department
economics

(Economics)

Carlos Montes-Galdon (12 reviews)

Nicolas Schutz (1 review)

Rachel Adams (16 reviews)

Stephanie Lofgren (1 review)

Tumer Kapan (1 review)

Qingmin Liu (4 reviews)

David Weinstein (13 reviews)

Aviva Vivette Ancona (1 review)

John Park (4 reviews)

Sonia Pereira (18 reviews)

Alberto Martin (4 reviews)

William Bentley MacLeod (1 review)

Xavier Sala-i-Martin (82 reviews)

Sung Ryong Kim (1 review)

Atila Abdulkadiroglu (11 reviews)

Pablo Pinto (6 reviews)

Roger Mesznik (12 reviews)

Helios Herrera (1 review)

Guido Sandleris (1 review)

Isabelle Brocas (1 review)

Edward Leung (3 reviews)

Asher Hecht (1 review)

Belinda Archibong (8 reviews)

Travis Baseler (1 review)

Christopher Conlon (1 review)

Edward Steinberg (12 reviews)

Mark Dean (1 review)

Ronald Findlay (7 reviews)

Juan Carlos Hallak (1 review)

Yinghua He (1 review)

Jushan Bai (6 reviews)

Robert Mundell (12 reviews)

Toshi Ichida (1 review)

Donald Davis (2 reviews)

Kate Ho (9 reviews)

Levent Kockesen (21 reviews)

Seyhan Erden (7 reviews)

Bernard Salanie (18 reviews)

Regina Almeyda Duran (4 reviews)

Giacomo Santangelo (4 reviews)

Kim Hyungseok (1 review)

Randall Reback (17 reviews)

Charles Maurin (1 review)

Sanjay Reddy (10 reviews)

Irasema Alonso (12 reviews)

Hector Foreror (1 review)

Mitali Das (14 reviews)

Marc Henry (8 reviews)

Francesco Brindisi (1 review)

Anja Tolonen (1 review)

Lalith Munasinghe (33 reviews)

Aviva Vivette Ancona (5 reviews)

Martin Uribe (15 reviews)

Edward Lincoln (4 reviews)

Marianna Colacelli (1 review)

Bruce Preston (17 reviews)

Tri Vi Dang (9 reviews)

Homa Zarghamee (17 reviews)

David Weiman (40 reviews)

Alessandra Casella (8 reviews)

Anna Catarina Musatti (52 reviews)

Elizabeth Ananat (1 review)

Maria Garibotti (1 review)

Goran Lazarevski (1 review)

Arthur Small (4 reviews)

Dolore Bushati (2 reviews)

Mark Skousen (9 reviews)

Waseem Noor (6 reviews)

Wojciech Kopczuk (5 reviews)

Josh Greenfield (3 reviews)

Ron Miller (11 reviews)

Caterina Musatti (2 reviews)

Padma Desai (30 reviews)

Lena Edlund (8 reviews)

Margaret Madajewicz (1 review)

Joseph Stiglitz (1 review)

Paul Piveteau (2 reviews)

Emily Chase (1 review)

Homa Z (1 review)

Steven Olley (5 reviews)

Anja Tolonen (3 reviews)

Yeon-Koo Che (6 reviews)

Graciela Chichilnisky (9 reviews)

Geoffrey Jehle (1 review)

Phoebus Dhrymes (7 reviews)

Corinne Low (1 review)

Florian Morath (1 review)

Enrichetta Ravina (2 reviews)

Stanislaw Wellisz (8 reviews)

David Munroe (1 review)

Andrea Lange (2 reviews)

Satyajit Bose (4 reviews)

Rohini Pande (1 review)

Emilia Simeonova (3 reviews)

Daniel Brou (0 reviews)

Elham Saeidinezhad (5 reviews)

Marcellus Andrews (21 reviews)

Robert Miller (12 reviews)

Christian Broda (1 review)

Carl Wennerlind (30 reviews)

Till von Wachter (6 reviews)

Guillaume Haeringer (2 reviews)

Ronald L Miller (4 reviews)

Jongho Lee (1 review)

Noha Emara (7 reviews)

Nicola Zaniboni (3 reviews)

Susan Elmes (44 reviews)

Brendan O'Flaherty (63 reviews)

Shoshana Schwartz (1 review)

Diane Macunovich (4 reviews)

Tim Huh (8 reviews)

Peter Bartelmus (2 reviews)

Alejandro Belinky (0 reviews)

Jason Barr (1 review)

Wolfram Schlenker (1 review)

Simon Loertscher (1 review)

Rena Rosenberg (1 review)

Pietro Ortoleva (5 reviews)

Shruti Kumar (1 review)

John Collins (45 reviews)

Eiichi Miyagawa (21 reviews)

Elliott Ash (1 review)

Alex Kardon (2 reviews)

Tamrat Gashaw (11 reviews)

Martina Jasova (7 reviews)

Wout Vergote (3 reviews)

Stefania Albanesi (4 reviews)

Alan Dye (19 reviews)

Ramaa Vasudevan (1 review)

Prajit Dutta (20 reviews)

Pierre Andre Chiappori (6 reviews)

Danilo Guaitoli (1 review)

Sharon Harrison (37 reviews)

Gregory Arluck (3 reviews)

Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe (8 reviews)

Ingmar Nyman (3 reviews)

Dennis Kristensen (7 reviews)

Mariana Colacelli (13 reviews)

Andrew Bossie (2 reviews)

Edmund Phelps (7 reviews)

Chrystomos Tabakis (12 reviews)

Philip Kitcher (23 reviews)

Cameron LaPoint (1 review)

Seyhan Arkonac (16 reviews)

Richard Ericson (10 reviews)

Rajiv Sethi (24 reviews)

Abigail Tay (2 reviews)

Ivan Khotulev (1 review)

Corinne Low (1 review)

Emilio J. Rodriguez (2 reviews)

Alexei Onatski (9 reviews)

Ashok Vora (1 review)

Giorgio di Giorgio (4 reviews)

John Mutter (15 reviews)

Rajeev Dehejia (3 reviews)

Nuria Quella (1 review)

Edward Vytlacil (3 reviews)

Francois Gerard (2 reviews)

Perry Mehrling (25 reviews)

Kyle Bagwell (2 reviews)

Andre Burgstaller (40 reviews)

Alexis Antoniades (2 reviews)

Joseph Onochie (1 review)

Miguel S Urquiola (1 review)

Tatyana Avilova (1 review)

Michael Best (1 review)

Seth Weissman (10 reviews)

Wouter Vergote (15 reviews)

Fillipo Taddei (2 reviews)

Jonathan Vogel (21 reviews)

Paul Durso (1 review)

Carl Riskin (4 reviews)

Miikka Rokkanen (1 review)

Jon Steinsson (9 reviews)

Anna Della Valle (3 reviews)

Michael Riordan (2 reviews)

Geert Bekaert (1 review)

James Harrigan (4 reviews)

Ashley Timmer (1 review)

Sally Davidson (15 reviews)

Jose Cao-Alvira (2 reviews)

Mujtaba Murji (2 reviews)

No name (0 reviews)

Richard Clarida (2 reviews)

Donald Morgan (1 review)

Serena Ng (10 reviews)

Ricardo Reis (14 reviews)

Sunil Gulati (113 reviews)

Kristin Mammen (11 reviews)

  • Advanced Econometrics
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  • May 2021

    I want to set the records straight before my review that I passed the class with an A so my review is objective. to state it bluntly if you care about acquiring a decent knowledge about econometrics and its application to your field of study and of course your grade stay away from professor Erden. Although she seems pretty responsive and always ready to answer questions that are a trap in disguise. First of all, you need to do all the work on your own from reading the book to understanding the application of state and its command and the intuition behind every single interpretation and command and its relation to the real world because if you think you will understand one concept diligently by attending the class you are tremendously mistaken! At first, she was going at a slow pace and it seemed like a breeze and unlike what everyone else before described but man once we hit the third chapter she only cared about finishing the program despite most of the TAs being absent because of the strike and she knows how crucial the understanding of state is crucial to answers the problem set in a decent way of assimilation but she kept on rolling with the lecture and the material while brushing through her notes with a total disregard to our understanding of the most important part which state and its interpretation. I found the material of the class pretty interesting and gripping and I was eager to learn at first but her utter lack of pedagogy disorganized way of teaching and lack of practice when it comes to the real shit was an incentive to never come to class and learn the material elsewhere. You have to do your due diligence outside the class in order to get a slight grip of what is rumbling through during the class and that if you are a quick study. Let's not mention the disastrous and fiasco around her problem sets that keep on repeating themselves every single semester with the answers already published which make the grading unbearable to approach. The question is nothing close to what we covered in the lecture and the level of sophistication of proof demonstrations that are being asked are outside of the scope of what was covered in class! She is also very inconsiderate when it comes to answering emails that are noted as important or urgent or time-sensitive. she is also very insensitive and inconsiderate when making extremely disrespectful and rude comments in front of the whole class. the midterm was a disaster and she did not take into consideration the condition of the exam and its impact on students which made it hard to even skim through each question. For the final, the fiasco was indescribable as she shoved 4 additional chapters that were barely covered in class. it's ironic how she mentioned in class the fact that she makes it hard for us to earn decent grades and it's because she wants us to learn but the vast majority ended up scarred for life hating the subject and neither learning nor earning good grades. I was an exception because I basically busted my b** and it felt like a 3 class, not one. for the midterm and the final she prepares a slide with note lecture that she regurgitates and read in a lousy way without any practice or any chance to practice your mistakes and she calls it a review don't expect to get any sample exam or test. One of the worst classes I've had so far and I've had my shares of bad ones.

    May 2021

    I want to set the records straight before my review that I passed the class with an A so my review is objective. to state it bluntly if you care about acquiring a decent knowledge about econometrics and its application to your field of study and of course your grade stay away from professor Erden. Although she seems pretty responsive and always ready to answer questions that are a trap in disguise. First of all, you need to do all the work on your own from reading the book to understanding the application of state and its command and the intuition behind every single interpretation and command and its relation to the real world because if you think you will understand one concept diligently by attending the class you are tremendously mistaken! At first, she was going at a slow pace and it seemed like a breeze and unlike what everyone else before described but man once we hit the third chapter she only cared about finishing the program despite most of the TAs being absent because of the strike and she knows how crucial the understanding of state is crucial to answers the problem set in a decent way of assimilation but she kept on rolling with the lecture and the material while brushing through her notes with a total disregard to our understanding of the most important part which state and its interpretation. I found the material of the class pretty interesting and gripping and I was eager to learn at first but her utter lack of pedagogy disorganized way of teaching and lack of practice when it comes to the real shit was an incentive to never come to class and learn the material elsewhere. You have to do your due diligence outside the class in order to get a slight grip of what is rumbling through during the class and that if you are a quick study. Let's not mention the disastrous and fiasco around her problem sets that keep on repeating themselves every single semester with the answers already published which make the grading unbearable to approach. The question is nothing close to what we covered in the lecture and the level of sophistication of proof demonstrations that are being asked are outside of the scope of what was covered in class! She is also very inconsiderate when it comes to answering emails that are noted as important or urgent or time-sensitive. she is also very insensitive and inconsiderate when making extremely disrespectful and rude comments in front of the whole class. the midterm was a disaster and she did not take into consideration the condition of the exam and its impact on students which made it hard to even skim through each question. For the final, the fiasco was indescribable as she shoved 4 additional chapters that were barely covered in class. it's ironic how she mentioned in class the fact that she makes it hard for us to earn decent grades and it's because she wants us to learn but the vast majority ended up scarred for life hating the subject and neither learning nor earning good grades. I was an exception because I basically busted my b** and it felt like a 3 class, not one. for the midterm and the final she prepares a slide with note lecture that she regurgitates and read in a lousy way without any practice or any chance to practice your mistakes and she calls it a review don't expect to get any sample exam or test. One of the worst classes I've had so far and I've had my shares of bad ones.

    May 2021

    To preface: Throughout this course, I was terrified I was going to get a D or worse. I somehow ended up getting an A-. This class WILL feel incredibly stressful while you're in it. Uribe's Macro isn't about economics, it's about math. It's a weird applied math class that requires you to memorize a bunch of models and manipulate them. It's hard to know where to even start when looking at Uribe's problem sets. This can be really disconcerting, especially coming out of principles where everything is more or less conceptual. You have to know strange derivative tricks, log tricks, and weird exponent tricks to solve Uribe's problem sets/exams. These weird math concepts make the class feel impossible. To do well in the class, you have to do a few things: 1) Approach it like a math class. 2) Don't focus on learning conceptual concepts. 3) Focus on the models. MEMORIZE all of the relevant equations associated with each model. 4) Do the problem sets and practice problems over and over again before exams. Overall, this class feels really impossible while you're taking it and can be really stressful/disheartening. I would recommend taking it with another professor. I did end up doing surprisingly well though, so don't be overly worried if you have to take Uribe. Just be prepared for it to mentally feel really weird/rough while you're taking it.

    May 2021

    The pacing of the class is quite slow, and he definitely isn’t the most engaging lecturer, but he’s easily one of the nicest professors at Columbia. He takes his time to ask for questions and patiently answers every one of them to make sure we understand it all. He’s also pretty great with emails, answering questions people have about the exams until the very last minute. The class isn’t too hard, and the exams take up most of the grade. The exams are basically completely based on lecture material, and remembering every detail is important. The issue with his tests is that although they’re not hard, they can be tricky if you’re not thorough/careful (he doesn’t really give too much partial credit). Being careless or forgetting a detail from class can easily cost you a letter grade since there are very few questions. And it appears that he does curve down if necessary.

    May 2021

    This class was extremely hard for me so take this review with a grain of salt: The class started off just fine (extremely similar to micro) but the material became a lot harder after the add/drop period. Vergote explained every concept in class in detailed but the homework was a lot harder than what's taught in class (imagine learning 5*6 = 30 in class but for homework they ask you to do calculus). It was impossible for me to finish the psets without going to the TA office hours. Midterm and final were similar to the practice exams but you still need to understand the concepts, because in my opinion they are harder than the psets. I didn't really understand what's going on, so my midterm and final score was around the class median/average. Vergote was, obviously, very knowledgeable, very kind and accommodating, and was generous enough to curve the median to a B+ which I appreciated. I just wish he taught an easier class lol. So I guess if you are interested in the topic and are willing to put in your effort, take this class and I wish you good luck!