so little homework and so many freshmen? Anyway, I would have rather had a different professor, but if you don't want very much work, don't mind being mystified by your grades, don't mind not learning much about art, and want a delicious end-of-semester lasagna dinner, then she might work for you.

Dec 2008

Noam, is a phd student in art history at princeton which naturally makes him a douchey pretentious art historian. He taught art humanities, but taught it assuming that we had all taken an art history class before. He was a decent teacher, but really took no extra effort to help out a class which was clearly struggling with the analysis. Elcott is obsessed with formal analysis which we wrote all of our papers about. Overall, not a great professor, but if you have no choice he is a decent choice.

Dec 2008

What an amazing class. Denise completely changed the way I saw, thought about, and talked about art. She's smart, funny, great at giving everyone a chance to speak. Fair grader. Some complain that she's so easygoing in class and then serves up really hard tests. I didn't find that to be true. She made class enjoyable and fun but warned you upfront that you would have to study. And plus she's very sympathetic to her students and gives out candy almost all the time. I dug her.

Dec 2008

Craig makes art hum a truly enjoyable experience. He knows the material and goes through what you need to know for the midterm and final, but the class is laid back most of the time. He focuses more on the modern stuff relative to other art hum teachers but still covers much of the overall syllabus. As an econ major, I wasn't looking forward to taking art hum. By the middle of the semester, however, I looked forward to going to class. He is a perfect fit for this class and is highly recommended.

Dec 2008

Really very straight forward and nice guy. I have absolutely no background in art but he will tell you all you need to know for the papers and midterms. Just take decent notes and the rest is memorization and regurgitation.

Dec 2008

Professor Klein deserves a CULPA gold nugget, he is amazing! I had never taken any art history before this course and I am now registered for two art history classes next semester and considering Art History as my second major. Professor Klein presents material very clearly and his discussions are always interesting. He encourages students to participate at all times, answers any and all questions patiently and only calls on those people he thinks have something to say, not on those who are not talking. Everyone in my class spoke several times, even people who usually do not talk in class at all. Professor Klein took us to the Met and invited us for tapas and chocolate covered strawberries at the Met terrace wine bar afterwards. I loved every class and was sad that it was over so fast. My only criticism is that although he is the art hum director, we didn't get through large parts of the syllabus.

Dec 2008

By far she has been the most amazing professor at Columbia. Her style of teaching is well suited for the material that is presented and her canny ability to engage with the students helped me get through many hours in that dark room. She is always readily available and returns emails fairly promptly. I have learned so much from her class this semester that I am seriously considering taking up a concentration in art history. She is THAT good. The workload is very manageable and the trips to the Met are enjoyable because she makes it interesting and worthwhile. I would recommend ArtHum with her to anyone that is willing to listen.

Jul 2008

First, the pros: Susanna, as other reviewers have pointed out, is pretty relaxed about deadlines. This being a summer class, we were responsible for 9 short papers - one per week, including a mandatory sketch - in lieu of a midterm, so there was more last-minute scrabbling around than is usual (at least in my case). Personally, she was also a nice change from the usual hyper-intensity that seems to be such a part of the Columbia Art History experience, both in terms of faculty and students alike. While trying pretty hard not to feed us the usual endlessly-recycled platitudes about figures like Rambrandt and Monet - she frequently worked insightful observations about the formal structures of the works we were looking at into her lectures - she was, at the same time, open to comments, seemed to genuinely appreciate differing points of view, and, sometime during the semester, realized that sitting down with us - as opposed to delivering a monologue from behind a podium in the time-honoured, hierarchy-conscious tradition of the hallowed halls of Ivy League academia - really helped to put students at their ease and to facilitate participation, so she began doing that a lot. It was small, but telling, gesture. (Or maybe she was just tired from standing up so much.) My section benefited from a lot of students who seemed really engaged and invested in the material, so class discussion managed, most of the time, to steer clear of the soporific monotony that happens so often at this school. Now the cons: While allowing us quite a bit of leeway to explore personal ideas and interests, the work requirement (see above) got to be a bit much. A short paper a week may not sound like a lot, but it piles up - especially if you're taking other classes like I was. The atmosphere in the classroom also felt a little strange at times - there were strong undercurrents of competitiveness - but that sort of comes with the territory with a discussion-heavy class like this one, and not really the instructor's fault.

Jun 2008

Sarah is a Belgian with a heart of gold. She totally understands that Art Hum is a required core class, and that most of her students will have little or no experience analyzing art. Her lectures are based on powerpoint slides that can get a little dull, but mainly she presents the required info so that it is at least mildly appealing. You take a few trips to the Met (on your own time, very manageable and even enjoyable), are assigned readings that you should NOT bother to read, and write a few easy papers, encompassing the majority of the class. There is a midterm and a final, but both are standard (ID's, comparisons, etc) and not difficult. As long as you do the assignment she asks, and put in a little bit of effort, you'll get an A on your project/paper. She's one of the nicest and most understanding professors at Columbia, so consider yourself lucky if you wind up forcefully learning about art in her presence.

Jun 2008

Professor Renner knows her subject matter well and clearly conveys the material to students—if only she was as equally convinced of these points as her students! She is a sweet and bright young grad student prone to providing entertaining quips about artists and their work (“he was a bit self-absorbed,” “I find the painting rather boring”) along with formal analyses. I appreciate how she calls on students to participate because many are reluctant to approach art, having been indoctrinated to academia through literary exegeses. Her fault is her diffidence, which appears in her frequent apologies for having to flip back and forth between slides or misusing a word (don’t we all?). Nonetheless, she is well-qualified for instruction, providing clear and fair assignments that neatly serve their purposes and insightful comments on corrected work. Her discussion of American architecture is particularly interesting, given that is her area of focus.

May 2008

She is an unbelievable professor. Extremely knowledgable with regards to the syllabus, but also pretty understanding with grading. Ventilla doesn't take bullshit answers, but, and I know this sounds corny-- she is funny and serious, and will make you appreciate art in a whole new way.

May 2008

I definitely recommend taking Kyle's Art Hum class. He is a great teacher who really encourages classroom participation. His classroom atmosphere is extremely laid-back, but I felt like I really took away a lot from the class and gained an appreciation for viewing different types of art. There is no midterm or final in the class because he finds it unnecessary to force his students to memorize hundreds of paintings and dates. Instead, there are three papers throughout the semester in which students are allowed to pick any painting of their choice from museums around the city to study.

May 2008

Great professor. Makes the class very entertaining and interesting while still teaching a lot. Down-to-earth and very accessible. Now when I go to art museums (which I now like to do) I can really look at the art meaningfully. Fair grader, fair but not simple exams, little to no work exceot for the final paper. Take this class!

Apr 2008

Erin Thompson is one of the best teachers that I've had at Columbia. She makes art interesting AND understands the pressures that we have at Columbia, such that it's a very enjoyable class that you actually want to go to. I enjoyed her slides and how she made me think about art in a totally different perspective and I feel like a better person for it. I wish that more of my teachers were like her.

Apr 2008

I took this class last year and let me just say how amazing this woman is. She is always actively trying to engage the class in understanding the art we study. She excels at giving everyone an equal opportunity to have a say and really makes this class a pleasure to take.

Apr 2008

I liked her. I thought that she was very knowledgable, and an engaging lecturer. She was very clear about what she expected from her class, and spoke very well of the guidelines and criteria that she wanted to see reflected in the assignments. Hang in there and you'll be fine. Recommended for seniors finished with most of their reqs, so that they can commit themselves to doing the readings, going all out on the papers and sketches and memorizing the slides. If you can go all out on the papers, you WILL get an A (no mystery here).

Feb 2008

Holger is extremely pleasant and though he is the director of Art Humanities, dont let this scare you! The workload is small, the papers aren't bad, and the tests are really fair. He really allows even amateurs (like myself) gain an appreciation for art! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

Jan 2008

I took this class the previous year, and I must admit that I actually enjoyed going to class and learn about art. I knew absolutely nothing when I enrolled in the class but came away with a good sense of how to analyze art after the semester was over. The core has its share of bad professors, but Prof. Cuenot definitely is not one of them. She created a relaxed environment in which most of the students participated in the discussion unlike other core classes that I have been in. As a side note, she is also easy on the eyes. Highly recommended!

Jan 2008

Craig is a super nice guy with very realistic expectations for a required class. Though the arthum syllabus covers an impossible breadth of subjects in a very short semester, Craig explains everything concisely, and if you pay attention, makes sure that you are well prepared for his tests. Though sometimes he struggled to keep class discussion going, it was a 9am class, so I think he did very well with what he had.

Jan 2008

Denise Budd is top of the line. Her lectures are well organized, fast paced, and entertaining: she's one of the funniest and most concise lecturers I've had at the university. Along with that, she's an extremely fair (and often, generous) grader, taking both improvement and effort in to consideration. I could write on and on, but there's really only one thing you need to know about her class: take it.

Jan 2008

Professor Drimmer makes this required course worth taking. The class was nowhere near as boring and irrelevant as I thought it would be, but she is also not a push-over. Professor Drimmer is funny, engaging, and informative during class. She also encourages participation, and starts from the basics so that nothing and no one is lost. I actually enjoyed this class, which was completely unexpected. If you take the papers and exams seriously, pay attention, and participate in class, you can definately achieve an A/A-.

Dec 2007

Definitely a good choice for Art Hum. Despite my respect for it, I don't ever expect to get into a good Core class knowing that the spectrum of the quality of instructors is quite spread. Prof. Hunter makes Art Hum painless. She is quirky and funny, even though the lectures can still be a bit of a bore. Any art enthusiast will like her class and it is certainly endurable for others. You can't ask for a better art hum professor (I'm not saying she's the best, but since you must choose at random for art hum, you can't complain if you get her). The workload is light, but you still learn about what you need to know. Basically, you'll get out of this course what Columbia hopes all students get out of art hum. She trains you well enough in formal analysis and the history behind the artists and their works. You can take as much or as little as you like from this class while still having a good experience.

Dec 2007

Katherine Kasdorf does a good job of trying to condense 5000 years of art into one semester. Sometimes it feels like a whirlwind because there is so much to get through, but she is always clear and well informed in her lectures. If there’s anything she doesn’t know (a rarity given how well prepared she always is), even the most trivial minutia about a work, she find the answer and email it to you or bring it up next class. The first few weeks of class were a little stale, but once we got past the initial introduction the class and her lectures were fascinating. She actively encouraged class participation. If you were dead wrong about something she never cut you off at the knees like some professors, but you learned quickly to interpret her “That’s interesting,” or even worse “Hmmm” as quiet negations. Sometimes it is a little difficult to remember all of the many Indian names, places, and dynasties but she is generally forgiving in her grading. If there is ever anything you don’t understand she will spend as long as you need helping you to understand. She answers emails almost instantaneously, which is actually kind of spooky. Do all of the readings. She doesn’t really cover them in class, but they will help you understand the material better and give you some great points for the midterm and final. There is a fair bit of memorization of names, dates, and places, but that is pretty much par for the course for Ahum classes. Ahum is often one of those dreaded core requirements, but Professor Kasdorf makes this class something you will look forward to attending twice a week and at the end of the semester you will feel a little disappointed that it has to end.

Dec 2007

Professor Denise Budd is one unbelievable, unbelievable, unbelievable lady (Yes, she deserves every “unbelievable”). She is so passionate about art history, art restoration, Renaissance art (her expertise), and most of all, about sharing her knowledge and ardor. Even though we sit in a dark classroom on the mornings, there are only a few sleepy eyes in the room. Professor Budd puts her whole heart and energy into making every class coherent and intriguing. Unless hit with amnesia, I will never forget anything from the Parthenon to Pollock to her hilarious anecdotes about the crazy artists whose works we study. Professor Budd took us on a personal tour around the Met (Metropolitan Museum of Art) twice and also St. John the Divine Cathedral. I can honestly say that I have never been more entertained and amused in my life…nor have I ever learned so much in a single hour. She has generated an enthusiasm in all of us for sculpture, architecture, and painting. She fuels this by allowing us great flexibility on every paper and then supporting us on each of these intellectual endeavors. For the final paper, I had only mentioned my idea to her and was thus thoroughly surprised and delighted to find a lengthy email that evening with her ideas and resources to explore. She turned our once mostly apathetic class into a room of art aficionados. Everyone seems highly invested in their papers and stroll in with proud smiles the day they hand them over. Even when we have disappointed her a bit, she still wears the sincerest grin and gives us generous chances to make amends and learn the material wholeheartedly. You can tell that Professor Budd genuinely cares for every student and for the course material. She seems to know everything about art and makes a real effort to know each student. Furthermore, she brings cheer to every class with her candy, anecdotes, fervor, and humor. Professor Budd is zest, zeal, and everything you would want in a professor and in ArtHum...

Dec 2007

Like the other reviews say, Kyle is a great teacher. I tell all my friends to try to get him for their teacher. I genuinely enjoyed everything we learned in class, and not having a final or midterm certainly made it that much better, especially come finals week. The three papers were fairly straight forward--write about a piece of art. He'll even look at a draft a week before. That said, I wouldn't necessarily slack off in this class. Participate, look at some paintings before class (takes 15 minutes) and do a few of the readings. It really helps, plus he likes to know you do something. Definitely stay in his class if you're lucky enough to get him, he's an example of great teaching at Columbia.

Dec 2007

She's really a superb teacher. She takes the effort to find out new stuff relevant to her lectures and she's always willing to admit if shes not entirely clear about the subject. Though the subject(esp the architecture portion) may be boring sometimes, she makes the effort to make the material interesting, and she comes up with the legends and myths and ideas behind these art pieces effortlessly. Overall shes an amazing instructor, I highly recommend taking her as she answers emails extremely fast, and is even willing to review your essays before you hand it in. She gives helpful tips for the exams and also makes it easier for us to memorize the abstract indian names by omitting some tedious details

Nov 2007

I took Art Hum with her last spring (2007). Let me say, she was amazing. I am not the art-type, I had absolutely NO desire to take the class and go on the museum visits, etc. and managed to get an A- doing little work However, as the semester went on I actually managed to enjoy the class (except for drawing Low Library in the freezing cold). Going to class is a must - you *need* her comments on the paintings to make studying for the exams easier - also - make yourself flashcards for the exams - know the names, dates, etc. for all paintings.

Nov 2007

Probably as good as you're going to get for this required course. He's really laid back, gives no exams, and helps even the most novice art critics form an argument about a piece of work. Highly recommended, just remember to try and assert yourself a little bit and speak at least once a class. He won't call out people who don't speak, but it certainly helped me grade wise participating just once or twice a lecture.

Sep 2007

Wonderful. Truly a great teacher. This is one of the few classes that I've been in where EVERYONE in the class participated willingly, and where the professor not only lead the discussion well, but managed to teach us a huge amount while letting us explore themes and ideas as a class. I knew nothing about art coming into the class, and now feel like I can walk into a museum and talk intelligently. If you get Nicole for Art Hum, consider yourself VERY lucky.

Jul 2007

Prof. Higonet was an interesting lecturer, but I would not take this course as the grading was very arbitrary. Although she did not lead discussion sections, she took samples from our papers (which were partially based on discussion) and graded them herself. Some of the exam questions were written in an unclear way and did not make much sense even when explained. Still, the exams were graded very harshly. At the podium, she seems friendly and carismatic, but in person she comes across as petty and mean spirited, especially if you talk to her about your grade. This is a professor that confuses "challenging" with "punishing," and your grade will suffer for it.

May 2007

Mr. Neely is cocky, arrogant, and declarative. But that's not a bad thing. He's great. He'll be missed (this was his last semester as an instructor, according to him). He's a little mis-leading when it came to the mid-term, but when the guy meets you at the museum and walks you through the works...he's smart and passionate. He'll answer every question, and NEVER make you feel dumb. He respects you. He was a tough grader, but overall Mr. Neely will be very successful where ever he ends up. He could be a little more tech savvy, but hey...he's an art historian...

May 2007

Just about the worst professor one could ask for in this topic, Rottner conveys absolutely no passion for this course. She is stiff, uncomfortable, and will make your life in this class most unpleasant. While the grading is easier on the essays, the exams are graded harshly (and they count most). There are many art hum teachers to choose from. This one was a poor choice for me, and I regretted the entire semester long.

May 2007

Avoid this woman at all costs. She WILL NOT grade you according to your ability to analyze and think deeply about art, rather, will dwell over totally irrelevant bullcrap such as sentence placement in papers and meaningless dates (to the year) that provide absolutely no form of enrichment or value.

May 2007

I agree strongly with the previous review. Prof Vischak is great, and I strongly recommend taking Art Hum with her if possible. A typical class consisted of coming in, seeing showing a slideshow of 10 to 20 slides of whatever era's art we were working on. Lots of comparisons to previous artists we looked at. The discussion went smoothly, and Prof Vischak did a great job getting people to join in to the conversation, which was generally very interesting and engaging. The field trips were a lot of fun. Though it could be painful to roll out of bed and get to the Met on a saturday morning, she made it worth your while. This class has given me an interest in and appreciation for art that I completely lacked previously.

Apr 2007

Though cold calling is always unpleasant, she is a great instructor. Her approach to the material as a very technical one, and she akss for substance, not bs, out of her students. She is very engaging, and nice, and her awkward attempts at humor can come off as condescending, but are not mean spirited. You will learn and mostly enjoy during this class. Her museum visits are great.

Apr 2007

Erin makes art interesting. She encourages fascinating discussions which improved throughout the semester due to the increased knowledge of the students and the unintimidating atmosphere she promotes. Less interested in requiring you to memorize tons of dates and bios, she encourages an appreciation of art that allows the student to discuss an unknown work in an inciteful way. I, now, go to art museums more often and regularly invite friends to come along. The final paper is wonderful. Erin meets with each student to find a topic specific to the individual. I was able to incorporate my major in my paper (and was suprised to find a lot of research on it).

Apr 2007

I completely agree with the other reviews. Dr. Harkett was an AMAZING professor. I went into art hum not expecting to get anything out of it, but his teaching style is so clear and interesting that I ended up learning so much. He doesn't make you remember dates/names/particular paintings, but rather focuses on seeing the links between different art works and being able to discuss them. Very light reading (10 pages max, ever), no bs that most people have to do. A really engaged, competent, and overall fabulous professor. Also, If you can, go on his trips to the MoMA and the Met; they are interesting and he's a great guy.

Apr 2007

The previous review, by way of fulmination, makes a few factual observations: 1) She did put up images and ask us what we thought about them with the intent that we say what we thought about them. 2) She did lock the door once class started. On one occasion a student on crutches arrived late, for whom she realized she needed to make an exception. 3) She mostly avoided sharing her own opinions and positions, especially before we'd vocalized ours. I agree with these factual observations. I disagree with the conclusions drawn. She explained her rationale for (2) at the beginning of the semester -- that class time is valuable, particularly so for this type of class, and it's not fair to waste others' time -- and I appreciated being treated like a grown-up. I was late once. Felt like an idiot. Didn't make that mistake again. Come to think of it, I also appreciated (1) and (3) for the same reason. Sometimes it annoyed me that she wouldn't tell us what she thought; more often it annoyed me that she wouldn't dangle the conversational carrot a little lower; always I wound up being glad, in the end, that we'd been forced to find our own way out of the wilderness. The primary goal of Art Hum is to teach us to speak intelligently about art whenever we come across it. We practiced this every class session. That's good teaching. I found Catherine highly conscientious in her approach. She quietly succeeded in raising my level of discourse about (and interest in) art.

Mar 2007

Johanna - Jody - is a sweetheart who will give you a ton of help if you just ask for it. Her only problem, in my view, is that she has that "new teacher" air about her - she's perhaps a little brusque, and a VERY tough grader, as she wants to stamp her authority on the class. If you can see past that, you'll get the most out of her.

Jan 2007

Eric is a really good teacher. He spends a good amount of time on each unit so you really get a good overview of art and architecture. Things are explained clearly and he encourages a great deal of discussion which I think made the class less boring. As other reviewers mentioned, he does grade the papers quite tough but I feel in the end most people end up doing well in the course and I definitely left the course with a much greater appreciation of art.

Jan 2007

Quirky, funny, a bit obsessed with himself. I think he grades harder than other art hum sections by far.

Jan 2007

Good course, Horrific instructor!!! Be warned...This TA is overwhelmingly patronizing, egotistic, dogmatic and disinterested in what her students have to say...she seems at times to derive an almost perverted pleasure out of constantly cold calling students, and then condescendingly ignores any comment she deems unworthy, despite being inanely unsure and unsteady in her own knowledge base. She seems to consistently contradict herself and maintains virtually no clarity in her most confusing and convoluted lecture style. I find it necessary to point out, for the benefit of fellow Culpa readers, that I am not some bitter student crying about a poor grade: I did not even finish the course (I dropped the course at the last possible moment) despite finding the workload to be extraordinarily manageable and the material fairly graspable...I simply could not stand the insane tone she took with students and ultimately found no remote interest or compassion on her part in the endeavor of teaching itself, but rather an aggravation and annoyance with her students that gave me a pounding headache after each and every class!!! If you get this instructor, I would highly recommend switching sections...her antics are, in my opinion, utterably inexcusable!

Jan 2007

Absolutely brilliant and amazing professor. If you have Daniel Harkett for your Art Hum professor, consider yourself blessed. I could not think of a better way to get through Art Hum. He is nice, funny, understanding and does a very excellent job of guiding and encouraging great class discussion. Never a boring day. He also does a great job of making everyone feel heard and that everyone's opinion is valid. He's also the only Art Hum professor I know of that made it all the way to Warhol (most people seemed to have fallen behind on the syllabus - not Dr. Harkett), and even left us on the last day of class with "How to Use Art Hum" The workload is very light, but this is better because it guarantees that most people will have done the reading, which also helps to enrich the class discussion. His paper topics were very interesting, and he really put great effort into commenting extensively on everyone's ideas - not only what was wrong, but how it could be made better. He gives you the questions for the midterm and final in advance, so you can prep for them ahead of time. Truly great class, and truly great professor. Recommended with all my heart.

Jan 2007

Wonderful. Professor Vischak's frank commentary, dry sense of humor and considerable knowledge of and interest in the pieces we looked at made my first experience with art history a very good one. Her personal area of interest is ancient Egypt, which sadly doesn't feature in the Art Hum syllabus, but she slipped in a few pieces during the first half of the course which made for really interesting comparisons. The best part of the class, not surprisingly, was the discussion, and she was great at giving people opportunities to speak [and occasionally, when the situation called for it, tactfully getting them to stop speaking]. I learned a lot about art, and about history. Thanks, Professor Vischak - cocktail party conversations, here I come.

Jan 2007

Take this class. He's a good teacher, the lectures are usually interesting, and there is NO MIDTERM OR FINAL. The class is heavy on class participation and if you don't talk a lot you'll get screwed when it comes time for grades, but there's very little work required outside class. The class is also pretty fun since all you do is argue about what you see in the piece of artwork. He's not an easy grader, but you can get through this class with almost no work at all and still get a B+ or better.

Jan 2007

Erin was a great art hum teacher. Lots of people complain about this class but it was really entertaining, interesting and informative. Her teaching style was pretty laid back while still engaging the class with her questions and random amusing commentary or info on the works we looked at. You really will thoroughly enjoy this class.

Jan 2007

I highly recommend trying to get Kyle for Art Hum. He had a laid-back approach that I found really helped in keeping the class enjoyable. He knows an incredible amount of information about art- he was always offering different facts and suggestions that changed the way the class viewed the piece of art that was being examined. He realized that many people have no interest in art, so he didn't force people to enter the discussion. He had a good sense of humor that prevented the people in my class from falling asleep. One thing I didn't expect (but liked) was when he told us that the idea of any interpretation being valid was wrong; art is not usually an anything-goes type of subject. When someone offered an incorrect interpretation, Kyle would tell them it was wrong, but would move on without making a big deal out of it.

Jan 2007

If you find Professor Heuer's name revealed once you register for Art Hum, consider yourself blessed. Professor Heuer is not only incredibly outgoing and helpful, but he truly enjoys the subject matter and goes out of his way to make classes interesting and encourages engagement from the class (participation is 20% of your grade--and a nice booster when the final grade is calculated). The class doesn't concentrate on a massive amount of material, so it's great to have a professor who goes in depth of the material that your are responsible for knowing on exams. I can't extol this man's greatness enough! He is wonderful and you will love the class no matter what your major is.

Dec 2006

Ugh! Michelle, Michelle, Michelle. There is good news and bad news. You should take her course. She is pretty straightforward about her expectations, it's easy if you study adequately, and she'll meet with you 1-1 and be helpful. Lecture, however, will make you want to shoot yourself. She asks really dumb questions and then when nobody wants to be the fool to answer them, she thinks we don't know the answers, so she just asks worse questions. She moved at a VERY slow pace and we did not even finish the syllabus. We spent 4 classes on the Parthenon and half a class on Jackson Pollock. She seems very nervous and not in control of herself, she laughs nervously and paces back and forth in class. She also freaks out when her technology isn't working perfectly. All in all it's an ok way to get the requirement out of the way, but the tradeoff for an easy class is a BORING class.

Dec 2006

What an idiot. Her idea of fostering class discussion throughout the semester was throwing up an image and saying: "what do you guys think about that?" Our motley crew somehow managed to overcome this abortive approach to teaching and strike up our own conversations, no thanks to "roach." What else can I say about her non-teaching style? Oh yes, remember not to show up more than two minutes late otherwise she locks the door and doesn't let you in. "The ship has sailed," she once remarked when a student on crutches was banging and yelling for her to open up. What a hateful woman. Ask her to explicate her own position on anything and she stares blankly before telling the class that there's "no time" for her opinions. Don't allow "roach" to crawl into your life.

Dec 2006

I went into Art Hum expecting to absolutely hate the class, but it turned out to be one of my favorite ever at Columbia simply because of Emily. She is a very smart and caring instructor. She really wants everyone to learn and gain insight into the material she teaches. She demands respect but is oftentimes fun and sarcastic. If you're in her section for Art Hum, consider yourself lucky. Emily is fabulous.

Dec 2006

People (many people) have told me that Art Hum was a terrible class, so I was expecting it to be awful, but it wasn't at all. Ms. Cuenot is very friendly and very approachable, and also has a very strong background in art history. The class is a series of structured discussions, which she generally managed to lead in a productive direction. Of course, the fact that it is a sub-intro-level pseudo-art history class meant that some of the discussions were a little repetetive, but that is a problem of the cirriculum more than the teacher. Much more emphasis on looking at the work and seeing what there is to be seen than on historical minutiae. If you already have some sense of how to talk about art, the class is a breeze. Highly recommended (given that you have to take it with someone).

Dec 2006

If you end up in her class, you are set for the most enjoyable and light workload course for a semester. Sweet and caring professor. I was basically art retarded, (didn't know ANYTHING about it) before I walked into her class. Since then, she really taught me how to look at a piece of art critically. She's probably one of the best art hum teacher there is. Well it was her first semester teaching, but she was very good at it. Everyone in the class loved her. Tips: Goto class (she emails you if you are MIA), Read the stuff (it's only 15 pages and it makes a whole world of difference both in your learning and class participation) and lastly participate. I don't see how anyone can do bad in her class. Shes just an absolute sweetheart. Take this class at all cost.

Dec 2006

Professor Delbanco is the greatest! ever, hands down. This was my favorite class of the semester and probably favorite professor of all my semesters here. She isnt like all the other art hum teachers, where you learn slide after slide. For her class, you actually learn how to analyze art and you feel like you know so much more at the end of the course. I am so glad I had her, as my interest in art has greatly expanded. She is brilliant. Take this class if you care about learning how to view a painting intelligently. She is the best!

Dec 2006

Judging by my peers' experiences with Art Hum, this course could have been a bore but Evan brought the material to life. He would answer every question posed in class in detail and was always willing to meet up outside of class to dicuss any art-related questions. He planned multiple trips to the Met, MoMA, and various galleries in an effort to accommodate our busy schedules. At the end of the term, I visited the Met again with a friend (not from CU) and she was amazed at the amount of knowledge I had about Western art. The best part was that I didn't even notice that I had learned all this information about art because the class was so enjoyable. If you want to have a meaningful Art Hum experience -- take it with Evan Neely.

Dec 2006

Richard, who asks that you call him Ricky, is probably one of the best Art Hum instructors. He tries to ask questions that really get the discussion going, while acknowledging the class's skepticism about some of the works. He is not one of those instructors who gets visibly angry and offended when he you don't like the art. He's interested in knowing which materials we like or hate, and doesn't force the discussion when it is obvious that there is no interest. Participation counts and he does call on people, but it isn't annoying like some instructors. Papers are reasonably graded and exams should not be difficult if you paid attention to class discussions. As long as you attempt to analyze the works and give information that is actually relevant and thoughtful, you should do moderately well. Exams are art IDs of both studied and unstudied works, comparisons of works, and analysis. All in all, the class is enjoyable even if you find Art History completely boring.

Dec 2006

Art Hum, in the hands of the wrong person, can quickly become a boring parade of who's who in Western Art. Thankfully, Evan was not the wrong person. His lectures were compelling, challenging, and interesting. He always encouraged classroom discussion, allowing for minor tangents while still maintaining enough control to cover the necessary topics. Evan also always went out of his way to accommodate for his students' schedules - planning extra trips to the Met, MoMA, and PS.1 so that all interested students could go to these places with him and hear his lectures there. I really enjoyed this class and highly recommend him as a teacher!

Dec 2006

Professor Heuer is amazing. He was certainly the best professor I had in a Core class. He is thoughtful and insightful, always drawing helpful connections to help smooth out the often jaring Art Hum syllabus. He's also incredibly patient and approachable and leads discussions extremely well. Plus, he wears a suit to every class. I really can't say enough good things about this man.

Dec 2006

Anna Vallye was really terrible and stifling. She has very strict ideas about what each piece of art was about and its importance and was completely uninterested in exploring any other possible perspectives. She completely took the joy out of looking at and interpreting art. Vallye acted as though each art was some sort of math equation that needed precise figuring out and had a correct answer. It was definitely the worst and most frustrating class I have ever taken at Columbia, and I love art. If you want to be able to recite the names of some paintings, and could care less about art- take her class- she is easy to zone out and won't notice you playing suduko, but if you have any interest in art -avoid her, she will try to convince you that every art piece is as boring and straight forward as she is.

Nov 2006

While I agree that at first Mr. Neely seems totally pompous, once you get used to him, he is hilarious. He assigned no reading, and realized that we are all forced to take this class. This meant that he made sure to make it enjoyable and about understanding the actual art, rather than the published critique of the art. He also was willing to meet students in pairs at the various museums to discuss art for papers, which is amazing because it is like having your own personal docent for almost an hour! Mr. Neely is a great teacher, and a pretty cool guy as well. Take his class.

Nov 2006

I took Erin's class last year and by now I have to say that she was the nicest teacher so far at CU. She is passionate about art, young and fun. She appreciates all opinions and is very fair about a student not liking a piece of art. She is also honest about her dislike of Pollock, etc. Her grading is very fair and I did learn so much. She made Art History such fun. If you have to take "Masterpieces of Western Art" I recommend Erin highly.

Oct 2006

I actually still couldn't believe that art hum couldn be such a totally HORRIBLE experience. I have done music hum, lit hum and cc all pretty well, learnt a lot about humanities and the core in general, and really wouldn't expect art hum can be so bad with Harrist. This man, like what reviews below said, is totally stubborn, and will only listen to answers that he's looking for. He calls people during classes, and you almost can't express your own opinions because if it's different from his, he will just shake his head with a nasty face, mumbling "hmmm, no, not quite." I so regret that I haven't dropped this class - CC drop date has passed and I was too busy applying for jobs earlier in the semester that, very unfortunately, I have to stick with this stubborn old man for the rest of the semester. What makes him even worse is, he's is really a harsh grader. I did pretty well in other humanities classes, getting almost all As and A-'s, but from the first paper I got a C+ from him. Totally speechless.

Sep 2006

Dr. Sheehan is a pretty good professor. I am definitely not an art person, yet she managed to make some of the topics fairly interesting. Our class was very interpretive; unlike most other Art Hum classes, we didnt have to memorize pictures and names and dates; we had to analyze the pieces (it sounds hard but it's really not). There were 3 papers, each 3-4 pages, dealing with an analysis of 1 or 2 works. Also a final; before the final we were given a list of 16 possible essay questions (which the class prepared and she edited) and the final consisted of 2 of them (no choice of the questions on the exam). For the final, you do have to think of some works from memory-you wont have the pictures in front of you-but it is really not too bad. A good teacher who cares about her students and the subject, though a bit flaky at times.

Sep 2006

Christina is a very interesting lecturer and a great instructor. Be aware, this art hum section is most definitly not an easy A. She is a graduate student in 19th century art. Her met museum trips are great. the papers can be difficult because you are not relaly sure what she is looking for. you will learn A TON about art and art history, it is definitly worth it to take this class.

Aug 2006

Meredith was a terrific art hum instructor. She was always energetic, approachable, and funny, despite the class being early, while at the same time always being in control of the class and really knowing her stuff. I came away from her class actually liking art history and having learned a lot from her. She's really cool and down to earth, and the atmosphere was really relaxed and unintimidating. The work load wasn't bad at all, and she made the class trips worth our time. If you get Meredith, you'll be glad you did.

Jun 2006

Professor Heuer might have been the best instructor that I have had at Columbia in my first two years here. He is extremely knowledgable of not only the course material but also pretty much anything having to do with those time periods as well. His delivery is mostly lecture but encourages participation from the class through asking questions and also various exercises of analyzing works (in fact class participation accounts for 20% of your grade). There are readings assigned for each week but they are really uneccessary to do weel in the class although many of them are quite interesting. If you pay attention in class you will be rewarded with not only a good grade but also feeling that you learned something and enjoyed yourself. I would definitely take any class that Professor Heuer taught.

May 2006

Absolutely awesome. Lynn is a great professor and an extremely cool woman. She proved a major work in an Italian museum is a forgery so she obviously knows what she's talking about. She is extremely accomodating and easy going. At first, it feels like you aren't learning much because her teaching style is very relaxed and casual, but after a while I realized I was learning much more than I had thought possible (me being a math-econ major). She is extremely flexible on deadlines and is always willing to meet outside of class to help. Art Hum was by far one of the best experiences I've had at Columbia and it's basically completely because of Lynn.

May 2006

Dr. Bentz is a tough grader and she expects more of her Art Hum class than most other Art Hum profs, but in the end you'll be grateful that she was so hard-core. She has an extensive knowledge of the material, her lectures are well-organized, and you'll leave the class having learned so much. It's a more-than-average amount of work, but it's definitely worthwhile.

May 2006

This man embodies everything the Core stands for. Workload is light (close to minimal). Readings of 5 -6 pages per class (can you imagine that?) Grading is by far the fairest among all the core classes I've taken: 20% Class participation 45% Three 3-page papers (15% each) 15% Midterm exam 20% Final exam For the final and midterm, he gives us the questions two weeks before hand (6 to be precise), and chooses 2 for the paper itself. He allows us to bring in whatever we want (even a full-length essay) -- so none of that bullshit memorising of dates and ids. This is one of the core classes where I really enjoyed myself, where the stress level was next to nothing -- and yet this was the class where I learnt that most from. His teaching style is very inclusive, where he integrates class participation seamlessly into his comments. For the final class, we actually used the art hum techniques we learnt to analyse a portrait of George Bush (can you imagine that?). Great professor, and by far one of the best I've ever encountered in Columbia.

May 2006

Smart professor but has no clue that this is a survey course. She's led by unbending, inflexible, illogical rules. She might be a great professor candidate for graduates but she definitely has neither the personable skills nor the professional knowledge on what the course is supposed to be about. Her persnickety grammar & writing style corrections make students feel like elementary school again. She is a "B-" quality teacher. No better.

May 2006

Like all teachers, Christina has her strong points and her negative points. What is important: GOOD - she is fun and has a sense of humor - she presents the material in an easy, straightforward manner - she makes an effort to be available out of class/at museums for those who want extra help - she clearly knows the subject really well BAD - she is a tough grader - her classes can ocassionally get a little boring when spending hours looking at the same picture - the exams were a lot of memorizing dates to within +/- 2 years... kind of pointless considering no one is going to remember any of it in 10 days time

May 2006

Eric Anderson does a great job of teaching art hum. He can be a harsh grader, but he is really fair. He motivates each student to take the class seriously and really apply themselves. I saw a significant improvement throughout the course in my art history writing based on his input and feedback, but it did take more work than I thought the class would. The ID's on the midterm were pretty easy as long as you memorize anything you've seen in the class. The midterm also had three twenty minute comparative essays which were not easy, but if you apply the concepts learned in class you can do fine. Instead of giving a final and fourth paper (as per the syllabus), Eric gave a final project because he felt the class did pretty well on the midterm. This is just an example of Eric's dynamic and flexible approach to the class. If you're looking for an art hum class that challenges you and engages your writing skills, Eric is the prof for you.

May 2006

Ok she's really not that bad. She will make you work extremely hard for your grade and yes it is very beneficial to talk to her about your papers in advance so she knows what she wants. While she has some irritating quriks, she's still definitely a nice person, really cares about art and her students learning and tries to connect with them. She is still very new at teaching and you can tell she is learning a bit as she goes along but she is quite smart and constantly trying to improve. This might not be your first choice for art hum, but certaintly shouldn't be your last either. It is possible to do very very well in this class if you are willing to put some effort into it.

May 2006

Roland structures the class in a very straightforward manner, so you know exactly what she wants of you. If you're looking to get through this requirement without an excessive amount of work but also desire to acquire a basic knowledge of the masterpieces of western art, Roland is a great option. She grades essays fairly, and the midterm and final weren't too difficult if you put in some study time. All in all, the class was very 'chill.' She never even addressed anyone by name (thought this was kind of strange, it really made no difference to me). The reading is almost non-existent for this class. She posts short reading assignments for each artist, but they were rarely discussed in class (so you don't need to do them if you don't want to). Just show up, take good notes, study for the exams, and you'll do great.

May 2006

This guy is stellar. Heuer is a very smart guy who knows how to put together a compelling lecture. He integrates every artist into a coherent span and discusses the open-ended questions of art criticism in a manner devoid of pretension and jargon (if only some of the authors of the assigned readings did the same). He's very funny and approachable, knows how to run a class discussion, keeps the class moving at a great pace... I can honestly say that he provided one of those great Core experiences that validates Columbia's brochures. If you get him, you'll have lucked out. I mean, the guy inspires attendance.

May 2006

I absolutely loved Professor Bouche. She's a great professor and obviously knows a lot about the art we learned in class. She never gave us busy work; the assignments that she gave were really meant to teach us something - for example, the problems of drawing a 3D object into a 2D paper. If you get her for art hum, consider yourself extremely lucky!

May 2006

Erin is simply one of my favorite teachers out all the ones I've had so far at Columbia. She's really cool and laid back, and she makes class interesting by giving funny miscellaneous tidbits on artists while she's lecturing. She doesn't stress all the formal elements of paintings (which I'am extremely grateful for because I'm sure the class would have bored me to death if she had) but highlights the most important ones. She also dislikes views that go like "The twist of the woman's finger shows how tortured the artist's soul was" and all that bs. The worst thing you can do is try to interpret an artwork without actual evidence to back it up. One more thing, she's picky about writing so make sure to check your papers before turning them in! None of the assignments she gave us was hard, nor did it take very long to do them. Overall, she's a great art hum teacher and you'll luck out if you get her.

Apr 2006

Sarah is a really nice teacher and class really isn't bad at all, in fact enjoyable and moves along quite efficiently. She tries to get you to really speak up and talk about the art and is very good at taking what you have to say and connecting your somewhat simple comment to an overarching theme. The papers, three of them, are quite easy and the grading is pretty easy. The midterm was fair in terms of the what was presented and what was tested. If you are an art history major with maximal interest in the subject I would suggest looking for a harder more challenging class. If you are testing your boundaries or just fulfilling the requirement this is a great class. Sarah does a good job introducing you to the field of art history.

Apr 2006

A really nice, good-intentioned professor who has high expectations for class but helps make the course enjoyable and stimulating. He fosters a hands-off approach to learning that allows students to draw their own informed conclusions.

Jan 2006

If you are reading this review, its probably because you have been assigned to Dr. Sheehan by the core office and you're trying to decide whether or not to stay in the class. DROP THIS CLASS. In my opinion, the work you put into the class and your own knowledge of art are almost entirely irrelevant in determining the grade you will receive. Instead, to me, the best way to get a good grade is to pander to the professor's own views on each subject. As another reviewer noted, the paper topics she assigned would require 20 pages to respond in a manner she would find satisfactory, but of course she will not allow any paper length extensions. In order to get anywhere near an appropriate grade on a paper, you have to bring it to her and argue your point in her office hours. However, she is extremely inaccessible in office hours, because all the other students will have figured out that they have argue their points to her in person as well. Therefore despite the fact that she gives her time generously, you will find it very difficult to do well on the papers because the open questions have behind them a very specific and hidden agenda, deviation from which will only yield a mediocre grade. In office hours it often seemed that she had not even read the paper students needed help with. She worked very hard to prepare for lectures, which were enlightening, but had virtually no knowledge of art outside of the lecture she had reviewed and her field of study. Students were often surprised at artists with whom she was unfamiliar, and on field trips she often attributed works to the wrong artist.

Jan 2006

Professor Powell is the bomb! Agreeing with the previous poster, she is one of the smartest and best teachers I have ever had at Columbia or anywhere else. She absolutely knows her stuff, but is very open to others' opinions. You're never afraid to share your interpretation of a piece of art in her class. I went into this class dreading it and came out wishing it was 2 semester long because there are so many artists I would have loved her to share with us. Definitely try to take a class with her. You won't be sorry.

Jan 2006

Jody has a pleasant demeanor in class, seems to really care about the class, and makes herself available. Her presentation is pretty good although she does spend a bit too much time on class discussion. She is a tough grader and gave both a difficult and time-constrained midterm and final. There are definitely easier instructors for Art Hum, and it's probably worth it to look else where as she does not offer anything that seems to be so unique.

Jan 2006

I really liked Bouche. Every day before class she would sit and talk w/ us, joking around. She always took extra care to make her own slide shows, saying that the ones provided by the department were insufficient. She really tried to encourage us to say what we thought about each piece and really did make the class worth going to every day. I came out of there w/ a much better appreciation of fine art. I'm saying this despite the fact that I had to take it at 9am. She didn't make us buy any books or do any reading either. Her assignments were creative and fun (the first thing she had us do was to draw Low Library, in order to get an appreciation of the effort put into it). Get her if you can. Although it may seem like there was a lot of writing involved, there really wasn't. These papers analyzed the art, but she didn't expect you to cite any sources or look at expert opinions: only to say what you thought.

Jan 2006

Take this class with Ms. White. Even if you never cared for art before she'll make an enthused participant out of you with the knowledge, enthusiasm, and grace she brings when teaching the class. She is *so* approachable too, always ready with a genuine smile. This was an evening class but it quickly became one that I looked forward to all the time. She helps convert even inane comments into something worthwhile. Just a great class overall, wished it was more than a semester long even when i hadnt, prior to this class, cared for art.

Jan 2006

I was not looking forward to taking Art Humanities, but Sarah Roland made the class a lot less painful than I had expected. I felt that the instructor did a great job of balancing between lecturing and facilitating discussion. Everyone was expected to participate in discussion, as participation was 1/3 of the grade, but she would react enthusiastically toward your comments even if they were just basic observations. She was good at connecting student comments, even if they were relatively simple, with larger themes. If you are an Art History major or someone else who is already knowledgeable/passionate about the topic, you might want a more difficult section, but considering that this class is an intro., I thought the level/workload was fair. Doing well in this section generally depends on willingness to participate in class, memorization of dates/works for the midterm/final, and effort/writing ability for the papers.

Jan 2006

At first I was afraid that I'd loathe the class because it seemed like Prof. Kaizen (or Bill) was a jaded grad student in his eighth year who really didn't give a hoot about teaching a bunch of kids basic Art History. And when the course ended I still believed that he didn't really care too much. But I got a heck of a lot out of the class and actually enjoyed Kaizen as an instructor. First off, the reading was really light. Really, really light - no more than 10 pages per class, if that. And he "tweaked" the syllabus - instead of doing everything chronologically we did Architecture, followed by Sculpture (both covered on the midterm) and then Painting (which made up the final). Teaching the class conceptually was a great idea and really helped me understand changes in Art History and recall different artistic mediums even when we went from Architecture to Painting. Since he's a seasoned modern art student, we cut a lot of the older works (especially during painting) and spent a lot of time on the more modern artists. For example, we skipped Michelangelo & Bruegel in the Painting section, but spent 2 days on Warhol and a day on Sherman (not commonly on the ArtHum syllabus). If a Music Hum prof tried pulling that and adding lots of Crumb and Schoenberg to the syllabus while deleting Beethoven I'd be pissed, but for ArtHum it worked well - probably because people had great comments and analyses on Warhol & Sherman and it was really Kaizen's area of expertise (most of his thesis is on Warhol. Second, he really demands formal analysis. He doesn't take people's fluffy answers that just beat around the bush. Instead he made us look at works in more depth and didn't accept mediocre answers. He isn't going to give you a glowing review - even an A paper won't be loaded with compliments - but he is very to the point and will help you in office hours and online. The papers are not exactly unique - one is a formal analysis either between St. Paul's chapel and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine or Alma Mater to the Thinker and the other one was a comparison of paintings at the Met (ranging from Monet to Picasso to Pollock & Johns). They were doable and it was clear from the beginning what he wanted. The exams were very fair. At the start of each class Kaizen handed out a slide list and on the bottom were 2-6 key terms. Those terms made up the IDs for the exam. Then we had some painting IDs, some formal slide analyses and and an essay that included the readings. The exams were not cumulative, and our final wound up being a takehome exam of 4 essays but only because of the Transit Strike. In the future I'd suspect that it would model the midterm. Overall, I'd recommend Kaizen as a good professor - I came out of the class learning a lot about Art History and actually APPRECIATING art, whereas other core classes made me really dislike the discipline. Kaizen won't be all cheery and nice and overaccessible and give you an A+ for minimal effort, but he will teach you a lot and I think he is better than many full-fledged professors who teach core classes.

Jan 2006

I disagree with the previous review. I thought Nadja was a good art hum teacher. Her lectures were clear and straight forward. She def cares about what she is teaching. She is not the type to be your best friend out of class, but she can be funny during lecture. The readings could be long but the reading question (singular) for almost each class asked for the basic theme of the reading. Therefore you can skim the reading and just get the main point. Bascially the midterm and final are memorizing the paintings and including key terms in the essays. Pretty easy grader for the three 2-3 pg essays. PRETTY EASY CLASS IF YOU ATTEND CLASSES.

Jan 2006

Generally a great class. Lectures were fairly straightforward though some were better than others. It is the only class I have ever had in which I actually enjoyed writing the papers, which allowed me to develop my thoughts. Albert Narath was extremely friendly and enthusiastic, which really helped the course be great. He's the type of instructor who is not so strict about deadlines or that you answer every one of the questions from the essay topic, but rather that you learn as much as possible. Overall, I gained an appreciation of art from this class that I had not had before. It was also not particularly difficult.

Jan 2006

Bill is very strict about attendance and lateness. However, his reading assignments were so light!!! You have to do them for the midterm and final but they are so short that you cannot complain. The material he chose was pretty interesting (a lot of Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman- Michelangelo got cut) but you better be ready to participate in class. If you don't volunteer he WILL call on you. If you give the wrong answer he might shut you down pretty harshly, but in the end everyone gets cut down everyonce in a while. Its shocking at first but you get over it. Overall, I didn't find him very painful.

Jan 2006

Awesome! Amy is just as great as the previous reviews have said she is. Discussions were amazing: she knows how to guide the discussion in a certain direction while still leaving room for people's individual opinions. We discussed really interesting aspects of the works, not just the typical stuff. At first I was intimidated by the prospect of readings and short responses (half a page) for each class -- and this definitely isnt one of those joke classes. But the readings were mostly interesting and the response papers were painless. The paper topics were interesting and totally doable. The midterm and final were not scary at all - you only need to know the century (not year) for the slide IDs, and the essays are actually fun to write! Take this class -- you will come away with a great appreciation for and understanding of art.

Jan 2006

First of all I would like to start by clearing up something which the previous reviewer had stated - Dr. Sheehan is NOT a "bad person", infact she is a Good person. I will clarify as well that her class is not an easy "A" and that you will have to work hard and do some real thinking about the subject. She was always available for each student who needed to speak with her about papers or anything regarding the class, and even sometimes things not regarding the class. She is a very dedicated person and even put her students first when she was very ill in the hospital. Her lectures are highly interactive and she encourages everyone to say whatever it is they think about a subject. She guides the class discussions and then allows the students to roam free in their interpretations and ideas about the art or atists the class is looking at. This format is highly conducive to learning as she encourages the students to use their recently aquired knowledge in challenging and interesting ways. Her class is far from boring and really ended up being the one class I was actually looking forward to every week. So, yes, the class is tough and if you take the time to try hard you will do well. And you will find that Dr. S is really an amazing person when you get to know her. You will come out of her class at the end of the semester happy to have had the class and you will be packed with tons of interesting and essential facts, and knowledge about art. A really good class and a great professor.

Jan 2006

A very good teacher who is unfortunately a harsh grader. If you are willing to enjoy your Art Hum class and would not mind getting a bit poor grade, Christina will be great for you. She loves art, works hard to make the class easy and enjoyable, is very approchable and willing to help, prepares study sheets for the exams, and is a nice person to know. I went in the class as art stupid and indeed learnt to appreciate art. She offers extra resources for art-savvies so no one can regret taking this class in terms of how much they learn. But that's one side of the coin. Though Christina always say that how much you learn in the course decides your grade rather than your essay grades, don't count on that. Even if you attend all class actively, do well on the exams, and work hard on the papers, your course grade will be the plain average of harsh grades you receive throughout the semester. Be prepared to get one-third or two-thirds of a letter grade less than what you belive you should have gotten at the least. In other words, of your class participation, exams, and essay grades, the lowest will be your course grade. Still, there are lots of harsh graders and bad teachers in the Art Hum dept., and Christina is definitely better than most of them since she teaches well at the least. You should not try switching out of this section if you are in since probability is high that you will get someone worse.

Dec 2005

This was one of the most plesant classes I hvae ever taken. She was a spectacular guide through art hum. Not only did she teach the material in a way that involved the entire class and forced people to be interested but she was always available for more in depth discussion or just general help. I truly enjoyed this class, probably my favorite class at Columbia. IF you got Bugbee then you are incredibly lucky.

Dec 2005

At first I was afraid of Kaizen. He is a well-seasoned grad student in the Art History department (he's been there somewhere between 6-8 years), told us that he was defending his dissertation really soon, and I had the first impression that he was just going to be one of those "I hate teaching this because I have to and I don't care about this class at all." Having had my fair share of apathetic grad students in Core classes, I didn't expect much. However, Kaizen used his past teaching experience and knowledge to actually make the class palatable. Sure, he wasn't super enthusiastic about papers (like us writing about St John the Divine vs. St Paul's chapel), and the readings were much less than any other Art Hum section (which I really didn't mind), but he actually was really really interesting. Instead of having a chronological mish-mosh of artistic works, we did architecture, then sculpture, then painting. He also tailored the syllabus to his areas of expertise (modern painting). We skipped artists like Bruegel and Rembrandt but spent a lot of time on Picasso, Pollock, Warhol & Sherman. I think this was good because people in the class were more insightful about the modern works. I think that the class was good - definitely the best Core class I took and I had NO art history background. Kaizen may not be the most approachable person (though he will meet with you outside of class) nor come accross as the most enthusiastic but the class was good, he taught the material well, and it was (surprisingly) very interesting. I'd recommend him in an instant.

Dec 2005

Anna is very nice. Her goal for the class is to give us a vocabulary to talk about art and an overall sense of art litteracy so that we can enjoy and benefit from trips to museums. She becomes visibily excited when people say semi-intelligent things in class, but she also questions comments that are totally off track. Her explanations of some theoretical concepts are a little verbose and unclear, and it can be difficult to know exactly what she thinks is important about certain pieces or readings. When studying for the final, I realized I should have taken much more detailed notes because she does expect you to know the significance of every work discussed in class and how it relates to the readings (which are short).

Dec 2005

After taking this class which could have been quite interesting, I am left with a bad taste in my mouth. Dr. Sheehan was a decent lecturer and once she started to come down off her power trip and became less domineering in class, discussions picked up. This was supposed to be a core class and not a difficult one at that. Her assignments, which seem very innocent at only 2pgs each, ask questions which need 20 pages to answer. Then after spending hours trimming my essay back, I get notes on it asking to elaborate in several spots. Good luck getting a decent grade in this potential GPA nukebomb.

Dec 2005

She is certainly a nice woman but unfortunately not a great teacher. She really tried to lead the discussion but sometimes it just wasn't working. I literally learned nothing from those class discussions - all I know now is from the readings that were rather lengthy and boring at times. In order to do good in class you have to do the readings cause she likes when you bring up the right points and it also gets you noticed since class participation is 20% of the grade. Two papers require a visit to the Met and Moma and have to be 5-7 pages. Not bad but again it is hard to understand exactly what she wants to see in those papers. Another thing is that you really can't miss a class because you never know which works she will discuss and which ones she will drop. If you can't get anyone else go with Di Palma but if you have a choice do yourself a favor and avoid her.

Dec 2005

To be fair to Dr. Bentz, I'll admit that her lectures were very informative. She definitely knew what she was talking about and I came away from this class with a great deal of new knowledge. But while she can lecture well, Dr. Bentz cannot teach a college class effectively at all. Never in my time at Columbia have I met a professor as inflexible or as condescending as she was. She would not extend deadlines on papers for any reason, even if a student had a perfectly legitimate case. On one paper, which required viewing and analyzing a statue in the Columbia neighborhood, she refused to grant a two-day extension of the due date even though it rained for 8 consecutive days in the week before the due date. She even responded by saying something to the effective of, "Would I move the final exam if there was snow?" Last I checked, we didn't have to sit outside for the final exam now, did we? I did get the paper in on time, but only after getting drenched while taking notes in the rain. And that's only the beginning of the troubles. At the start of the class, she said that she would scatter a few reading quizzes throughout the semester to ensure the class was keeping up with the reading. "A few" reading quizzes turned out to be about 11 or 12, or almost one every other class. These quizzes were stupid, infuriating, and totally unnecessary. They also did not improve the percentage of students doing the reading--every day before class there was a quick "What do I need to know for the quiz?" conversation among students. The rest of the class, other than the lectures, wasn't much better. She constantly reminds students on paper assignments about the importance of editing and topic sentences, as if she were teaching a middle or high school class. The midterm and final were not very hard, but she expects you to know and give examples for seemingly insignificant terms that she barely even talks about in class. Sometimes I got the impression that she wanted the students to be walking, talking art dictionaries. The bottom line: avoid this section at all costs unless you are a prospective art history major who's willing to be serious about the class and can absorb the incessant annoyances of the quizzes and paper assignments. I gave serious thought to transferring from this class at the start, and looking back I realize I probably should have acted on that thought.

Dec 2005

An overall good survey of Western art (and of course a necessary requirement for College students). Deborah's teaching style is not didactic, which is appropriate for a class such as art appreciation. She allowed us to engage in discussion without poking holes in anybody's argument -- that she usually left up to other students. The workload was minimal, thus allowing us to appreciate rather than memorize art, though the midterm and final required some memorization. I would venture a guess that this art hum section was one of the easiest, so take it with Deborah at any chance. Unless, of course, you would rather have a dogmatic nutcase teach you.

Dec 2005

Michelle is a by-the-book Art Hum instructor. Class discussions were stimulating and she was very kind and a moderate grader.

Dec 2005

I really disliked this class and I think it was Rottner's fault. WE had a ton of reading for each class and no one could ever figure out why it was relevant or what we were supposed to get out of it. In addition, she gave reading response qs everyday so we basically had a quiz each class and you really have to be there. Her exams were random, graded harshly, and she was unhelpful outside of class. If you can, avoid taking Rottner for Art HUm

Dec 2005

I am writing the review now, before finals, so that my grade does not affect my feelings towards Amy. She is the best teacher I have EVER had. In college, high school, middle school, my house. She is absolutely phenomenal. Take any class you can with her. For Art Hum, email her and ask her which section she is teaching. It is worth it. Give this lady a gold star.

Dec 2005

Good instructor. Always required the participation of everyone in the class but was never intimidating about it. Had an attendance policy like every other instructor, and had assigned reading, which wasn't too long, for every class. Graded a little bit harder than I expected but I don't think many people got below a B. I would recommend him.

Nov 2005

Michelle is sweet and new at teaching, she pretty much sticks to the art hum syllabus which can be illuminating at times. She is a fair grader and really appreciates participation- she has a tendency to laugh at her own jokes ;)

Nov 2005

Ethan is a very cool, chill guy. He's understanding about late papers or absences if there are personal issues/problems. He's laid-back, and has a sense of humor about the topic and curriculum.

Sep 2005

Teresa is a good teacher. She makes the material very interesting and brings a lot of unique observations to the class. She does a fairly good job of leading class discussion (sometimes it takes herculean effort just to draw the most banal observations out of students.) If you want to make the class really interesting, you are going to have to come out of your shell and help spur on discussion of the works.

Aug 2005

Switzer has a penchant for inciting audience--you--participation. I suppose that comes with the territory, but, I became completely turned-off by the gratuitous BS that spewed from my peers' mouths. If you are looking for a historical component to Art History, Switzer's classroom is not the place to find it. If you enjoy excercising your BS fetish, sign right up. Here's my simple advice: This course is a crapshoot, try your luck elsewhere.

Aug 2005

Certain Professors at Columbia should sit in on Melissa's class and observe the correct way to teach a class. Melissa's lectures were always interesting to listen to. In addition, she was considerate and open-minded towards other students' intrepretations of the artworks. She allowed the class to submit drafts of the papers ahead of time, and graciously proof read them for us. Her midterm and final exams are based on her review sessions. There are no trick questions, or ambigous essay questions: what you see with Melissa is what you get. And what you're getting is a wonderful instructor.

Jul 2005

A very desirable way to get through Art Hum. Teresa is nice, smart, and interested in teaching the class. She doesn't emphasize rote memorization too much, but if you pay attention you'll definitely get a lot out of the class. Grading was very fair and well-explained. I can't think of a better teacher for the class.

Jul 2005

Professor Bahrani initially comes off as really strict and a tough grader. Don't let that fool you. She's great. I really learned so much about art and how to look at art (although there was a lot of BS to deal with from kiss-up students). Overall, Professor Bahrani is an excellent teacher. And if its ever a nice day outside, she usually let us out early--an added bonus. If you get into this class, don't even think of dropping it!

Jul 2005

Being my first art history course, I did not know what to expect, but I was pleasantly surprised. Her teaching style is quite direct and she offers a lot of opportunities to engage the class in various debates and discussions. I did not get bored at all - given that it was an evening section that cut through dinner - and learned a great deal during this summer course. She is very thorough in her explanations and knows a great deal about the subject. The lectures are well organized and setup in a systematic fashion. No time was wasted, other than technology issues, and even for that there were backup plans in place. Highly recommend.

Jul 2005

Amy is great!! By far the best core instructor I've had. She's knowledgeable and articulate, and incredibly approachable. I know it sounds cheesy but she really is sooooo nice. She respects everyone's opinion and can often transform mundane comments into enlightening ideas. As the previous reviewer pointed out, the comparative slides that she showed really successfully shed light on the major artists on the syllabus while also whetting our interest in art history in general. A very pleasant experience.

Jun 2005

An excellent teacher! She is clear, concise, considerate, and extremely helpful. What more could you possibly ask for?!

Jun 2005

I don't like 9am classes. I don't like memorizing things. I'm pretty sure that I may not even like art all that much. But I really enjoyed this class. Casagrande's teaching style is ideal for ArtHum---she works very hard not to be boring, not to lecture for extended periods of time, and tries to engage the class. Even though the class is mostly spent in the dark, I never fell asleep (a huge achievement for me). She may initially seem a bit crazy and demanding (an email before the semester began announcing presentations on the second day of class was a bit frightening), but she grows on you very quickly. While her accent may take some getting used to, you soon come to expect certain not-quite-English phrases, and she doesn't take herself or her mistakes too seriously. The courseload is a bit more demanding than what seems to be the norm in ArtHum, but the reading is always pretty helpful, and you definitely don't have to do all of it. It's useful for the three papers, which are all interesting and open-ended, but you won't be tested on it. She really makes you take advantage of the NYC resources and is especially good at helping you tie very different artistic pieces and ideas together. Overall, I'd say that RCK puts a lot of work into this class, and you'll probably get a lot out of it. You can't get much better than this.

Jun 2005

Consider yourself very lucky if you get Heidi for Art Hum. She is engaging, funny, and very committed to the class. Her lectures were extremely well-prepared and very interesting. She is open to what students have to say and willing to take their views into account. If you notice something about a piece that she hadn't thought of, she'll admit that, instead of just brushing you off. I thought the grading was very fair. She does look for specific things on the midterm and final, but she isn't a fanatic about things like dates (you have to be within a 5 year range) and spelling. In order to do well on the papers, you will need to come up with an argument about the assigned painting or sculpture or piece of architecture, instead of just describing what you're looking at. If you can do that, then you'll be fine. Also, Heidi graciously offers to read one draft over the course of the semester, and returns them with tons of helpful comments.

May 2005

Great class, a little difficult to take in the evening but, Ms. White did a good job with the class. There seemed to be too many slides to go over as well. The trip to the MET was fine, Ms. White does seem knowledgable about the work though.

May 2005

This class is just amazing period. I was very concerned about having to take an art class because I really had no clue about anything related to art and wasnt all that interested in learning about it. But Miss White is a great teacher that really enjoys what shes talking. I mean could you ask for anything else... She even brings food to class for you. By the end of the class you feel like youve just been hit by a truck of art and without even realizing it youve learned a whole lot. Her papers are hard sometimes but as long as you say something smart you should be fine. In short you couldnt have a better art hum professor.

May 2005

Melissa is a great teacher!!! I was so lucky to be in her section. She's so nice because she revised our essays before giving them in and answered our many questions during office hours. There was a day in which the projector stopped functioning and we didn't make up the class because she knew that would be more material for us to study from. We didn't get to do Monet, Warhol, or Wright, but that was okay. I learned so much from that one class even though we didn't cover three units. Her exams are easy and very fair. She is one of the best art hum teachers out there, so if you get her, KEEP HER!

May 2005

Sara is pretty damn amazing. She makes the art come alive in the classroom and really challenges students to perceive art through their own unique lens (that sentence came write out of a paper i wrote for her class). The class is most definitely doable and all you have to do is visit a couple of museums so you can write 3 papers, and then study, study, study for the final which is pure memorization (and actually kinda difficult, b/c u have to know EVERY SINGLE PAINTING/SCULPTURE shown in class. Overall though, art hum was a great experience with Sara and you'd be very lucky to have her as your professor.

May 2005

Prof. Law can be a bit dull at times, but she is knowledgeable about the artworks discussed, and she is committed to imparting that knowledge to her students. Her assignments leave a lot of room for creativity and allow students a chance to explore arts in the city, ranging from sketches of local architecture to reviews of art exhibits in NYC museums. She is fairly understanding about tardiness and absences and is accessible for help or clarification of assignments. Though she does try to encourage class discussion, she often poses questions that are too open-ended to easily facilitate discussion or counters students' remarks to the point of killing any ensuing discussion. The readings aren't necessary for participation, but they certainly help. All in all, she is a sweet lady and a good teacher and while the class won't inspire you to become an art major, you will definitely have a solid knowledge of the works on the art hum syllabus.

May 2005

Despite the other reviewer's sentiments, I found Dr. Bentz pleasant, engaging, and kind. Any art history class will mainly be slides and analysis, which is exactly what this class was. She would lecture and then ask and take questions from the class about the topic. We did have reading quizzes almost every class, but if you do the reading, then you should pretty much burn through these, she's not trying to trick the students with her questions. Yes, the reading quizzes did get a little annoying, but I have friends in other Art Hum sections who didn't do a lick of reading, which is the trap Dr. Bentz is hoping to avoid. I generally thought the readings were interesting anyway. As far as the papers and tests, they were generally pretty easy as long as you're willing to memorize dates (standard for any section and she gives you 5 years on either side of the date), slides, terms, and go over your notes. There were three papers and they were 2-4 pages. The first paper was about architecture, the subject being Grant's Tomb, the second paper on sculpture was a choice of 5 statues in the parks around Columbia, and the final paper was any painting from the Renaissance until 1800ish. The point of this class is to give you an appreciation for art and be somewhat intelligent when looking at, studying, or talking about art in the future. After taking this class, that goals were more than achieved. If you're looking for a complete pushover grad student for this class, don't take this section, but if you're looking for an engaging class that you might have to put a bit more work into, take this.

May 2005

Susanna was GREAT! She was knowledgable about all the art we covered in class, but most importantly, she tried to make our lessons interesting. All classes were discussion-based, and surprisingly, we talked more than she did most days! She is also very chill interms of extensions and the like. She is a grad-student and knows that most of us take this course because we have to so she teaches it that way. She doesn't expect you to have any prior knowledge!

May 2005

I think professor Applegate is the best. She taught me how to really engage with and read a piece of art, and for that I'm very thankful. I chose art hum section number unlucky 13 out of a morbid feeling of hate for the core, but thank god I did. This woman restored my faith in the core curriculum. Heidi's class was always engaging, and her willingness to confront the pieces critically (the Parthenon is so bootleg and anyone who says different is a grade grubber!) makes the course refreshing. She's also quite funny.

Apr 2005

Amy Powell is an amazing professor. Unlike many professors at Columbia, Amy is really good at facilitating discussion and keeping things moving, while always respecting diverse opinions. I felt her strongest point was keeping the dialogue going-I never fell asleep in her class (and I expected art hum to be pretty boring) because I was always engaged in the class discussion...But not because I was one of three talking. She really does a good job of getting a lot of different people to talk, while adding her own intelligent input. She also brings a lot outside of the curriculum to the course, not in a distracting way, but in a way that enhances the major artworks examined. She'll bring in images that give insight into the works we are studying--for example, comparing Pollock's Autumn Rhthym with Warhol's oxidized bronze piss painting. Her insights are always interesting and eloquently stated.

Mar 2005

Professor Bentz is the kind of teacher who, 2 years out of grad school, signs her emails and refers to herself as "dr. bentz". She is one of the most anal retentive and condescending people I have ever met - let alone been "taught by". She teaches the class as though it we were in middle school -- for example on every essay assignment, she makes sure to remind us about the importance of "editing" and the ever important "topic sentences". I could not imagine a worse art hum experience. And for the papers be prepare to write about ...Grant's tomb, and a big bronze statue of Joan of Arc - no way would this professor trust her students to pick out pieces of art that they found meaningful and or interesting to write about. She has butchered this class and everything i assume it stands for. Prepare for weekly reading comprehension quizzes and memorizing lots and lots of dates and specific definitions of terms...that's right, it's flashcard time. What an utter waste of time.

Jan 2005

The reviews I've read here are way off base; Amity is a great teacher--by far my best in the Fall semester. First off, she is a kind grader. She seems to understand how difficult it is to survey the entire history of western art in 16 weeks. Show some honest thought in your work and you'll be happy with your grade. Proof read carefully--her only pet peeve is careless writing. The 'lectures' were fun and easy to get involved in. Not overdone with academic language as I hear most W1121 classes are. Even on my groggiest days she seemed to rope me in. My only complaints have to do with the room we were in and the department's structure of the class. The room had bizarre acoustics--it swallowed voices whole. This is probably why these students believe she was shy. If you're on 6th floor Shermerhornit be sure to sit up front and you'll hear everything but the irrelevant anecdotes being told towards the back. The structure annoyed me because it forced me to listen to inane comments from other students. Discussion is a large part of the class, and is only as good as its make-up. This seems to be the case for every Art Hum class, so beat the BS'ers to the punch and try to learn something. If you simply want to learn things by rote, audit didactic lectures, and generally be told what to think and then be tested on what you've been told then Amity might not be the best choice for you. On the other hand, if you want to be challenged with sharp questions, aren't afraid of thinking for yourself, and want to gain some understanding from this mad rush through several thousand years of western art then she's a great choice.

Jan 2005

This turned into my favorite class of the semester. Although I had friends taking this class with other professors and doing next to no work, I enjoyed writing all of the papers and preparing for both of the exams. But is you are looking for an easy A, keep looking. Tomoko expects and rewards class participation, and will give a poorly written paper the grade that it deserves. Our first papers were graded pretty harshly (I got a B+ on the paper, which included a very detailed sketch of the building I was writing about) and she explained that she had done this to keep us working harder. This is a survey course, so you move rather quickly from antiquity to the Renaissance right through to Pollock. If nothing else, I left this class certain that I now want to take at least one more art history class to fill in the gaps (i.e., Michelangelo's paintings are not covered - only sculpture).

Jan 2005

If you got Dr. Walker, you should be very happy. Honestly, when she first introduced herself as "Dr. Alicia Walker, PhD from Harvard" we all cringed a little bit. But after she loosened up as the semester progressed, she turned out to be an amazingly outgoing and engaging lecturer. She will challenge you but is fair, and is goes out of her way to make herself available outside of class. She gives great lectures and clearly knows her stuff... this isn't a fall-asleep section. She also isn't a professor that will make you memorize insane amounts of dates & slides -- in her own words, she aims to teach you how to look at and appreciate art, regardless of whether you can put a date to it. To that end, she does extremely well.

Jan 2005

Page is a great teacher. Although class is somewhat reminiscent of high school, I came out having learned a lot about art. She is very accomadating, and knowledgable. I would definitely recommend her for fulfilling the requirement.

Jan 2005

In my opinion, an inept instructor - mumbles, shy, doesn't know that much. Long periods of silence, does not facilitate discussion or seem very interested in teaching. Class consisted of long periods of akward silences. Switch out!!!

Jan 2005

Irina is great. She is a fantastic teacher, never dull and always willing to hear comments from the class (even if they were a little dumb.) She is incredibly understanding about almost everything and rarely has a problem with handing in assignments a few days late if you let her know. She is very intelligent and well-spoken. I left every class feeling really good about what I just learned and because of her great teaching style I really remembered everything she said - which means studying for her very fair midterm and final won't be difficult. Overall, Irina will be a great Art Hum teacher and definitely stick with her.

Jan 2005

It's obvious that she is very knowledgeable, but she does not do a good job of leading discussions. Rather, each lecture is just a series of slides and for each slide she just simply lets the class stare and grope for something to say. While this got slightly better with time as we all figured some of the obvious stuff to comment about, most discussion contributions are long rambly non-coherent shot-in-the-dark-type comments made by students who obviously have had previous exposure to the visuals arts. For the rest of us, it's mostly a lot of guesswork until dipalma finally makes her point(s). I don't feel that she ever really gave us the tools to analyze art in a less fuzzy way. Which made it absolutely frustrating where you can write the longest responses to an identification of a slide on her tests but it may still not be good enough. Overall with grades, I was not satisfied, given the workload and amount of material we had to know, coupled with the fact that she never really covers everything we need to know in class for the exam. There will always be that one point or two that you will have missed. so yea, like the previous reviewer, don't expect an easy A, unless you participate your ass off AND hit every nail.

Jan 2005

This was Van Liefferinge's first attempt at teaching Art Hum, and I think he did a great job. He is a grad student with an interest in medieval architecture, but he is familiar with all of the topics covered. What I enjoyed most was the comparisons he made between artwork across time. He is very friendly (meets individually with everyone), open-minded and never tries to force an opinion. He encourages discussion (difficult to do at 9am!), though sometimes I had trouble understanding his questions (he is from Belgium) - but maybe that was because I was tired. The midterm is one short paper comparing two paintings at the Met ("You can write anything, but it just has to make sense," he said), and the final was very straightforward with not too many IDs. As Stefaan said, he just wanted us to remember that these 11 topics were important to art history, and I think that's just about all one can really do with such an overly ambitious course. Unless you want a hardcore ArtHum experience, you couldn't ask for a better section.

Jan 2005

This is an easy section. There is barely any reading and we had fewer slides on our midterm and final than other sections I've heard about. Unfortunately, you probably won't learn much unless you go in knowing nothing about art. Dr. Pinson is nice but he isn't the most engaging speaker and seems kind of shy or intimidated. He definitely didn't have the best material to work with but class discussions were rather painful--I would have preferred silence to some of the idiotic comments he let slide by. Art Hum may just be a flawed class but Dr. Pinson did little to improve it (though to his credit, he definitely tried.)

Jan 2005

Nassim was one of my favorite teachers. She is extremely knowledgeable and passionate about the material, and her lectures were always very informative. She also allowed a lot of time for class discussion/questions and never seemed fazed when students kept butting in with grandiose comments. She wants her students to engage in the material, but doesn't expect revolutionary insights into art history. She is also not interested in forcing people to "like" certain pieces of art, but rather wants us to understand why these pieces are important. Nassim seems to assign more work than most art hum. teachers, but this can work to your advantage because everything is weighted less severely. She is also very willing to help students, and if you exert a decent amount of effort and follow her advice, the grading is very generous.

Jan 2005

Heidi is an excellent teacher, she is very friendly and approachable. Art Hum has easily been my favorite class at CC so far, and I'm positive it's because of her. She grades very easily, I found, because I really had no idea what to write about for most papers and with a little thinking and a "stretch analysis" of the topic, she generally rewarded her students. If you get Heidi for Art Hum, count your lucky stars!

Jan 2005

Melissa was a great teacher. She really cared about the classes understanding of the art, and really wanted everybody to do well. As said before, it was an easy class, BUT you learn a lot. I was never really interested in art but I came out of this class really knowledgable and enjoyed it! Melissa is willing to read essays before they are due, and you can even e-mail her the night before with PART of your essay and she will e-mail you or call you to give you some help. It was truly amazing how much she cared. If you end up with Melissa Bugbee for art hum consider yourself lucky, its not difficult and you will learn a lot.

Jan 2005

Stephen Pinson's course was really great. At first, it took a bit of time (almost the entire semester!) for the people in the class to warm up with each other and Dr. Pinson, but I felt that in the end, I learned as much about art as one could in a 13 week course that attempts to cover mainly 600 years of art. Pinson is a bit shy and he makes a fairly big deal out of not doing the reading (it's really obvious to tell when people haven't done the reading, and there's not really that much to do). He also doesn't like it when people don't participate, which can be frustrating for those who don't know how to really comment on art. But, if you stick to the reading and follow the material in class, you'll realize that Pinson is an insanely knowledgeable professor who has a knack for teaching art. I'd definitely recommend his class.

Jan 2005

Heidi was a good art hum teacher. She always came prepared, and was always excited about the material. Heidi was knowledgeable and made sure to include lots of class interaction. Having checked other sections before picking her, I would characterize her as being one of the better (if not one of the best) choices for Art Hum.

Jan 2005

Melissa is really a good teacher. She is very knowledgeable, friendly and understanding. I think as long as you go to class and take some notes or just rememeber what was said about the paintings in class, the midterm and final are not difficult at all. In my class, the readings weren't really necessary only one towards the end about Goya or something but maybe she'll teach differently next time so pay attention to see if you really need to do the Art Hum. reader readings. She does not pick on you in class so you don't have to worry about that, but just make sure you look attentive and so you can get some kind of participation credit say something once in a while no matter what is about the painting, people say the most obvious and redundant things restated so just say something. I think I would consider her a fairly easy teacher but you actually learn things as opposed to other easy teachers. I definitely recommend her. (I am not particularly interested in art so you know I am not biased towards this class being fun or anything.)

Jan 2005

Kristin is a competent art humanities teacher but her speciality is Russian 20th century art which means that she is not always that knowledgable about the material in art hum. She is good at explaining the art but sometimes gets nervous and freezes up, not knowing what to say. She has a good sense of humour and keeps most of the students awake, which is hard to do in any class where the lights are low.

Jan 2005

Susanna is an adequate Art Hum instructor. She is knowledgable about art history in general, particularly the later artists covered, and always came to class prepared. Class time itself ranged from mildly interesting to excruciatingly boring, with excruciatingly boring being the most likely. Often, we did not see more than a few slides per class period, and she frequently allowed class discussion to get waaaaaay off-topic.

Jan 2005

Heidi did a great job, and I think she is only going to improve her methods. She is a solid, nice, passionate teacher who understands the faults of the core but steers students towards the best understanding they can achieve. Our class warmed up to her after just a few classes, and I think it turned out just fine. Be glad you have Heidi. She's supercute.

Jan 2005

Sancho is highly competent. She knows her stuff and speaks and teaches well. You end up covering a lot less than what the syllabus says, but you will learn a lot nonetheless. The assigned readings are sometimes long and largely irrelevant, but there aren't many and you can get away with just skimming them. Class discussion can be boring at times (analyzing paintings for too long...it's art hum) but is usually interesting. Grading is quite reasonable. A good teacher overall that I recommend.

Jan 2005

Great art hum teacher! He may be boring, but he is an easy, easy grader. Also, he doesn't bother with any extra artists, so even better. Despite how easy the course was, I also really developed an appreciation for art and I think it was because of Killian's laid back approach to the subject. If you get him, even if you're bored the first few classes, take him. Great teacher.

Dec 2004

Prof. Pinson is a great Art Hum instructor. He sticks to a few main themes throughout the semester so by the end you really have a good feel for how the artists all relate to each other. Class discussions sometimes were dominated by a few talkative people, but pinson does his best to get everyone to contribute. He is also a very sweet guy, willing to help with papers and letting class out early.

Dec 2004

Simply amazing...nothing else to describe this class and this professor. Easily, the best and most refreshing class I've taken at Columbia.

Dec 2004

Yeah, she's definitely pretty good; I actually liked this class ahelluva lot. She's able to make the discussion pretty interesting, even when everyone stares blankly at the slide like stunned cattle. You're definitely gonna have to work if you want to get an A, but I really found it worth it, and even enjoyed writing the three papers. Also, the tours she took us on at the met were really interesting. Still, you are going to be putting a fair amount of time into art hum if you want a good grade.

Dec 2004

Heidi is fun and helpful and seems to have a strong knowledge of what was covered, even with it being the first time she taught ArtHum. She grades a little harsher than I thought was necessary, but she is still really nice and gives candy sometimes!

Nov 2004

This was honestly the easiest class I have ever taken. Like evry one else in Art Hum, I was simly hoping to learn a little bit about Art HIstory and how it all fit together, write a few papers, and get one step closer to finishing up the Core. Lindsey Koval was a pleasant surprise. She has the energy and enthusiasm of an undergraduate, and, not once, in a dark classroom at 7 o'clock at night did I fall asleep or get even close to falling asleep. Her passion and understanding of art and art history makes the class interesting, plus, she makes allusions to pop-culture that are a welcome break from dark brrooding Rembrandts. I have to say, that other than two papers a mid term and a final, I never thought about this class until I was sitting looking at slides. There is absolutely no outside reading, though she will recommend passages and texts to you if you are interested. Her only drawback is that she can seem a bit flakey, canceling class at the last minute. It is obvious that this class is not her first priority, but why should it be? (Plus, a cancelled class is a must need break / celebration) I would very much stress getting Lindsey Koval for a prof. She is interesting and very understanding and willing to help, extend deadlines. Furthermore, just because she talks quickly and has obviously read the latest edition of US Weekly does not mean she is stupid. She knows each piece of Art quite well, especially the sculpture, and is able to tie them together into one fluid course.

Nov 2004

Simply AMAZING! Seriously, truuuuuust me... you will love her class!

Nov 2004

AMAZING. first of all - she doesn't teach art hum as a survey course - so don't worry about having to make the stacks of 200 flashcards that all your friends will. she teaches art hum as an in-depth discussion of several pieces (+/- 20: she spent two and half weeks discussing the coliseum) so if you want to be able to name every piece in the met, she isn't for you, but if you want to be able to really think carefully and speak intelligently about several masterpieces of art, then dawn's your prof. i didn't skip art hum once the entire semester - she's that good. very little bullshit, fair grader, interesting and very smart, extremely knowledgable. does look for comments in class.

Nov 2004

Prof Pinson is great. He knows the core is BS and does his best to cram like 50 million years of art into the semester without being overwhelming. Discussions are entertaining b/c he won't hesistate to laugh at people that give bs responses (like someone saying cherubin are allusions to flying baby jesuses). You don't need to do the reading, but if you skim it, you can find a few good comments to make to up your participation grade.

Sep 2004

Stephanie Shwarz is the one teacher that convinced me to major in Art History. Her lectures are clear, articulate, and thoughtful. She makes a serious and sensitive attempt explaining how our responses to artwork can be utilized by the particular complex language used in this discipline, all the while declaring careful note of the limits of verbal expression for art. The above reviewers have complained that she's hazy and articulate, but how far should we take this? These accusations are eliminated when one takes advantage of her openness for after class hours. She'll hold your hand and stick with you if you show her you're a serious student, just like any good teacher.

Sep 2004

One of my favorite classes at Columbia. He was engaging, well spoken, and helped us learn about and enjoy an amazing collection of works. Although some previous reviewers have shelled him for being condescending in class, I found his conduct to be quite the opposite. For example, there was one student in my class who was consistently (even agressively) wrong, and yet had a penchant for hearing his own voice. Instead of hanging him out to dry, Mr. Onafuwa corrected this student and others as gently as he could. Whereas I might have snapped at this guy, Yemi was always patient. Another aspect of his teaching for which he has been wrongly harangued is a heavy workload and unnecessary amount of reading. Though the reading is suggested, one was never evaluated on having done it. Class discussion was based on the slides in front of us, the professor's presentation, and any additional outside input from students (usually not from the reading). Also, seeing as the only other grades in class were a participation, midterm, and final, there was no way I can possibly find a way to complain about the workload. If you come in ready to learn and to participate, having spent at least a little time with the works before class, this will be a great class for you. My class seems to have had a much more enjoyable time with Mr. Onafuwa than some of the previous ones. All other things being equal, I feel like he has gone from a knowledgeable but unaproachable professor to one of the best instructors you could hope to land in this course. P.S. Never refer to Picasso simply as "Pablo" in class. People like you deserve to be made fun of.

Sep 2004

She's by far the worst professor I've ever had in my life. The little interest I might have had on ART died because of her. Her lectures are extremely boring and she does NOT teach anything. She picks favorites from the beginning and grades accordingly. BETTER LUCK ELSEWHERE!

Sep 2004

I loved Zee. I am a chemistry major and thought I would never have an interest in art, but after her class I decided to become an Art History minor because I was so confident and excited by her class. She is definitely demanding, but that is only because everyone expects Art Hum to be simple... It is definitely possible to well in her class - you just need to do the work & do it well. If you are considering a major/minor/anything in Art History but have no background in the subject or even if you do, Zee is definitely your woman. She will prepare you to have opinions about art & feel confident to discuss anything (even modern art if you thought you'd never have a clue). I was completely prepared when I took my first 3000 level Art History class & had even done some of the readings already!

Aug 2004

This man is AMAZING! He is so passionate and knowledgeable about the topics covered that it makes you excited. (I know it sounds dorky, but it's true.) He makes all these short films to further illustrate his points, extremely talented in digital media, and is also a fair grader. Unfortunately, he won't be teaching next year because he's pursuing a Masters and just got a grant (I think), but if he comes back and you get him, don't drop the class!

Aug 2004

I agree with the other reviewers. Zee is an excellent teacher and very nice and i learned a ton, but she is a VERY tough grader (like the other reviewer said, she doesn't seem to realize that a B is a terrible grade!!!). The workload isn't bad at all, but her grading is extremely frustrating -- everyone always says how easy art hum is, so i was especially annoyed when i got a B+ and it pulled down my average for the semester by a lot. All in all, unless you are an excellent bullsh*tter (which I think you have to be at least somewhat good at to do well in art hum), then be prepared for your gpa to fall a bit (but you will learn a great deal, though!)

Aug 2004

He is a great teacher. He makes Art Hum a GREAT experience. He is a fair to easy grader. He tests are long but very doable and fair. He is fun and enthusiastic although he can get cross every once in a while. He clearly enjoys teaching and you feel as though he truly cares about his students. I recommend him 100%. I was thinking of trying to switch out of his class on the first day when I walked in because I had been turned off by some unkind and harsh reviews, but I decided to stay and I am superbly happy that I did.

Jul 2004

I would definately skip this professor if possible. In my opinion, He is basically a snob who looks down on all of his students. He gets great joy out of trying to make you feel stupid. Even if you go to all of the classes and study a lot, you will not do well unless you have an art background. He will tell you that the tests will be a reflection of classwork... its a lie. He will find some obscure detail you merely brushed over and then have you write an essay on it. Find a kinder way to complete this requirement if at all possible!

Jul 2004

I loved this class! Sara was amazing & very open once I showed interest in the material. This class changed the way I looked at art & now I'm seriously contemplating in changing my major. Her exams are really hard, but at the end, it will all be worth it!

Jul 2004

True, Zee will teach you about art. Her lectures are interesting and intense (or at least they seemed a little intense for 9 am). She is an in-your-face, participation-requiring art neo-enthusiast who will definitey require you to go beyond standard arthum time commitment. If you're taking arthum because you genuinely want to be challenged and learn, then take Zee. However, If you want to learn what everyone else learns and get out with a decent grade, then get away. To her you did "well" on a test if you received a B-...I don't think there are too many of us out there who are satisfied with B-'s.

Jul 2004

dr. pinson is great !!! he knows his stuff but at the same time allows the students to analyze the pieces by themselves. sometimes this gets a bit long, but i've never managed to fall asleep in his class. he's a really nice and approachable guy who is very understanding. i handed in a paper late due to an extenuating reason and he didn't take points off. if you pay attention to class (and go everytime), you'll do well.... trust me. he doesn't test anything that isn't covered in class, nor does he rely heavily (or at all!) on the art hum readings. thank your lucky stars if you get dr. pinson... he's a nice guy who gives easy grades. if you haven't done well in class, then it's because you haven't payed attention to the slides.

Jul 2004

HORRIBLE! Diana is the worst teacher I've ever had at Columbia. She did not know how to teach the material to her students at all, even though she was clearly enthusiastic about it. The most painful class I've ever taken. The readings had nothing to do with anything. She gave lots of wrong information during the semester (for example, when she made reference to the 7 books of Moses--any mildly educated person knows there's only 5) and would ask questions to try to get us to think about the material and when no one would answer she'd respond "yeah, that's a pretty hard question. i dont really know the answer either." A total ditz and shouldnt be allowed to teach art hum.

Jul 2004

Ms. Kart was an amazing teacher. She sparked an interest in art history that I never knew I had. She made eveyrthing interesting and was totally open-minded to all of the students' opinions and ideas. Ms. Kart also was totally laid back and understanding.

Jun 2004

Zee is amazing. While she is a tough grader and expects a lot, you will in turn learn a lot. Class discussions are interesting and intense and paper topics arnt so bad. Overall a good class

Jun 2004

Christina is terrific, and even if this class were offered at 7am, you'd love showing up! She's a charming blend of easy going, knowledgeable and super-friendly. I think she may be moving onward and upward soon, so take her class while you still can. Christina is gonna be one of your favorite instructors at Columbia! Show up to class, participate, and jot down her insights--it'll pay off on the exams and the papers. Her grading is incredibly fair, and moreover, the class is genuinely interesting.

May 2004

A god among grad students. Passionate, open-minded, whip-smart, devoted to his students, sweetly geeky, funny as hell. Highlights: Christian stroking the "puppies" in a Breugel painting, Christian kneeling on the floor gnawing at the podium to illustrate a modern art exhibit involving a woman eating a huge slab of chocolate. Christian on surrealism: "So if every time I painted a picture of you I replaced your head with the head of a dog... or... not a dog... something more beautiful... than you already are..." Christian analyzing a Goya etching of a donkey: "Donkeys carry the implications of genetic questionability, and, well, they aren't very smart. I had to ride one when I was little... never mind." Seriously, though, the man is a fantastic teacher and will make a truly great professor. Let him loose and he'll teach you the history of Western philosophical and religious thought, all accurately and sensitively, while riffing through every work of art you've seen so far, and then some. Trail behind him at the Met or the Frick and learn to care more about the carving on nineteenth century furniture than you thought possible. Argue with him or with other students: he loves it. He's your dorky-but-cool older brother. Enjoy the ride.

May 2004

I have been at Columbia for 2 years and she is by far the best teacher I've had and she's only a grad student. I went into the class only because I had to and I didn't expect to get anything out of it but a grade. I got much much more. Through her own enthusiasm and bubbly nature, she really brought out the best in her students. I found myself developing a real interest in art and discussing things in class all the time. She's taking a sabbatical now but should she ever come back, you have to take her!

May 2004

Prof Delbanco is a less than exciting lecturer but she has impressive knowledge. The papers were difficult to write because it was so hard to know what she wanted you to write. Criticisms usually were about points you had failed to make, rather than incorrect points you had made. The paper length was only four pages, yet when after the second paper she sent an email with what she would've considered a complete answer to the questions, her concise answer came to six and a half pages.

May 2004

Ms. White is a really good teacher. She was very nice with the class, and her exams were pretty easy. She was rough on grading the essays but she gives a lot of feedback which helps. I didn't get a good grade in the class but I never looked at the artwork. So if you get into Ms. White's class, stay in it.

May 2004

Not only is Zee an awesome teacher, she's a great person too. She's enthusiastic, encouraging, and smart. From what I've heard about other professors, she might be a little tougher in terms of grading and work-load, but please don't let this detract you from taking her class. She's not a bitter grad student; in fact, she's often commented on how helpful teaching is to her studies. The class is inspiring and fun. As we filled out evaluations at the end of the term, I looked around and saw that everyone gave her the best marks possible!

May 2004

I cannot figure out the reviews below. Perhaps Onafuwa had a life changing experience, because his class was easy and fun. No papers, no reading. midterm, final that are simply ids and comparisons. he actually made art hum quite good. take him if you get a chance

May 2004

Two words: Goya & Goya. You will hear them often and always.

May 2004

Page is really sweet. This is a class that really favors the beginning-- upon starting, I couldn't have told you the difference between Bruegel and Bosch if my life depended on it. She is always ready to help you out and give you a hand. Show the least bit of effort, and you'll get rewarded for it. She's really cool about things-- like we had Jackson Pollack day (take a guess) and she took us out to dinner after field trips. Page's class is neither challenging nor particularly ground-breaking, but it's a fun, easy- going way to fulfil art hum.

May 2004

It took me a little while to figure out whether she was really nice or retarded, but after a while I realized she's smart and respectful of her students, which isn't something you find often in this class. It's also really dependent on who your fellow classmates are, so it took a little while to get used to her style and dealing with some of the stupid comments said in class. But seriously, she knows what she's talking about, gives positive feedback, makes the material interesting, and is totally personable. Two enthusiastic thumbs up.

May 2004

The class went by mostly painlessly, and I aborbed the relevant details about what images are on the upper walls of the parthenon, the structural lines that Raphael was thinking about when he painted, and some biographical information about Goya, and in the end, I did pretty well in the course. But, I left with a pretty bad taste in mouth. What it may come down to is a mere clash of personalities, but nonetheless, I thought I'd voice my opinion. I found Creagh to be an unfriendly, arrogant, and overall, quite unpersonable as an instructor. In a different setting, where the material itself is emphasized (ie, if we were meant to be learning ABOUT art, as opposed to learning about HOW to look at art) such arrogance and coldness would have gone by, for me, unnoticed, or at least would not have really changed my view on the course overall. But, in a class like ARt Hum, where the level is neccesarily basic and introductory, where the 'correct' and sublimely interesting answers to questions posed in class are things like; "because the columns go up and down," or, "she's pointing up, to god," or "his arm is longer than it should be", in a class like this, personality, a sense of humor, and friendliness on the whole, seem like crucial elements. Maybe it isn't fair to blame Creagh for her rudeness, and her generally frigid demeanor. She may very well have no interest at all in being an educator. She may hate teaching. She may hate dealing with undergraduates who don't know art history, and who don't know why it's important to know. Fair enough. But, this is a culpa review. So, I'm telling you; It's not about unfair grading, or boring lectures, or unfamilarity with the material... it's about charisma, and for me, this lady had very little.

Apr 2004

I have to say that I find these other reviews a mystery. I found Rebecca to be mean, snide, and extremely confusing. Her lectures were rambling, and she had seemingly know idea how to ask her students questions that would either provoke their thought or guide them in any useful direction. Her comments on papers were petty, and did little to point the student toward a better understanding of how to write about art. I finally dropped the class in frustration after realizing that despite taking meticulous class notes, I had literally no idea what would be on the midterm, or how to study, simply because Rebecca was so vague. And I had a wonderful experience with a different Art Hum teacher (Andrew Manson), so I know I don't just randomly hate Art Hum.

Apr 2004

Definitely one of the best Art Hum teachers. I registered for and then dropped two sections before lucking out on Andrew. Very good lecturer, extremely nice, loves the subject matter, organized, clear, doesn't expect you to know everything about art (or indulge too much all of those people who like to spend five minutes generously sharing with the class how a painting makes them feel). If you can get him, take him. I went into Art Hum wary because of the many bad experiences people have with it, but I ended up loving the class, remembering what I learned, and really feeling that it was a valuable experiences. In fact, if it hadn't been required I would have taken his class anyway in a heartbeat. I have to say, for a core class that's pretty extraordinary.

Apr 2004

Professor Oryshkevich is truly a gem. Brillant is all I can say. After having spent some time at Columbia, I've learnt the distinction between someone who knows their stuff as opposed to someone who can actually teach. Professor Oryshkevich is both. What I find impressive is that when she asks a question and if the answer isn't what she is looking for, she is able to link the 'wrong' answer to the 'correct' answer. That has a profound impact, since it allows you to remember more vividly on what the material is about. I wouldn't say she is a lenient professor but she gives you chances to make up for your grade should you bomb any of the exams/essays. An A in this class is not easy. Be prepared to work your ass off, especially with the essays. An extremely friendly professor who will make the extra effort to help you outside her office hours. To me at least, your grade accurately reflects how much effort you put into the course.

Apr 2004

Now that I'm no longer in Ms. White's class, I miss it more than ever. I was lucky enough to get into Art Hum as a first year, and I completely loved my experience (I've always loved art, but this course solidified my plans to do an art history concentration). Ms. White did an incredible job of catering to everyone in the class, as some of her other reviewers have noted. She made sure to explain the basic concepts to those with little or no background in art history, while working with students who had more experience outside of class to make sure the material was interesting for them, as well. She even lent me one of her personal books for my University Writing papers, since I was writing on Andy Warhol. She was very flexible in terms of setting up review sessions, always extended her office hours, during which she welcomed both academic and non-academic conversation, and always made an effort to keep us awake, smiling, and appreciating the art. I never really cared for art before the 18th century before, but Ms. White gave me a newfound appreciation for it. One of the things most refreshing about Ms. White (aside from the delicious cider and cookies she brought about twice a month!) is the fact that she's not as jaded as many of the other Columbia grad students and professors. She is as willing to learn from her students as they are from her. This really helped foster a sense of classroom community and make you feel like your in-class comments were worth making. This semester, Ms. White even took me and a few of my classmates to some art gallery openings, which were really cool. Her unbridled passion for art was evident on this trip, as well as during the various museum visits we made as a class. If you can find a way to finagle your way into Ms. White's class, then do it!

Apr 2004

Eric Anderson makes Art Hum completely painless. You get a good overview, you don't have to do any of the reading, and the papers are graded fairly easily. If you're really interested in art history, you probably shouldn't take this class with Anderson. The classes are not incredibly exciting or informative. But, if you're just looking to get the requirement out of the way, Anderson is the guy for you! He's also REALLY nice. The only annoying thing is that the students speak in class more than he does.

Feb 2004

I'm going to have to emphatically disagree with the previous review. Ms. Oryshkevich is actually a pretty good professor, who teaches an all-around decent class, and she's pretty friendly to boot. She ensures that class discussion proceeds at a slow but regular pace. Those who are intelligent but uneducated in art will probably find that she goes a little too slowly or is a little to easy on the student but that the class is nonetheless a solid introduction. Those who are well versed in the discipline, though, might have reason to complain that it is all just too easy.

Feb 2004

Ms. White is one of the best teachers I've ever had. She is approachable and inspiring. I loved this class despite the fact that I've taken art history courses before, Ms. White ensured that I had engaging assignments and wouldn't be bored. Ms. White also is willing to adapt to students' needs and spend time with them outside of classtime. Class discussions never lull, and she participates in the discussion, and doesn't speak down to the students. The museum visits are a lot of fun, and Ms. White speaks eloquently on many subject areas. Overall, I had a fantastic time in this class, and I highly recommend Ms. White to any and everyone. She brings great treats, too!

Jan 2004

I've been to both ends of it with this guy so I feel capable of giving a good evaluation. What I mean is that I hated this class for the first 4 or 5 weeks. There's something about him that drove me crazy. The other reviewers are right, he won't know you name, and he can go on and on. He has this particular way of looking at art that drove me crazy. I wanted passion and meaning and interpretation! I mean hey, this is art right! On top of that he uses words like 'coiffure' and 'conflagration' in ordinary conversation. Like, I know what they mean, but can't you just say 'hair' and 'fire?' BUT - he really turned it around for me. I got over 'my' way of looking at art. He got me to look at it from a new standpoint, something more basic, that relied on what you could actually see versus what I felt I saw. It was an enlightening exercise and I feel like my relationship to art deepened several notches by the end of the course. I guess what I want to say is, this guy actually taught me something, even though our personalities clashed at first. That's pretty cool in my book. By the middle of the semester, I looked forward to this class.

Jan 2004

Prof. Mercer is probably the best professor I've had at Columbia. She is insightful and funny and laid back AND approachable. After you finish this course, you will want to be her friend and hang out with her and her kids after class. Seriously. The lectures were not boring at all (contrary to the art hum stereotype) and the premise of the class was actually to learn the material rather than read up on it and memorize names and dates. Instead of reading every night, she instead encourages students to "look" at the paintings to understand them on a personal level. It's great. And Since she is the head of the Philosophy department as well, she does a great job in bringing the paintings into the larger context of the thought process of their time periods. If you end up in Prof. Mercer's Art Hum class, feel blessed. After I taking Art Hum with her, Im now contemplating majoring in Art History and I'm trying to register for any other classes that she teaches. You will really come out with a true understanding and appreciation of the material after her course.

Jan 2004

I took jaleh's class fall 2003, and it was remarkable and the highlight of my core experience thus far. Jaleh is an amazing teacher, who runs the class in a socratic style, which is wonderful for keeping you awake in the dark classroom. Work is really light, and the classes are always interesting. Jaleh knows her s**t, and if you care to participate you will too.

Jan 2004

Abigail is the best teacher I have had since being at Columbia. She was well informed, friendly and led very interesting discussions. She always managed to be the perfect combination of fair yet firm in both her grading and assignments. I found her to be extremely approachable. Because of Abigail, I finally found a "core" class that I liked and left feeling enriched and educated. Abigail is a fantastic teacher and I only wish I could take her class again!

Jan 2004

Mr Onafuwa is an engaging and brilliant instructor. He obviously knows his stuff, and he expects a lot from his students. You will learn a lot from his class, but don't expect to get an easy A. If you want an easy class where you don't have to participate or do any reading THIS IS NOT THE SECTION FOR YOU!

Jan 2004

Lucy made Art Hum an enjoyable experience. In fact I had such a good time taking this course that I can easily say it's the best core class I've taken, and one of the best I've had overall at Columbia. She really knows her stuff about the the artists and architects (her background is in architecture). Her lectures were packed with interesting slides of the artists' works and the best part is that she actually let the students make most of the comments about the art. She constantly asks the class for their thoughts or ideas, and seems to genuinely appreciate different student perspectives. Like other good Art Hum teachers, Lucy also made the class take advantage of NYC's resources. At the beginning of the semester she took us on a class field trip to the Cloisters, and then 2 out of our 4 individual papers also required going out to art museums (Met, Frick, MoMA). Her grading on papers is not terribly difficult, at least not after you learn to do formal analysis - which she will teach you. The midterm and final were also straightforward if you payed any attention at all during class, but be sure to spend some time memorizing key dates before you take the exams.

Jan 2004

Ms. White is God's gift to art hum. She is beautiful, intelligent, kindhearted, patient, and everything wonderful in a teacher. I went in knowing absolutely nothing about Art History, and I came out with a functional vocabulary and knowledge of the history of major artists. If this is the goal of the Core Curriculum, she has managed to achieve it. We had one particularly awkward and strange person in our class, and she was without fail patient and kind with him, working to make him feel part of the class. She also did really well at forming a family atmosphere in class. If you have the opportunity to have class with her, you are very very lucky. And I got an A. The kind of teacher where you feel disappointed if you don't perform well on tests and papers, which she is flexible about deadline-wise.

Jan 2004

Aw, loved her! Emily was extremely nice and approachable. She is very young, so the information is fresh to her. Sometimes she's not sure about facts, in which case she tells you so, instead of making something up, like some teachers tend to do. She was really insistent that our class bonded and took us out to the Hungarian pastry shop after visiting St. John the Divine. We also had a movie night, where we watched the Thomas Crown Affair and snacked. She is a relatively fair grader-- take advantage of her offers to look at drafts before they're due.

Jan 2004

If you get into his section, DROP IT OR SWITCH TO ANOTHER SECTION. Don't get me wrong he explains the material VERY well and you will learn alot, but he has to be the most condescending instructor I have ever had in any subject ever. He will pick on everyone in class and call on you for answers or interpretation whether you like it or not. If you look like you haven't done the reading, he will DEFINITELY pick on you. He constantly makes , in my opinion, defamatory comments to people he does not like and that usually means everyone (unless you declare that you are an art history major and show it, then you will get the red carpet treatment). Mr. Onafuwa has absolutely no regard for the feelings of his students or for views that conflict with his own. DONT EVER BE ABSENT because you have to call his house and present a logical excuse that he will follow up on and your grade will suffer if you do not attend. You have to do all of the readings when he says to do them because he questions everyone in class and if you don't know the answer you will be ridiculed and penalized for it. It is like being in junior high school again with his constant babying and criticizing of everyone. Ever need an extension on work or a paper? TOO BAD, you will not get one here even if one of your parents died, if by some stroke of magic you do, it will come with the appropriate lecture and belittling. If by some crazy turn of events that you have to take his section or want to take it, you had better hope you step in dog s**t because ur gonna need good luck to live through his pompous personality.

Jan 2004

This is a class you definitely want to stay in (or try to get in to.) Ms. White is fun, easy-going, helpful, and very knowledgeable. She has an extensive background in art history and Italian studies. She is one of a few teachers that make you want to learn and love the subject. She normally gives a brief background overview of an artist, and then shows several works using a slide projector, while she and the class hold a discussion on each work. She is very polite and respectful, and encourages participation. She is available for extra help, and even asks students to call her or email her if need be. She is always willing to help you on your paper assignments, and may sometimes take a re-submission into consideration. She is flexible (all teachers have their limits though) and in no way out to get you! When I was studying with other students from different Art Hum classes, I noticed and felt good about how in depth our class went over the material compared to the other classes (and it never seemed high stress at all during the semester!). The key to doing well in her class is 1) go to class 2) pay attention and take notes (you'll do great on the exams) 3) participate.......The paper topics are clear and generally easy, but she grades them thoroughly, but fairly, with a pick and comb- but don't worry- like the others said the grade isn't as bad as you would imagine. The midterm and final were easy as long as you studied and paid attention in class. The readings were short and almost optional- again, as long as you pay attention to the discussions of them in class, you'll do fine in incorporating them in the exams. The final and midterm consisted of ID's, short answer, comparison, and essay-- they were do-able, just a lot of writing! The museum visits are interesting and exciting- she is currently a curator for the Met. Ms. White made Art Hum informative, creative, relaxed, and enjoyable.

Jan 2004

Abigail is that rare core professor with the enthusiasm and excitement that cross the line from an acceptable core experience to a thoroughly enjoyable one. It was her first semester teaching art hum, but Abigail met the challenge with ease and good humor, prepared her lectures in an engaging manner and got past standard setbacks like falling behind schedule with ease. At the beginning her inclusion of class members in discussions got to be slightly excessive, but leveled out and increased the intellectual stimulation a considerable amount later on. Her lectures on modernism and Picasso were outstanding, and caused at least one student to hopefully pursue more art history classes at some point in the future. She will make an outstanding professor in any course she teaches.

Jan 2004

4 star teacher! Do not drop this class if you are in it! This is how I imagined a Core Course should be since unfortunately, I have had horrible professors for my previous Core Courses. He is very enthusiatic about the material. You can tell that he enjoys teaching. He makes a lot of the material for the art hum website so he really knows what he's doing. You can feel his passion for art and its infectious. At the end of the semester, he brought in cans of paint, a canvas and various painting tools with which we tried to re-create a Pollack. It was an awesome experience as he allows you to experience what it's like to create art.

Jan 2004

An absolute peach, this one. Snotty, but charmingly so! As previously mentioned, her class is a definite survey- a shell of a class, really. The upside of the sweeping over-glossing of art history is, of course, that beyond the three papers and three museum trips- no work is required. If you're looking for depth, look elsewhere, but if you're looking for a really amusing teacher and a really undemanding (but not uninteresting) class, set your sights on Rilke.

Dec 2003

Eric is a really nice guy who likes to take his students on field trips to the Met and buys them lunch with the core office money. He also gives a pretty good introduction to art, sculpture, and architecture, which is really the point of art hum. However, if you're looking for an easy A, this is not it. The midterm and final required a lot of memorization (including dates to the nearest 10 years) and as far as I know, there was no curve at all. Also, the papers are graded very harshly: giving an overview of simple observations is not enough for him; he expects you to go above and beyond what you see to describe the painting or sculpture in formal terminology (which I felt was a bit too much for an intro level art class). Overall, a nice young grad student, but not as kind with the grading as he looks. In addition, participation is important, helps your grade, and generally makes you appreciate the works much more, so do yourself a favor and come up with some remarks or comments, even if they seem overly simple or stupid.

Dec 2003

Although Phoebe seems like she could be a cool person to hang out with on the weekends, she just didn't run a great Art Hum class. She specializes in the earlier part of the semester, so by the time you get to Impressionism you are really not given that much help into understanding the works. She definitely does know some important aspects of each piece of art, but her knowledge seemed to be very limited. On top of that, grading could be harsh and paper guidelines were unclear. I think Phoebe has the potential to be a good teacher someday, but she just isnÂ’t comfortable enough with teaching at the moment. You wonÂ’t hate this class with a passion, but it will definitely annoy you.

Dec 2003

Well she isn't a saint as far as art hum teachers go but she isn't horrible either. She definately picks favorites in her classes so try to get on her good side. I did just as well as some of my friends in the class on the midterm and papers (and I know I did well on the final) and I received a B while everyone else got a B+ or A-. Not fair but I couldn't contest it. Just go to class and do the reading and you won't walk away with anything less than a B

Dec 2003

Christian is fantastic. He is extremely intelligent and really inspires a love of art (or at least an active interest in it) in all of his students. He is also hilarious --he is constantly cracking wry little one-liners. Get him talking about his love of fine dining and his ability to out-eat any of his big, football-playing students in one sitting and you'll be rolling on the floor with laughter. Overall, Christian's class is one you look forward to coming to every day. He is very insightful and wants all of his students to engage with the works and participate in the discussions. At the end of the class, you'll want to take him out to dinner, listen to him pontificate about whatever pops into his head, and watch him consume 13 desserts in succession.

Dec 2003

Christina made me want to stay in her class. After switching and dropping out of a couple Art Hum classes before, I felt compelled to stay in her class (despite the 10:35am time). If you want an Art Hum teacher to tell you side stories of artists, mix in personal research, and require you to know the ins and outs of art history and style, she's not the teahcer for you. Christina will emphasize the "survey" aspect of Art Hum by glossing over the major artists, works, and themes in an easygoing and accessible manner. Her casual attitude in the classroom is seen through the emphasis on discussion and flip critiques of artists. Overall, not a bad way to get through the Art Hum requirement. Oh, and she's ridiculously cute!

Dec 2003

The "character assassination" that one reviewer attempted is totally wrong-headed and mean-spirited. Jaleh is one of the most interesting graduate students I've had at Columbia; the fact that her method of teaching Art Hum involves a lot of contemporary criticism (and some resulting jargon, like "desublimate," "problematize") simply makes the class better and more interesting to a contemporary audience. Other teachers are likely to rehash old, dead arguments, and make the works seem, consequently, old and dead. Though I'm not an art history major, the stuff I learned from her class gave me material for a senior thesis. If I had time, I would gladly take another art history class. The fact that the class completely expanded my understanding of the visual arts is enough for now.

Dec 2003

A really terrific professor. Christian is extremely well versed in art history and theory, and despite his dull monotone voice, he is extremely engaging. He is very committed to students (a welcome change from the usual crop of power-hungry destructive grad students) and goes above and beyond the call of duty to help students succeed. As an added bonus, he is extremely funny (although this part of his personality only came out in the latter part of the semester) and be sure to ask him about his ability to eat 13 desserts consecutively.

Dec 2003

Professor Klein is absolutely fantastic. I love him.. my class seems to love him... and overall, he makes art humanities an extremely enjoyable experience. I came into the class with little to no knowledge of art and left with not only a great handle on the basics of momumental art and art movements through history, but a love for the subject and a desire to learn more. He makes art fun. Take his class... don't switch out if you get his section!!!

Dec 2003

I had Jaleh last spring, and I don't know who wandered into her class this year, but they've got everything ALL WRONG. Jaleh is superb. She wants you to understand the works inductively. Her Socratic method is the best way to come to raise important questions about the works because if people's points don't hold up, then the class cannot stack a discussion on top of them. She forces you to abondon preconceived notions and easy answers. While there may be the occasional lapse into "bulls****", this is not Jaleh's fault. People should not speak if they know they aren't making sense. Yes, there's a little jargon, but new-fangled verbs are in every humanities class at Columbia. In Jaleh's case, they don't detract from her points. She is extremely encouraging, and anyone who doesn't realize how perceptive she is or how much she cares about the material should trying staying awake when the lights go off. Also "synecdoche" is a Greek word, and as is the case with many, everyone pronounces them differently. That is not indicative of her intelligence or ability to make the course great.

Dec 2003

Kate was really enjoyable to have for a professor, the final, paper, and midterms were all fairly easy and she is easy to talk to. She made the class intresting and even brought us back candy from Rome. I would recomend her

Dec 2003

exceptional. lectures were compelling and the discussions she led were also valuable. i learned a great deal in this class and it was a pleasure to attend. this is the best core class i have taken, and this is due entirely to her aptitude, knowledge, and kindness. i wish my other classes were as good.

Dec 2003

Mr. Onafuwa is young and puts on airs of worldliness (he is "worldly" in the traditional sense--he's Nigerian and lived in Europe for a good part of his life--but he's also very condescending) that definitely turn some students off. But he is a very good art hum lecturer. All you really need to do for the class is memorize, and he can definitely make you do that. The papers are the only place where you have to be insightful, even the long-answer test questions are just memorization of the symbollism he points out to you, but he grades those pretty easily. Sometimes a very nice side shines through but don't be fooled because all throughout class he will try to "keep you in line" by catching you off-guard and putting you on the spot. So be sure to do the readings and LOOK AT THE WEBSITE so you don't look like an idiot in class.

Dec 2003

If I had some extra time I would start a Christia Mercer fan club. She made this class enjoyable and entertaining. She really is an amazing woman and professor. She knows a ton about both philosophy and art which led to interesting discussions about the two. She also has a great sense of humor and isn't lacking in self-confidence. She was never shy about letting us know how busy/important she was or how many committees she was on. But that's half the fun. She grades fairly, is very accessible to students, and leads very thought provoking discussions that get most people in the class involved. I thought art hum would be a drag but I was pleasantly surprised...and I have Christia to thank. I'd like to nominate her for CULPA Gold Nugget status.

Nov 2003

I agree with both reviews. I went into this class full of enthusiasm and interest but she definitely put me off from taking any further art history class.

Nov 2003

Ready to look at and memorize a lot of slides? Then Sara is your teacher. Every single class was staring at slides, some interesting and some really boring. She usually engages the class in analyzing the works, however. Art with Sara was usually not boring, and she's helpful and nice, especially if you ask for help. For one of the essays, I asked her to look at a draft and she spend two hours of her own time sludging through my analysis of a sculpture. I made her revisions and got a B+, so go figure what you can from that.

Nov 2003

Ahhhh, what can I say about Mr. Onafuwa....he's not great. The man apparently knows his s**t, but he can be very condescending. When I was in his class, I sometimes felt like I was in junior high school, where the teacher would baby us as far as homework and readings. Maybe if he'd lighten up a bit, his students would actually care. The assignments and tests were very fair, but his sometimes arrogant, haughty attitude made me just get up and leave the class. His behavior may be because this is his first year teaching a class, but he needs to learn how to loosen up a bit. All in all, he's not bad, but pick another teacher if you have the chance.

Nov 2003

She is way cool, way easy, and way smart. She seems like she's not going to know that much because she is young and actually cool, but she includes lots of random references that let you know she really knows her stuff. I highly recommend her.

Nov 2003

First, whatever you say about her character, Meredith is a great teacher. If nothing else, she got me super interested in the class--and I had never even been to the Met for my first three years ago. She is definitely a very effective lecturer who cares about quality not quantity; she didn't make us memorize exact dates (just approx. periods) and eliminated a lot of unnecessary readings to make our lives easier, and even today I remember most of the things she said. Personality-wise, she's not really mean or arrogant as some others suggested. She just has a lower tolerance for certain things than your average teacher. These things include not paying attention to her in class (which she seemed to take personally) and bad writing. If you speak often and put some thought into your papers, you'll be fine.

Nov 2003

This woman is a trip. She is hilarious. She has no problem stating her opinions about the art work which are in most cases very entertaining. She's smart, and energetic and makes an effort to keep her students engaged and to help you appreciate the material.

Nov 2003

Andrew Tallon is one of the best Art Hum professors out there - trust me, I've shopped and cycled through a series of Art Hum classes for the past several semesters. His enthusiasm and unbridled passion for the material makes the class quite interesting. He is amazingly friendly and approachable outside of the class; he is willing to help you out in whatever situation you might find yourself in. The class itself is not as enthusiastic as he is, but we manage to get into 5-10 minutes of reasonable discussion from time to time. Take his class if you can.

Nov 2003

Ms. White is a fascinating and inspirational teacher who is extremely passionate about and knowledgeable in art history. With an extensive background in art history and italian studies, she carries out informative discussions eloquently and enthusiastically, oftentimes pronouncing words with an Italian accent that's fun to hear. The work load is manageable- short readings and three papers within reasonable length. She corrects each paper thoroughly and gives advise on how to improve your writing skills. She never hesitates to provide help when asked and usually stays way past her office hours to help students. A truly wonderful teacher who's able to make Art Hum fun, relaxing, and enjoyable to learn.

Nov 2003

Professor Tallon is young and extremely energetic. Tallon makes lots of short films to help understand the art, as he is a pretty accomplished film-maker. He can't help but hide his child-like excitement for the material, and I can't help but get really excited about all kinds of art just listening in class. It gets a little sad when a lazy, tired class doesn't respond to his enthusiasm every single class. However, if you can get over feeling bad for not being as excited as Tallon is, you'll probably love the class

Nov 2003

"Ms. White," as she requests to be called, is a nice and fairly easy professor. It's easy to doze off in her class because of the slide projector and dim lighting, so make sure you bring a cup of coffee. Her midterm was easy, and so are her paper assignments. There's one 2-page paper and 2 5-page assignments, unlike some of the other art hum teachers, who assign a 10-page "research" paper. Watch out, though... she's a stickler when it comes to grading! I think most people got B+'s on the first paper, but one would expect a C- if they looked at the amount of red ink on each page! She's a knowledgeable professor and is currently writing a thesis on 17th century Italian drawing. She's willing to work outside of class with students who have some background in Art History to make the course more interesting for them. Finally, she doesn't ever give quizzes over the reading assignments, which are always very light. She did require we integrate them into our midterm, but you only had to be familiar with 2 or 3 of them. She's nice, a fair grader overall, has a great sense of style, and isn't afraid to laugh.

Nov 2003

You will learn something here for sure. Since there is not much choice for the core classes as to what prof you'll get, you should be happy with her. She is a grad student and has studied in Italy-so she knows her shit! She is pretty demanding and makes clear that arthum is not a cake walk at all...but she is very nice and helpful and incredibly supportive especially when you are interested and attend class regularly. Overall, if you have her be happy-it could be much worse!

Nov 2003

Terrible. She's a moderator of random class discussion, not a teacher. She shares absolutely nothing with the class. She puts slides up on the projector screen and asks the class "what do you make of this?". The rest of the class consists of your classmates talking out of their rectums, and Jaleh either responding "that's great" or shooting disdainful, condescending glares in the direction of the speaking student. She routinely uses big words that she doesn't know how to pronounce (synecdoche). When my classmate called her on it, she said she must have pronounced it right because she looked it up in the dictionary before class. One, that is a telling and pathetic response. Second, I went back after class and looked it up, and indeed she mispronounced it. She also likes to transform adjectives into nouns to make herself sound sophisticated (verticality). So pathetic. I got so frustrated that I decided I would say something that made absolutely no sense and see how she would respond. It didn't matter. Tell her that the Parthenon's columns encourages your eyes to move vertically up the structure and she'll compliment your artistic intuition. Try to come up with something intelligent to say and she'll give you the "you must be some kind of idiot" look. I remember this one long-winded kid who would always start to make a point, change his mind in the middle and then say he wasn't sure what he was trying to say. This was the most refreshing part of the course. i was relieved that at least one kid owned up to not knowing what the hell he was talking about. The rest of the class was spewing as much bulls**t as possible, in the hopes that Jaleh would like something they said. AWFUL.

Nov 2003

You are very lucky if you land this professor. There are no required readings in this class, because he does not want to overwhelm his students. Art is a visual exercise and Robin understands its intrinsic value, so he does not assign any readings, only recommends them. The workload is fair and the tests are pretty standard. I highly recommend this professor for he has made a topic so subjective as art, a unique and individual experience.

Oct 2003

Wow!!! My favorite instructor to date. I took her course over the summer so it was a little bit shortened, but we crammed so much into those nine weeks. I now have a new and wonderful understanding of the world of art. Rebecca has the most beautiful speaking voice you'll ever hear. Furthermore, she is endearing, caring, sensitive and allows you to make your own mistakes before gently nudging you in the right direction. My only complaints are that it was difficult to write notes in a dark room (later I couldn't decipher what I wrote), and the final exam was a little tricky. Otherwise, this was the most interesting, joy filled, life altering courses you will ever take!

Oct 2003

This was the professor's first class teaching out of grad school, and it showed. Overall though i thought it was a good class, and that he'll improve in the future. Pinson clearly knows his stuff, and when he discusses a work you get a good understanding of it . The problem lay in the fact that this was a somewhat rare occurrence. He usually let the classes discuss works and tried to guide it to the right answer, which was often time consuming. Although in general he seemed a very lenient grader, he was somewhat unclear in his paper and midterm assignments and thus would be disappointed with the results. Specifically in the paper he was looking more for visual analysis of the pieces then the broader thematic significance that the class mostly wrote about, and in the midterm he expected a more in-depth knowledge of each slide than was exhibited. Overall I've learned a lot about art (as someone who didn't know anything about the subject previously) and feel that while in this semester he was probably an average or slightly above average teacher in the future he will probably be good to very good

Oct 2003

I really enjoyed Janet's class. She's a very nice lady and understanding about things that pop up unexpectedly in student's lives. The lectures are also interesting and she's very open to students' comments and mindful that not everyoen comes in with the same level of experience.

Sep 2003

As you can surmise from the other reviews Seth provides a pretty solid Art Hum experience, but there are a few things I'd like to add. First, this isn't a class for serious Art History majors; If you're already comfortable analysing Art at a fairly sophisticated level, you'd probably do well to shop around for a different section. But if, like me, you are simultaneously intrigued and mistified by art stick with Seth. He teaches the otherwise unspoken basics of art analysis pretty well and introduces the problems and aspirations each artist was concerned with. That said class was very discussion oriented and (because of Seth's reluctance to take charge of discussions) moved a bit slowly for my taste--in fact we were almost always behind schedule and had to excise Bruegel and Warhol from the class entirely (that's more than two weeks worth of class). You'll notice two other reviewers call Seth their "TA", this brings us to my only real complaint about the course: class often seemed more like a weekly discussion section than a stand-alone seminar. That is, although the insights into each work that Seth provided were very helpful, they were ultimatley piecemeal; he seemed unwilling or unable to present a synthetic account of each artist's work. In the end I acquired the ability to write about art in a precise way (which afterall is what Art Hum is all about). There must be better sections but this one was good enough.

Aug 2003

Best class I took at Columbia! Great professor.

Aug 2003

Good lecturer. I think her specialty is in Asian art so her breadth of knowledge in art hum (all Western) was impressive. Her paper topics and exam questions were fair and related to what she discussed in class. Her grading was generous but a little strange. She can't make up her mind about grades and it is not unusual to receive a 'B+/A-' on a paper. On the first day of class she told us not to bother doing the reading. However, she gives suggested readings and her lectures usually draw from them so they are valuable if you didn't understand something or missed class. And she only made you know dates to the nearest century. She focuses more on the meaning of art studied than memorization. My only real complaint is that we spent so much time on the Parthenon that we missed a lot of topics that other sections covered.

Aug 2003

Memorizing the dates, names, and force-fed opinions of random paintings and buildings is a horribly antiquated teaching device and is unfortunately the staple of this trivial requirement. But it's not all that bad, maybe I could still win big someday on the art history edition of jeopardy! Oh wait, this is real life and that would never happen.

Jul 2003

Christina was a fun and energetic instructor. She's super nice and very frank. Though she was somewhat harsh on grading throughout the semester, she seemed to give good final grades.

Jul 2003

The one word I would use to describe DAvid is "enthusiastic." He is constantly excited about the work he's discussing, and thereby engages the rest of the class as well. He also has a tendency to make random comments that bear no relation to the art topic, but are extremely funny. All in all, he held my interest very well, even though the class was at night in the summer.

Jul 2003

Seth was really great! Class discussions were always very interesting and engaging. What I loved most was the slow pace of the class. You don't have to do any reading, just go to class. His exams are no surprises either. Everything is straight from class discussions. Seth started off as a tough grader, on the first essay everyone got B or less, but if you went to meet with him or just increased or class participation, essay grades went up automatically too. So don't worry about your grades, Seth wouldn't hurt anyone's GPA. There were people who barely spoke in class, and still they ended up better than most students in other Art Hum sections. So definitely try to make your way in his class!

Jul 2003

A great teacher, very approachable, sincere and sounds interested in the subject and in teaching. He is big on analyzing art so pay attention to the discussion and his lecture, even though he says the readings are important, they arent as far as the mid term and finals are concerened. Really makes one think about art.

May 2003

Professors don't usually teach art hum, so I was really lucky to land in Professor Bahrani's class. She's a great lecturer; this was the first core class where I didn't find myslef hopelessly bored. The best classes were the ones in which we dscussed cultural theory and post-colonial thought, so I would guess that the regular classes she teaches are even better.

May 2003

Prof. Kiaer, if you are not an art history major, is not the godess some other reviewers have made her out to be, but neither is she as bad as another reviewer made her out to be. She is obviously incredibly intelligent, and her lectures are very interesting. Even though the class was my earliest one, I rarely had trouble staying up. On the other hand, she seems to have less patience with her art hum. class than I would guess she would have with her majors. She seemed somewhat detached from the class. Still I would take this class. Rarely in art hum. will you get the chance to be taught by a professor (as opposed to a grad. student), and one so advanced no less. I found her to be a reasonable, very fair grader, and if you participate in her class she will like you.

May 2003

As Art Hum teachers go, he's not too bad, but he's definitely not great. While he knew the material to a degree, he made it very clear from the beginning that Western art was not his field of expertise, and it showed in the way he led discussions and graded. While he was certainly a nice guy in class, that was both a good and bad thing; he never talked down to the students and was very supportive, but also would never stop anyone from talking, and as a result a few students who liked to hear themselves talk were often able to hijack the class to debate irrelevant or factually obvious topics. Grading was relatively fair, and though the rough draft meetings he encouraged were sometimes helpful, he also had a tendency to gloss over problems in your rough draft, only to make such problems the focus of his grading of the final draft. He also missed a number of classes, leaving the last 2 weeks *very* rushed. Overall, an okay teacher.

May 2003

I couldn't stand her at first. She seemed like a snobby, overbearing instructor with a desire to destroy GPAs with a wink of the eye. She teaches with a Socratic style that makes you want to scream "Can we get to the point!" But I realized your classmates contribute more to the overall learning exprience than she does. That said, if your fellow students are asses, get ready to be annoyed. In the end, she is a very knowledgable instructor who really wants to get people away from the stereotypes of art history. Though you will subjected to rather haphazard unstructured discussions at times, she teaches the class the way it was meant to be taught.

May 2003

On his syllabus, Christopher claims to be a "hard-ass," but he is far from it! Sure, he somtimes pretends to not understand what you're asking, but in general he's a good teacher. He kept class interesting and encouraged a lot of participation. He was also very willing/more than happy to read over the rough drafts of our papers and comment on them before the final draft was due. Christopher was funny and down-to-earth, AND he brought us in goodies, like chocolate and Krispie Cream donuts, galore! He also bought us food during our class fieldtrip to the Metropolitan Museum. Plus, I learned a lot!

May 2003

Professor Smith may not be the most dynamic prof in the world, but she is knowledgable and very fair. She understands that this is a required course, and enrolling in it doesn't mean you are "into" art. She respects everyones' comments in class, even if what they say is not at all what she is looking for. She makes herself available outside of class and answers email quickly. Note to varsity athletes in this class: if you are in season, and your "off" day is monday, you will have problems finding time to get to the Met (which is closed only on Mondays), which you have to do 4-5 times for this class.

Apr 2003

This was a great class and I enjoyed taking it. The instructor was always well-prepared and knew a great deal about art history. We looked at many interesting slides and the workload wasn't bad. It was nice to take a class where the teacher didn't seem out to get anybody and was very enthusiastic the entire semester.

Mar 2003

The last review of Denise must have been written by a very bitter person who did badly in art hum and is just angry or else someone really pretentious and obnoxious who has nothing better to do with their time than write nasty reviews about obviously great teachers. Because as you can tell by the rest of the reviews, Denise is amazing. This is my first Culpa review but I couldnt let this really cool, really nice, really smart teacher be bashed. Even though the lights are off most of the time because of slides, I dont think anyone ever fell asleep in this class. Denise always has energy and some witty comment to lighten the mood and she is realistic about her expectations because she knows how much students hate to work hard, especially for a core class. I am totally not an art person and I expected to do really badly in this class, but Denise spent lots of time helping me out, giving me tips, and I ended up getting an A, not because she just gave it to me, but because she actually taught me how to think differently. Do whatever you can to have her for art hum. From the first day, even though I had a schedule conflict with Denise's section, I knew I had to give up something else to stay in her class. And really, the fact that she's not some annoying loser is a huge plus - shes great just to talk to even not about art.

Mar 2003

Klein is from Germany but he corrects your grammar mistakes in your paper more strictly than your L&R teacher, ach! He is very friend and sweet at first( so i did not drop his class), then his moods varies in each class, be extra-careful because he can be really harsh and cynical from time to time, but he can be very patient and nice another time, he hates lateness although he is always late for 5 min. or so, he publicly yells at the girl slept in his class(then the girl left classroom in the middle), he never tells you the answer but keeps asking you the same question--when you finally fed up with this very difficult to please and moody prof. he gives you an OK grade at the end of the semester( at least not as bad as you thought)-and--you can never be his favorite student in class, who you think worths less than a dollar. - Woohwww--your call! but in general, he is better than any graduate students teaching art hum.

Mar 2003

This was the worst class ever. Budd was condescending, annoying, and has a bad dye job. Her only saving grace was her interest in criticizing art restoration. She's a classic case of someone scared off by the art world so they took the more milder path of art history. If that's your case or you know nothing about art (as she puts it, donatello is one of the ninja turtles) this class is for you.

Feb 2003

I was very pleased with this course. Initially I was resentful because I had already taken a course in art humanities at another institution. The first two weeks were boring, but then I really began to enjoy myself! Ms. Banai's teaching style is engaging and her lectures are easy to take yet stimulating. Though she keeps the coursework to a minimum, there are ample opportunities for interested students to immerse themselves in the material. Many of the course readings, both required and optional, offer a nice prompt for other humanites/philosophy/literature courses.

Feb 2003

Robin made Art Hum a genuinely rewarding experience because he knows how to challenge students without overwhelming them. He encourages active participation in class and requires very close analysis of works for essays, but if you attend class and pay attention the written assignments and tests should prove quite manageable. Besides, Robin's easygoing, discussion-oriented teaching style will make you want to attend just for the sake of studying interesting material from a very knowledgeable and talented instructor. His only shortcoming is that his feedback on essays is sometimes too pithy and vague, so go to his office hours at least once to discuss your work in detail.

Jan 2003

David is really nice and enthusiastic, and he leads class discussion very well. He won't accept the "whatever my opinion is on the artwork can't be wrong, because it's an opinion" bullshit, which I like. If you have a legitimate, valid opinion different from his, though, he's accepting of it.

Jan 2003

Christian is the one and only TA who actually took the time out to help me through my classes. Now that's dedication, knowing that I personally do not go out of my way to seek help either. He has a very enjoyable personality, and after getting past that monotone voice of his, you will realize that he's a smart, intelligent, and generous person/TA. And if you could choose anyone to answer an art related question, I would recommend going straight to Christian.

Jan 2003

Seth is a good teacher- bottom line, I really know the art hum curriculum better than my friends who have had other TAs. There is a lot of classroom discussion, and he subtly guides it where he wants so that we actually learn something instead of just hearing ourselves talk. And, as long as he sees improvement over the semester, he'll give you a good grade. Overall, very happy to have had him as my TA.

Jan 2003

Christian IS the RENAISSANCE MAN! If I could take all my classes with him I would. I think he genuinely cares that his students learn something in his class, and makes a real effort to be available and accessible. You can really tell he knows what he is talking about and has a real dedication to his subject. He is pretty easy going with the workload and doesn't make you do B.S. assignments. Overall, from all the other stories I hear, he is the best bet for anyone who wants to take Art Hum.

Jan 2003

she was ok. likes participation a lot. try to just talk in her class, although bs doesn't work. the reading's very heavy but as long as you pick up the main point and talk about it in class, it should be ok. she'll be really impressed too. she's one of those really enthusiastic profs. she'll have you do sketches of sculptures and paintings in the met and take pictures of buildings. so it's a very time consuming class. but on the other hand, she's very encouraging and is not condescending.

Jan 2003

Interesting teacher. Could be good in a few years after she gets some experience. Seems to know something about art and might have some interesting perspectives, but definitely had difficulty teaching art hum. In my view, the core is to teach you about how that discipline relates to the "real world" and your own life. She seemed to view it as an intro to art history and kept talking about how she hoped we all kept taking art history. She would also get frustratingly bogged down in basic details - there was one class period where she spent over an hour trying to get us to describe paintings in extremely basic terms (this is a horizontal line. this is a circle.) which in retrospect was probably useful in some way but extremely painful at the time. Personally, she was very aloof and hard to talk to and seemed to put on this "professor" shell. But I did learn something about art. Could have been worse.

Jan 2003

I was dreading a long, boring survey of art history at 9 am, but David's class was anything but long and boring. Though it had its repetitive moments (think the same painting for almost an entire class) and David insisted on his view more than once, overall the class was interesting and exciting. Everyone got a chance to voice his or her opinion on everything from the works of art to what topics to cover in our extra classes. The class had the perfect balance of history, context, and interpretation, and David was never afraid to be frank about his opinions. Since David is an architect, he was most excited about the buildings we covered - and his enthusiasm was contagious.

Jan 2003

I am only writing this review because I find the other reviews to be a little generous. Christian is decent, but definitely not "the MAN" for art hum. He can be annoyingly pretentious and is overly appreciative of ass-kissing. I didn't get much out of his class beyond being able to play name-that-artist. Never trust grad students who try to win your love with cookies...they're compensating for SOMETHING. That said, he's not bad. From the horror stories I've heard, I wouldn't recommend switching out of his section...but I wouldn't intentionally switch in, either.

Jan 2003

I did not have very high expectations on this class. Yet, I ended up really loving it and left with a whole new appreciation for art. It is obviously hard to be in-depth when spanning art from the Parthenon to Frank Lloyd Wright in a single semester. But Andrew Manson does a brilliant job of it. He is sweet and knowledgeable which makes for a great environment in class. His discreet charm is not apparent until after a couple of classes, so for god-sakes stay in his section whatever your first impression may be. His class made for a truly great Art hum experience.

Jan 2003

I absolutely adored this class. I entered this class with the utmost of dread as I have no background in art history whatsoever. I couldn't tell a Rembrandt from a Raphael and prior to this class, I hadn't even heard of Bruegel! Noit is obviously well-versed in the subject area. She encourages class participation (it's about 20% of your grade), thoughfully written response papers (it's worthwhile to devote some time to them), and a good grasp on the basic issues. I came to love the class and was even willing to do outside reading to gain an even broader understanding of the material we were studying in class. Oh, you also become a regular at the Met as you need to go often to see the works you are going to write on. All in all, Noit and Art History mesh...and so will you and this class if you approach it with an open mind and a somewhat desire to learn.

Jan 2003

I couldn't have had a better art hum experience than with David. He was enthusiastic, even at 9 AM, knowledgeable (seemingly about everything), and easy-going. I would recommend him to anyone.

Jan 2003

She seems nice enough on the first day, until you realize that this bleached blonde, sneaker-wearing cupcake hasn't got much of a heart or a brain. She loved the two Art History majors in our class (what the hell were they doing there anyway?), and condemned the rest of us to her hellish incessant ramblings about the Italian Renaissance (her specialty--don't expect much from any other time period). I took L&R, I got an A. She mercilessly shredded my papers for their "horrendous grammar" and "overbroad generalizations." The average grade was something like a C+ It's such a shame that Columbia chooses to place such mean and incapable people in a classroom. Maybe it's time to realize that good students don't necessarily make good teachers.

Jan 2003

Seth was very green at first (awkward and tense in class), but he loosened up after a few weeks. Relatively slow-moving and big-concept oriented, he taught us the fundamentals without laboring over every work of every artist. Not the most exciting lecturer, but nice enough and knowledgeable. Pay attention in class - all exams and papers can be regurgitated from the discussions. Overall, a good TA who will get better as he grows more comfortable as a teacher.

Dec 2002

Holger's a good teacher. He really knows all the material and is good at leading discussions about it. Sometimes it gets a little boring and its easy to nod off with the lights off, but he's definitely a good professor to have. Occassionally he calls on people and he doesn't give out assignments until a class or two before, but otherwise he's witty and amusing and uber friendly, and a good teacher to have.

Dec 2002

Christian is the MAN for this class - cool, funny, extremely knowledgeable and wonderfully articulate. Classes are interesting and assignments are not difficult but be prepared to do them thoroughly as he isn't a push-over and his good temperment should not be abused - as it can come in handy. Attendance is a plus!, and his steady supply of cookies each class should help even those who are "faint of art." By the time the class is over you'll love it anyway. Come to class with something to say.

Dec 2002

Here's to you if you get this guy. There are a lot of nightmare Art Hum teachers out there, but this is not one of them. He has a slight, Southern sense of humor and a kind nature that is conducive to a 9am class. His lectures are always productive and his papers always clearly graded with comments. Our first class began with a thoughtful analysis of vodka ads, which was a fun and canny ice breaker. All and all, if you can figure out which section this guy's in, go for it. Otherwise email him before you register.

Dec 2002

I was dreading Art Hum, but Aileen was wonderful. She took a group of kids that really had no idea what they were talking about, and made them into people who could talk, think, and write about art. She will only be teaching Art Hum for 3 more semesters (one class each) so get her if you can. She is not easy, but she is very fair, and very good.

Dec 2002

Since you have to take Art Hum, you might as well take it with Christian. He was really great and made the class enjoyable. We didnt do any reading, thus saving a few bucks on the Course Reader. He was pretty easygoing with a light attitude, and he always came to class with a smile and some cookies. It is definetely worth staying in his class!!

Dec 2002

I wouldn't call Tsui one of the amazing Art Hum teachers that completely changes your outlook on art, but there isn't really anything wrong with her. I think she would make an amazing prof. with experience, but she is fresh out of Harvard Grad School. She definitely knows her stuff, but fosters way too much class involvement. In any case, she will increase your knowledge of art, but if you are not art-compatible from the get-go, nothing to write home about. With 4 years under her belt, she would improve. Potential. Very nice too.

Dec 2002

Consider yourself fortunate if you land Christian for ArtHum. He's a very personable, down-to-earth, laid-back instructor, who does an excellent job of making a dull class a lot more interesting. Christian created class discussion with ease, and would prove to be approachable and open throughout the year. Just don't talk to him about Robert De Niro movies.

Dec 2002

Alright teacher, but what a weird class! If you like awkward silences and weird bodily contortions, this is your class-- she asks questions and lets the silence linger for minutes, literally, while making her body into a flamingo-like shape. But she is incredibly nice, really knows her stuff, and grades easily. And almost half the class slept or didn't show up, and she didn't seem to care...

Dec 2002

Denise Budd is cash money. She's funny, interesting, and knows a lot about art and art history. If you can, find out what section of art hum she is taking and get into it. She even brings candy to class-- what more could you ask for? Plus, by the end of the semester, you will be surprised to find out that you've learned a lot and get more out of a typical trip to the museum.

Dec 2002

The above reviewer is right on. Prof. (she recently got her Ph.D) Budd is totally awesome! She knows a ton about Renaissance Art, which is her specialty, and actually makes it interesting with funny quips about the lives of the crazy geniuses we study . Who knew that Michelangelo wore the same boots all the time while he painted the sistine chapel and never took them off! She even organized a dinner paid for by art hum at columbia cottage and entertained the class with funny stories about her adventures in Italy and her crazy art classes at Rutgers U. I hope she becomes a professor because she would totally liven up the art history department with her classy style, sharp wit, and breadth of knowledge....Rock on Prof. Budd! Added bonus: If you take her section, you get to say: My art hum teacher's name is Prof. Budd, which, depending on your group of friends, usually elicits a knowing smile and nod ; )

Dec 2002

You have to absolutely take Art hum with Diana. THere is definitely no better instructor out there for this course. She is extremely energetic and very passionate about what she teaches (especially twentieth century art). She is a very decent grader. She even will let you tweek her assignments if you don't feel too strongly about any of the pieces the art hum board decides you should write about. Diana is always willing to work with students outside of class and often returns quite lengthy e-mail responses to any questions or concerns about the class. She made me become an Art History major and has done the same to several other people I have met. Simply the best. She is one of the reasons I'm glad I have not transferred out of here.

Nov 2002

Don't take this class if you are a wimp, like the other people who have written reviews here. Zeidler does not like to "babysit," but this is a good thing! If you have a shred of self-esteem, you should be able to withstand his minor arrogance quite easily. In return he gives intelligent insight into the works and does an excellent, rigorous job of teaching you how to look at art. By the end of term, though I had never taken any sort of art class before, I actually enjoyed looking at sketches by Breugel and was able to comment intelligently on them. You will probably not get an A in this class (though you can definitely get an A-), but you will actually learn something!

Nov 2002

She's a great teacher, my ass. She's insipid, stupid, idiotic, dull, (add synonym for stupid, don't worry, it won't be excessive). She grades papers based on how they agree with her thoughts, not how well-argued or knowledgeable they are. She's a tricky one too, you'll find out when you take tests. It's surprising how someone this stupid can be crafty.

Nov 2002

I totally disagree with any negative comment made about Page. She is an increadibly informative teacher and her coarse was not only interesting but fun. She took us on many amazing field trips and obviously spent a lot of time preparing fpr this class. She is responsible for all of my newfound knowledge about art in general and is a great teacher !!!

Nov 2002

Christina is a fantastic teacher. She is very approachable and willing to help her students out. I enjoy the class very much. Art Hum is a tough class to teach based on the students limited knowledge of the material before entering the class and the broad spectrum of material these professors are expected to cover. Christina does a wonderful job of making the material accessible and using language we can understand. She is very knowledgable about the subject matter and she is enthusiastic about it and excited by it. It shows in her teaching. Christina assigns only the most appropriate readings. Christina is a very good grader and her assignments are well thought out and allow for the creativity and subjectivity that are needed for true appreciation of art. I fully recommend this instructor for art hum.

Sep 2002

To get a good idea of Sebastian you might be interested to know that he threatened the class not to write a review on CULPA. He said something to the effect of: "I will hunt you down and find out who you are and then see to it that I fail you." Bravo to those that were not intimidated. [CULPA Editor's Note: COOL!!!]

Sep 2002

I've never put so much effort into a class for so low a grade. If you are unfortunate to not have switched sections by now, don't spend too much time on her papers because, as the other reviewers have stated, you will not be compensated fairly for your efforts. Instead, concentrate more on all of your other classes to overcome the fact that this class WILL LOWER YOUR GPA. Make sure you know how to use a apostrophe to show singular possesive on names that end in "s."

Sep 2002

If you like next to no work, take a Page Knox art class. However, if you like professors who don't deliberately misdirect students, please don't. She'll put arbitrary pieces of art on the exam (art shown in class for 1 sec) and arbitrary comments on your papers. Next to no work, easy to get out off with a decent grade.

Sep 2002

Expects too way too much of her students. Heavy on the papers, which are difficult to do; she has no idea that we are just learning Art History and do not have the skills to do formal analyses and comparisons of works. Then she insists that we not refer to outside references/sources, which are necessary to provide any clue as to what to write. Class is really boring, too. Shows millions of slides to demonstrate what is NOT an artist's style (!). Grades papers like it is L&R, but worse, because she is NOT an English professor and just wants you to write exactly as she would, and use the precise words she would. When the class was lost on how to do the papers, she gave a seminar on writing. Even if your content is good, she does not give A's. HARSH, UNFAIR grader, like the other reviewers said. Grade will not match your effort.

Sep 2002

Take her class if you don't mind being interrupted by students walking into class 20 minutes late every day, you have no interest in architecture (Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles-Edouard Jenneret-Gris were ignored despite being on the syllabus), and you think work by impressionists should be referred to as "the kind of work that is hung on bathroom walls." There really has to be something better out there, and her class will definitely NOT be a GPA booster for those more interested in the sciences instead of the arts.

Sep 2002

What a great teacher. I was never interested in art until I took this class. She engages even the most apathetic students and draws out ideas you never knew you had in you. TAKE THIS CLASS!!!!

Sep 2002

Stay away from her course. She lets people waste class time, grades papers very strictly (grammatical errors seem to affect your grade more than the actual content), and doesn't believe in grade inflation. If you want to do well in Art Hum and learn, then don't take her class. She may be a nice person, but that doesn't mean that I would ever recommend her.

Aug 2002

This class makes the core curriculmn worthwhile and meaningful. Becca was the most amazing professor and her engaging lectures clearly manifested her love for art. She encouraged student thoughts and all the class sessions combined lecture and discussion. I never missed a class, nor did I want to. Always available during outside of class and via e-mail, she truly dedicated her time and effort to teaching students about art.

Aug 2002

Rebecca (or Becca as she likes to be called) shares her intense love of art in ALL its forms so sincerely she will open your eyes to seeing almost as if for the first time. She is very patient and really makes an effort to get the class involved; inviting opinions yet providing direction for looking at art in a new way. Although I have been to some of the best museums in the world, I never fully appreciated what I saw until taking Art Hum with Becca. She was really wonderful.

Aug 2002

I'd like to disagree, for the most part, with the last reviewer. Yes, Sebastian is condescending, arrogant, prissy and disrespectful to his students; but his lectures were very enjoyable, extremely informative, and, in general, quite entertaining - and not just because he liked to respond to his students' timid insights with bitter sarcasm; he really knows what he's talking about and usually presents material in an engaging way. His lectures are smooth and pleasantly accented; going to class is like watching TV, if you bring a snack and remember only to participate if you're prepared to be humiliated. But judging by my friends' experiences, I learned much more in Art Hum than the average Columbia student does. It's not impossible to do well in the class, either - I'm not sure he ever gives straight A's but A-'s are certainly attainable.

Aug 2002

No, no, and once again no. Yes, she is a very nice lady, but horrible as a teacher. Her frequent "hard to know" and student centered method of teaching makes her seem like one of the students rather than a teacher. I learned absolutely nothing in this class with the exception of the titles and names of some artists. The reading she assigns has nothing to do with anything she teaches and is not necessary, unless you want to read the material just for your own knowledge since some of it is actually pretty interesting. Her grading of papers is horrible. She rarely comments on your writing and when you get a 79 with a C+ written in paranthesis next to it, and your friend gets an 80 with a B- written next to it, you wonder what that one point (and one whole grade) difference was when neither of your papers has comments on it. The good side to her is that if you want to talk to her about your paper or about the tests, or anything at all for that matter, she is very approachable and will spend as much time as you need to make sure your questions and concerns will get answered. She does have the power trip of a Graduate Art Student (which is what I think she is) in the sense that she expects you to identify exaclty what she is thinking off in your paper, the way you would in a PhD paper and that our love for art history should make this easy for us. What she forgets is that many of us are not in the class by choice, but rather by requirement. She is also big on museum visits which is fun.

Jul 2002

Professor Harrist knows his material and is passionate about it which is great. He is VERY smart. VERY! The problem is that he is pompous, he is stubborn, and grades possibly by tossing darts at a board. His exam questions are totally subjective which makes grading a mystery. Also, he covers no female artists and seems to think that CC is the only College at the University. I watched GS and ESC students grow more frustrated with him as the semester went on.

Jun 2002

Yes, Meredith comes off as both arrogant and mean. She did introduce herself as a professor even though she's only a grad student and does have an aversion to e-mail. But once you accept her, her lively personality makes class quite interesting. I was always wondering what she would say next, sometimes relating to ArtHum and sometimes not. She didn't assign much reading at all and expected her students to grasp the small amounts she did assign. My biggest problem with her was that the class was perpetually behind the syllabus. We didn't even finish Picasso before the end of the semester... Meredith just likes to talk about the each painting to such an extent that you dont cover too much in each class. Her lectures are also all over the place in my opinion. She jumps from topic to topic and what she is saying often doesn't correspond to the slides she shows. Also annoying is her inabilty to remember what order she loaded the slides into the projector. Despite the ranting by others, I found her grading to be more than fair.

Jun 2002

Noit is a pretty good teacher, and she expects her students to be good students - this means that she pushes class participation, which leads to a lot of time spent listening to bs. The course isn't very hard, but she really does want everyone to know the stuff. It's pretty obvious what she likes and what she doesn't, both in terms of how much time you spend on stuff and how much she knows and can impart about it. She has a habit of making snide comments to people who come in late, and personal contact with her is otherwise... well, kinda odd. She's very all business, never any friendly chat. I can't honestly say that I loved her class or that I learned much, but you could do a lot worse for an art hum teacher.

May 2002

It could be worse is probably the best thing I could say about Sebastian. If you love being condescended to, then he's the preceptor for you. Art Hum is a dreadful class in its structure and subject matter -- no doubt about it. Sebastian does not make it any easier. He's very knowledgeable and oftentimes quite funny. However, there are a few problems with his style of teaching. He presents every one of his opinions as fact. I'm no expert in art history, but I do know enough about the field to recognize where an instructor is injecting his opinions. He has little tolerance for anyone who disagrees with him. He is also one of the most patronizing people I've ever met. He's very quick to laugh at ideas with which he does not agree. And more than a few times, he's bluntly told a person that he/she had a wrong idea. It's odd because he expects everyone to know as much about art history as he does, but he wants no one to formulate his/her own opinions. Many of his lectures were quite boring; there was something about his completely monotone German accent that seemed to put most of the class to sleep. And though I'm not Catholic, I was shocked to hear how many slights he made against the Catholic Church; it was certainly inappropriate. And for all you over-achievers out there, he announced early on that everyone would get B's, which most of us did. Most everyone received somewhere between a B+ and a B-, so if you're trying to protect your GPA, then watch out! He's an unnecessarily hard grader. I've heard much worse things about Art Hum instructors, but Sebastian is no picnic either. I would NOT recommend him.

May 2002

Meredith is really really NOT THAT BAD. Promise. In fact, she's pretty awesome. She knows her stuff down cold, is articulate, bright, and entertaining. She wants to make Art Hum more than just the standard two-dimensional couse and enriched the class with field trips to the Met and review sessions. While she can be grating, I learned a lot from her as a person and an instructor

Apr 2002

Despite what I had heard, I had a great Art Hum experience because of David. He loves what he is teaching, is very engaging, and respects his studies alot. He does not assign alot of out of class stuff - reading or otherwise, and there is alot to be learned from him

Apr 2002

DO NOT listen to the other reviewers; they're far too jaded. I would go as far to say that Meredith Davis is actually one of the best (if not the best) teacher I've had at Columbia. I am in no way an art history buff, but she made the class interesting enough that I only skipped one or two classes. I really didn't notice any of the arrogance that the other reviewers mentioned. The discussions in class were generally interesting and Meredith accepted the majority of students' views on a piece while voicing her own perceptions of the art. The workload wasn't difficult at all, and I got through the class without doing any of the readings. The papers were short (6 total of 2 pages each) and the midterm and the final weren't too difficult. I got through the class with an A without much effort.

Apr 2002

DENISE BUDD ROCKS MY WORLD. Funny, incredibly knowledgable, and, best of all, laid back, she makes what could be the most boring class incredibly interesting and chill. You will anxiously await the next time she tells a story about illegaly photgraphing art on one of her many trips to Italy or expounds (much like Professor Beck) on the evils of art restoration. I wish this woman were a Prof, i would worship at her office!

Apr 2002

The previous reviewers are far too hard on Meredith Davis. She is, deep down, actually a very kind and helpful woman. She really does want her students to learn, and she does a pretty good job of making the course interesting. As the semester progressed she eliminated many of the readings or and replaced some of them with very interesting material. The response papers stimulate original thought if you actually put time into them. As far as her being critical of the class, from what I saw she was completely justified in doing so.

Apr 2002

I have no idea why this Prof is getting so many negative reviews. Class was really exciting and even fun at moments. And I stayed awake despite the fact that it began at 5:30. Professor Davis said she expected excellence and, from what she said, got a lot of really sloppy papers at first. She took the time to go over what was wrong with the papers but I didn;t resent that , since I went from a B- on my first paper to an A on my last two, by following her directions. She IS a hard-ass and I think she felt she had to be tough because we had some real slackers who made discussion rest on the few of us who were actually awake and doing the (very light) reading. She made funny (bawdy) jokes now and then and really loves the art - this comes accross and makes it more interesting - atleast she was not bored with the material - ever! Even though she talked tough she had very fair grading practices that she was completely open about, and was flexible (even though she said she wouldn't be) when I had trouble with a deadline. She was very available despite being allergic to email. AS for content, I appreciated that she eliminated a few readings as we went along, and she did try to get class discussion going. She was tactful about taking a really dumb comment and trying to turn it around into something valuable. I dont know about the other reviewers, but in my section, people said some really inane things at times, and I dont resent the Prof for redirecting the conversation. I dont mind if the prof has a point to make int the class - in fact, I expect them to!

Apr 2002

There's no need to be so harsh on J.C. She might be a tad boring, but she's such a sweet, sweet woman. She tries very hard, and is quite understanding. Her attempts to foster class participation alternate between asking questions that are too obvious or incomprehensible and too broad. The quality of the class will also heavily depend on the students themselves, ie, whether everyone insists on being comatose and braindead or volunteering intelligent comments. Unfortunately, the whir of the projector and the darkness of the room foster sleepiness and tuning out.... But hell, at least she's nice!

Apr 2002

Diana was an excellent teacher. She was extremely enthusiastic and knowledgeable. She was also very accessible outside of class, often returning lengthy email responses to questions. She was very skillful in encouraging discussions in class and receptive to new ideas. The only catch was that she talked really fast and the poor acoustics in the room that I took the class in made it difficult to understand her at first--but you'll get used to it. Diana's passion for art was obvious and contagious. I eagerly recommend Diana to anyone interested in learning about art and getting the most out of art hum.

Apr 2002

I agree with the other reviewers, but i didn't think the class as a whole was as bad as they said. meredith is very arrogant and self-absorbed, but i didn't think her attitude affected most of our class time. yes, she'll shut down students' opinions in favor of her own, but she doesn't do it harshy, just with the attidute that she's better than us. in fact, her favorite thing to do is insult the class' writing skills because she wanted us to know that not only did she know more about art than us, but that she was smarter than us too. i think one's impression of the class comes down to how they're affected by that kind of attitude. if you can ignore it, you get a decent understanding of the material with fair class time and an easy workload, if not, she'll just make you angrier as the semester goes on.

Mar 2002

As the other reviewer said, "mean" is a good word to descirbe Meredith, but I might also include "self- absorbed" and "arrogant". She started the class off by telling us not to e-mail her, that she was a professor and didn't have time to answer student mail. A quick look at the directory proved her to be merely a grad student. Way to win your students' affection and respect, Meredith. She proceeded through the semester to ask for opinions, only to interrupt her students, pretending to elaborate on what they had just said, and go off in another direction with her own thoughts. She didn't really listen to students' questions, either about artwork or assignments. In addition, her assignments were notoriously unclear. She assumed her students would have a great deal of foreknowledge about how to analyze art, despite the fact that no one had studied art before. Even when asked to explain her flawed essay questions, she failed to listen to what students were actually saying, and in the end she was disappointed in the results. An unbelievably frustrating class. I did learn something about the art we studied, and Meredith does know something of art. But the knowledge I gained was not worth the aggravation of each class. If you end up in Meredith's section, you could probably do worse, but not much.

Feb 2002

If you have a choice between taking Art Hum with the reincarnated soul of Genghis Kahn and with Meredith Davis, go with Genghis. Simply put, she's a mean person. Occasionally she'll crack a smile and perhaps show a bit of humanity, and then instantaneously she's barking at you again. She likes to give directions for papers and exams and then grade them according to completely different frameworks. Likes to say "no, I don't see that at all" after saying to class "what do you think about this work? any ideas, there are no wrong answers." Has a tendency to refer to students' work with words like "awful" and "terrible". Art Hum has the potential to be a wonderful class; Meredith slaughtered any last chance of its success.

Jan 2002

I wouldn't submit this if I didn't think the review above was slightly unfair. It's true, Rifkind did have a habit of pouncing on an idea as the "right interpretation", however I really do believe that he was open to his students' other views. And for God's sake, this is an introductory course, you know. I really think that part of taking a class like Art Hum is learning what scholars have to say about artists and works of art, and that is what Rifkind taught us. I mean, maybe if you are an art history major, you can reserve the right to start thinking up your own interpretations, but this is an introductory course. I was glad to learn what Rifkind taught us about art, and while I might not buy everything I learned, I certainly feel like I can hold my own in a discussion about the artists we studied. Anyway, I recommend this class. The workload is light, the lectures interesting, and the grading easy.

Jan 2002

Nice enough, available to students, lets you come in late to class. class discussion was uninteresting though, as the other reviewer said certain students talked almost the entire time without shutting up, she didn't stop them from wasting time.

Jan 2002

Frankly, the writing load for this course was insane. We had to churn out a short 1.5 page paper almost every week (to be precise, 11 papers in 14 weeks of class), and each paper required a museum visit (although towards the end, I started using a single museum visit to work on 2-3 assignments simultaneously). The frequent assignments made me feel as if I was taking L&R again (which, needless to say, was not a particularly pleasant feeling). The upside, though, is that she's a relatively easy grader. It's easy to get 'A's for the papers once you figure out what she wants from you, and the midterm and final are ludicrously easy (memorize name, artist, date, etc. and you'll get your 'A'). Looking back, I suppose it was easier to write many short papers for the class instead of a couple of long ones (which seems to be the standard practice), but it really felt like a ridiculous amount of work. It's not a bad course, nor a hard course, but the amount of writing made it tiring.

Jan 2002

A good teacher overall. She knows her stuff and will write tons of comments on your papers. Fair grader but not easy by any means to do well. expect lots of memorization for the midterm and final. Participation counts too and you better do it or she might get ticked off at you.

Dec 2001

Sure she made herself available to her students and relieved work assignments when times were tough, but her class was a joke. She was unengaging and allowed certain students to dominate not only classroom "discussion" but also her own voice. Stay away from her art hum class. There's got to be something better out there.

Dec 2001

Boo! I really wanted to like this class, but Rifkind made it hard to like. We clashed on ideological grounds; I wanted a class where the prevailing attitude was that almost anything you said about a piece of art had some kind of validity, but he wanted a class where he taught us how to arrive at the "right" interpretation. This was achieved through him calling on different people someone said something the "right" thing, and then he would pounce on it and act really pleased that we had come up with The Interpretation all by ourselves. Maybe this is how all art history classes are anyway, in which case I'm glad I'm an English major, but if there's such a thing as a teacher who believes in the infinite interpretability of art, take Art Hum from that person instead.

Dec 2001

There once was a girl who had a passion for art, who wanted to become an architect., who was told she had a talent for art. That girl took this class, and never picked up another brush, threw away her canvases, and became a biochem major, hating art for the rest of her life!

Nov 2001

I loved this class, but I'm partial to art history. Prof Harrist really annoyed me at first because he's very pretentious and also can't admit when he makes a mistake. eventually, however, i realized he really knows his stuff and likes teaching the class. He still says hi to me; i recommend him.

Apr 2001

Schwartz is surprisingly and annoyingly inarticulate. She probably means well, but she seems bored with the material which she's presenting, so she sure hasn't excited me with any of it. And judging from the numerous people who sleep through class every Tues and Thur, she isn't inspiring them either. She never gets away from the most basic discussions of paintings and architecture. While she seems to encourage class participation, she doesn't develop or explicate students' points, except in so far as they fit to her outline for the discussion. easy class, but I would suggest avoiding her if possible.

Jan 2000

He's a knowledgeable lecturer, a top dog in the department, but i would have prefered an Art Hum teacher who knew our names and led real discussions rather than just ask a few questions each class and call it "class participation." But he was interesing to listen to. Really, is knowing our names too much to ask? So much for the personal environment core classes are supposed to create!