course
First-Year Writing: The Americas

Dec 2019

Where do I start? Professor Mehta is quite the controversial figure. Some dislike her, some are ambivalent, and others love her. Her comments, although well-meaning, are for sure occasionally eyebrow-raising and has caused many an eye-roll (and a lot of stifled laughter). Our class was entirely discussion-based - every class is based on a reading or two, and although she initiated the conversation with some guiding questions, the discourse was pretty free-range and went in any direction the students wanted it to. In that sense, the discussion can be very thoughtful and provoking, but if none of us read the readings or if nobody was really interested in the topic at hand, it would not be so fruitful and can even become very shallow. Writing for Professor Mehta is a double-edged sword - on one hand, she is awesome with allowing multiple drafts and many feedback sessions as long as you are prompt and give her adequate time; however, although she gives a lot of freedom regarding topic choice, she does drop hints about what direction she wants the paper to take (and the general consensus among all of us in her class is that she isn't satisfied with "independent choices" unless she agrees with them; so sometimes you'll have to bend your narrative to fit her thinking) which honestly isn't that bad - it just gets on your nerves sometimes. This is a class that requires you to do what you're told and if you do you'll be just fine. It also exposes you to a lot of South American literature that you wouldn't be interacting with otherwise. Although it was a pain sometimes and gave me headaches, Professor Mehta has good intentions and truly wants every one of us to do well. This is beside the point but at the end of the semester, she invited all of us to her place to have Indian food and dessert, which was super heart-warming.

Dec 2019

Where do I start? Professor Mehta is quite the controversial figure. Some dislike her, some are ambivalent, and others love her. Her comments, although well-meaning, are for sure occasionally eyebrow-raising and has caused many an eye-roll (and a lot of stifled laughter). Our class was entirely discussion-based - every class is based on a reading or two, and although she initiated the conversation with some guiding questions, the discourse was pretty free-range and went in any direction the students wanted it to. In that sense, the discussion can be very thoughtful and provoking, but if none of us read the readings or if nobody was really interested in the topic at hand, it would not be so fruitful and can even become very shallow. Writing for Professor Mehta is a double-edged sword - on one hand, she is awesome with allowing multiple drafts and many feedback sessions as long as you are prompt and give her adequate time; however, although she gives a lot of freedom regarding topic choice, she does drop hints about what direction she wants the paper to take (and the general consensus among all of us in her class is that she isn't satisfied with "independent choices" unless she agrees with them; so sometimes you'll have to bend your narrative to fit her thinking) which honestly isn't that bad - it just gets on your nerves sometimes. This is a class that requires you to do what you're told and if you do you'll be just fine. It also exposes you to a lot of South American literature that you wouldn't be interacting with otherwise. Although it was a pain sometimes and gave me headaches, Professor Mehta has good intentions and truly wants every one of us to do well. This is beside the point but at the end of the semester, she invited all of us to her place to have Indian food and dessert, which was super heart-warming.